URGENT: Help figuring out Panasonic DVRs

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by KevinFord, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. KevinFord

    KevinFord Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,

    I have an URGENT Need for some help here.

    I'm trying to figure out one of the recorders from Panasonic to buy, and have very limited time to make a decision. I look at their website, comparing some of the models that are in my price range and I've come up with a few questions.

    Please refer to the link I've included below, which is a comparison of some panny recorder models.

    First, is the E80H REALLY the only one with the hard disk? Because they all seem to support Time Slip, I thought that meant they all have hard disks.

    Second, does anybody understand Panasonic's nomenclature for these models?
    DMR-E100HS, DMR-E80H, etc... What is the HS H, S, K?

    Thanks for the help.


    http://catalog2.panasonic.com/webapp...rs&items=65165|63096|63388|63384|
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  3. KevinFord

    KevinFord Stunt Coordinator

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    Michael,

    Thanks for the reply.

    I wasn't clear when I asked the question about the E80H being the only one with the hard disk. I was thinking that it's easy to think that the "80" in "DMR-E80H" is related to the size of the hard disk, as it has an 80GB hard disk. Given that, it APPEARS that the E60S would have a 60GB hard disk, but that isn't true. The nomenclature is a little misleading.
     
  4. Heath_E

    Heath_E Stunt Coordinator

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    To add to that.

    H = Includes hard disk
    S = Unit is siver
    K = Unit is black
    HS = hard disk/silver

    Of course, who knows why they left the "S" off of the E80H since it is obviously silver.
     
  5. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  6. Phil Tomaskovic

    Phil Tomaskovic Supporting Actor

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    You can do time slip while recording to a dvd-ram. Note depending on recording quality, you can get 1, 2, or 4 hrs on it. The HS2 is an old model, I wouldn't get it. I have the 80, very good. The 100 has a bigger drive, has firewire inputs and pc slot for memory cards for jpgs and some new editing features (eg, menu page can be created with index pictures.

    The letter suffix on the model number is inconsistent. Heath's answer is good. Although the 80H is silver and they don't bother with the S.

    Dvd-ram is neat in that it lets you read and record at the same time. But ram discs aren't cheap and if you want to do time shifting, the hard drive is better, plus you can archive and then burn to dvd-r. For example, I recorded Monk on USA and when I got 3 weeks saved, I burned them on 1 dvd-r. If you had ram, you'd have to keep switching disc when you wanted to record that show.

    Email me if you have more ?'s
     
  7. KevinFord

    KevinFord Stunt Coordinator

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    Phil,

    I spoke to Panasonic when I was choosing this model (which still hasn't been ordered yet, but will most likely be ordered today).

    They told me they recommend discs made by Panasonic, Pioneer, or BASF (Or did they say TDK)? Anyway, they said to stay away from the huge-spindles-for-a-few-bucks types of DVDs.

    Have you used the cheaper DVDs and can you report on their performance.

    I've copied this to your email as you requested in the above post.

    Thanks, Kevin
     
  8. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    There are numerous reports on people's experience with different brands of discs. A few threads:

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=108419
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=140401
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=157777
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=145149

    My own experience with bulk discs has been fine, but that's because I always do my primary recording to a hard drive and then dub to DVD-R. When I get a bad blank DVD-R, all I lose is the time needed to set up a new dub. Given the price advantage of buying in bulk, I think it's well worth it.

    M.
     

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