Use Gain on Sub or Receiver?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by sean strugnell, Jan 13, 2003.

  1. sean strugnell

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    I have read differing opinions on this on this and other forums. When calibrating, should you:

    (a) set your receiver to a positive gain number and then dial in the proper gain with your sub volume knob?

    (b) set your receiver to a negative gain number and then dial in the proper gain with your sub volume knob?

    (c) stop obsessing - it doesn't really matter.
     
  2. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Here's the theory derived from dealing with a Yamaha AVR and an SVS sub:

    Strive for a "golden mean," neither the Bass/LFE range adjustment on the AVR (remote) nor the sub amp control should end up near the lowest or the highest "dial" or range points.

    I call this a two-handed balance adjustment to finally get the settings that work for you:

    The AVR's SubOut jack will output say, 4 volts. Set the Bass/LFE output too low, you run the chance of the lower voltage not keeping the sub's Auto On feature active. Set the adjustment too high, you dont leave yourself any room to raise or lower the sub to your taste while sitting in the chair with the remote.

    Consider that once the sub control level is determined and set, we really dont want to have to constantly change it for programmatic listening.

    On the sub side, SVS for one says its amp will work well below the control's max setting, and suggests stating out at 2/3.

    So I now set the AVR about one-quarter up to -12dB (within Yamaha's -20 to 0dB range.) The sub control ends up slightly past the mid-point knob scale.

    After all this two-handed adjustment, you need to recalibrate sub output with the SPL meter and test disk tones, perhaps more than once during the process!
     
  3. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    Greg
    I did something similar to the way Bill calibrated his sub and the way I was always taught.

    I am using a Paradigm sub woofer with a Sony STRDA-777ES reciever. I simply placed the sub woofer volume at the half way point and then adjusted the LFE through the reciever. I ended up setting the sub woofer Db on my reciever to -5.5 Db at 75 decbals (+10 is max -20 is the minimum on my reciever). I think your goal should be to have your reciever and sub set as equal as possible.

    Hope this helps,

    Greg
     
  4. Marvin E

    Marvin E Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a Sherwood Newcastle R863 Receiver. I set the LFE trim settings as follows: 0 for Dolby Digital LFE (range is from -10 to 0) and the DTS LFE also to 0 (range is from -10 to +10). The Subwoofer trim is set at -7 (range is from -14 to +14) and I have my two Fosgate Audionics FA12.0 Subs set at -12 (range is from -30 to 0).I believe the theory is to let the sub amp do the work. If you set the receivers sub trim settings too high, you will get distortion. If I need to change the sub volume, I adjust the subwoofer trim, but I don't go beyond maybe a maximum of -4. I want the bass to blend with the movie and not tear down the house. A custom HT installer once told me that most peolpe have their subwoofers turned up too high trying to put bass where it shouldn't be.
     
  5. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    As a general rule (with electronics), it is always preferrable to avoid adjusting a pot to its minimum or its maximum. This can (not always) induce distortion into the signal. Some receivers are prone to adding some distortion to the LFE if they are adjusted too far from centre (0dB).

    That said, I would begin by setting the sub volume at the halfway point and using the receiver to start the adjustment. If however, (depending on the room and sub location of course) the receiver's LFE was ending up too high or too low on its scale/range of adjustment, I would compensate by adjusting the sub gain accordingly.

    Bottom line is I would not want either the sub gain or the receiver LFE level too far off centre.
     
  6. Marvin E

    Marvin E Stunt Coordinator

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