Use which settings for TV or VCR audio?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by NeilO, Oct 6, 2002.

  1. NeilO

    NeilO Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2002
    Messages:
    3,087
    Likes Received:
    80
    I have a Pioneer VSX-D811S receiver. I just got it hooked up. For the DVD player, I'm just using the STANDARD setting which will recognize the DTS or Dolby Digital signal that is coming in. Now, I am wondering what setting might be the most pleasing for just regular TV audio coming in or audio coming from old prerecorded tapes.

    It seems that for tapes which are marked Dolby Surround, that I should use the Pro Logic II Movie setting.

    For a regular TV stereo signal, I could use the Direct setting which just sends everything to the front left and right. Or I could use Pro Logic (4.1) or Pro Logic II Movie (5.1) surround which may send some of the signal to the surround speakers.

    I am presuming that these type of options are on most receivers, so familiarity with the Pioneer might not be needed.

    Thanks,

    Neil
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 1999
    Messages:
    6,061
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    “Direct” settings are for two-channel music sources (FM radio, CD). For video, use the Dolby Pro-Logic setting (normal or II) that you think sounds the best. If there is surround-encoded material, it will be sent to the appropriate speakers. If the signal is mono, it will be sent to the center channel only.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. NeilO

    NeilO Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2002
    Messages:
    3,087
    Likes Received:
    80
    Thanks, that sounds reasonable.

    Neil
     
  4. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2001
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    0
    Now going beyond textbook, remember DPLII is designed to work on 2-chl stuff : VCR tapes, CDs, TV audio, and matrix it into surround sound, again up to your pleasure.
     

Share This Page