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Use Of RG6 To Connect Sub??

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Mike_Mc, Jul 29, 2004.

  1. Mike_Mc

    Mike_Mc Extra

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    I have 2 questions:

    1. I am thinking about using RG6 with screw on RCA plugs to connect my sub (with a run of 10-12 feet).

    2. Using the same type wiring to connect the HD tuner and DVD to the receiver (with runs of 3-5 feet).

    What do you think of this? Thanks for your help!
    Mike
     
  2. Jerry Klawiter

    Jerry Klawiter Screenwriter

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    It is 75 ohms and its fine to use
     
  3. Lee Distad

    Lee Distad Stunt Coordinator

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    Ditto what Jerry said. I use bulk RG-6 for all kinds of installations. The only downside is most RG-6 is fairly stiff and non-ductile, so tight bends and really short ( 1/2 meter, say) can be tricky.
     
  4. MingL

    MingL Stunt Coordinator

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    I use the same 75ohm cable to run anything that needs RCA plugs on either end.

    Basically, component, composite, sub, analog audio, digital coax are all using the same cable.

    BTW, I'm using a box of 200m Canare L-5CFB to wire everything up. Works beautifully.
     
  5. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Just don't get the copper over steel material and to improve flexibility, go for stranded instead of a single center conductor.
     
  6. Mike_Mc

    Mike_Mc Extra

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    Hey, guys, thank you! Getting fast help like this from Canada, Singapore and the Frigid North USA proves to me that we are all in this together!

    Mike[​IMG]
     
  7. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Do they make RG-6 like that? I thought that was a no-no for RF applications.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  8. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Sure do, like this one for example.
     
  9. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I've used it before for in-wall wiring. Works great when you have a long distance to cover. I'd use normal 75 Ohm RCA interconnects for the components though, but that's just me.
     
  10. Lee Distad

    Lee Distad Stunt Coordinator

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    That's VERY interesting Chu. You truly are a fountain of wisdom.
     
  11. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Nahhhhh, they're in all the catalogs is all.
     
  12. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Uhhhh.. I gotta disagree with part of this.

    Standard CATV coax with screw-on RCA jacks are fine for a subwoofer. (I am using one like this right now).

    But subwoofer frequencies are... the lowest-of-the-low. They are easy for nearly any coax to handle.

    HD video - about 100,000 times higher frequency. Issues start to arise as you get higher-and-higher in frequency.

    Think of a speed-bump in a road. No problem for a bicycle coasting at ... 0.5 mph. But hit the same bump at only 100 times faster (50 mph) - the results are very different.

    It's not just the coax, but the connectors as well.

    If you are going to make video cables - do it right. Go to Chris White's web: A really easy way to make your own AV cables. It shows you the basics of what to buy and some advice on where to buy the cable stock and connectors.

    You CAN get away without the special tools. Just practice the stripping on some spare RG6 coax until you get it right, and buy ... 2 extra RCA plugs and practice crimping with the less-expensive tools from Radio Shack before making your own video cables.

    I just looked up some prices, the 'good' HD rated coax runs about $1.80/ft (3 conductor) and the RCA plugs are about $3 each. (you will need 6 of them). So a 1 ft video cable will run you about $20 in parts.

    (You know what? I just bought 2 of the "F-to-RCA-Male" jacks at Radio Shack and they wanted $4.08 each!!! The crappy stuff is more expensive than the good Canare plugs!)

    Or, you can have a custom-cable site make you a cable for about $45 with the same stuff. Try www.bluejeanscables.com - the owner is a HTF member and he treats us well.
     

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