Use a Surge Suppressor on Your Sub Amp?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Kane, Jul 3, 2002.

  1. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    It seems logical to use a surge protector on a sub amp, like we do with the rest of the system's components. But I got to thinking about the potential downside of any "current limiting" since subs can be dynamically demanding at reference.

    I'm thinking about this since I'm using an APC 8/tel I originally got from Dell for my computer.

    I suppose it could compress bass somewhat, but who could tell? I use SVS 25-31PC w/ the 185W amp.

    (I know, I can answer my own question -- buy a Panamax MAX 5300 with high-current outlets!)
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    i just noticed that this was your 666th post...this sounds ominous Bill...truly. I recommend that you contact a Feng Shui specialist who will help you orient your system for maximum cosmic synergy which will allow you to tap the true potential of your sub without limit.
    You might also consider a replacement power cord. If you buy the power cord that can be seen at http://www.soundstage.com/ces98/repo..._scotthall.jpg then you'll be able to go to any men's room in the world and say with complete confidence...I've got a big one. In fact, having a cord like this will probably give you a lead role in "Boogie Nights 2" should it ever film. I imagine the cord will do a spectacular job of passing current, no? What price glory? If you have to ask you can't afford it.
    Happy 4th
     
  3. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    I am not sure who started this whole paranoia on current limiting in surge suppressors. Specially when dealing with transients, being that energy is already stored in the power supply capacitors of power amps. So rather than add to the never ending bickering as to whether they do or they don't, I will just articulate my own experience:

    I have a Sunfire Cinema Grand Signature rated at 800 watts a channel(4 ohm) X 5 driving all 4 ohm speakers (PSB's Stratus Gold i's and Carver surrounds) and a Carver A-760 rated at 600 a channel(4 ohm) X 2 driving twin SVS's 16-46 CS+'s (4 ohm).

    Everything is going through surge suppressors. I have
    A-B'ed the sound of this system with and without suppressors while playing VERY LOUD and found NO DIFFERENCE.

    When choosing a suppressor make sure that the watt or amperage rating exceeds that of the demands placed by the equipment. Watt rating of power amps is NOT what they output to speakers but what they take require form the AC outlet. (Look at sign next to fuse or AC power cord)

    Others might have had different experiences that might or might not be psychosomatic.
     
  4. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    This a good one. Traditional east-west judeo-christian synergist meets pragmatic rationalist. Yikes. 666! Good thing it’s Fourth of July so that loud explosions will scare Devils and Revelatory dark angels from my doorstep.

    Everything is back in alignment now. No Hubbel-plugged Power Cables to modify unwanted vibrations which need room to breath.

    Isn’t it true this hobby has many obsessive sideroads! Current limiting really isn’t one of mine. But it doesn’t hurt to ask if there’s anything to the phenomenon. Subtle, I would imagine. I'd like to know what kind of surge suppressor John is using, tho we strayed from the topic of surge units vs. protectors.

    Y’all have a safe and pleasant Fourth with family and friends…

    bill
     
  5. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    Hi, Bill.

    I have several surge suppressors, because of so much gear in two different locations.

    Mi audio rack has a Monster 5100 for everything except power amps(CD player, processor, cassette recorder, crossover, reel to reel recorder, noise reduction unit & turntable). The two power amps are fed of a Tripp IsoBar (Good surge supression, but probably less filtering than the Monster).

    The RP, VCR and DVD player (Location # 2) are on a Monster 2100 (I'm not positive about the model #)

    John
     
  6. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Good stuff, John
    I'm amazed and pleased for you, and thanks for your real-world report, that the TrippLite Isobar handles the Sunfire and Carver amps. I often recommend the Isobar6 DBS unit to folks starting out.
    Monster 5100 has two so-called "high current" plug outlets I see, and if I had one I personally wud use those for my power amp(s)[​IMG]
    I may be wrong, but I have the impression that most all surge suppressors have essentially the same level of AC line noise filters for RF/EMI rated ~50dB altho other spec paramenters differ.
    bill
     
  7. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    "I may be wrong, but I have the impression that most all surge suppressors have essentially the same level of AC line noise filters for RF/EMI rated ~50dB altho other spec paramenters differ."

    The Isobar units have 4 levels of suppression for 4 different pairs of outlets. Keep in mind too that a spec of "XX dB" suppression is not meaningful unless a specific band of frequencies is specified"

    Also noise suppression and surge suppression are two different things. Surge suppression prevents or alleviates damaging voltage spikes entering your equipment (and possibly damaging it) whereas noise suppression filters high frequencies that could possibly end up in the output of the device or interfere, in some way with its operation.
     

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