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UPS w/ AVR plugged inline with Monster HTS power conditioner?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by TonyTone, Oct 22, 2002.

  1. TonyTone

    TonyTone Supporting Actor

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    Is it feasible to plug a UPS w/ AVR (like the ones offered for PC equipment--650 VA and up) into a wall outlet, then connecting a Monster HTS3600 or HTS5100 power conditioner to the UPS? Mind you, I have no delusions about actually using the UPS as a backup power supply--I'm using it mostly, if not entirely, for the AVR feature; and a 650 VA unit can be had for under $100. I don't know if 650 VA is sufficient for HT needs, but the fact that you can get a unit that has AVR at around the $100 price point (1000 VA units can be had for under $200) is enticing, especially since the Monster HTS series don't have AVR.
     
  2. Luis C

    Luis C Stunt Coordinator

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    Tony,
    You can get better results if you just get the Monster AVS2000...
     
  3. TonyTone

    TonyTone Supporting Actor

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    Luis--yes, a very nice piece of equipment...but for people like myself who don't have a boatload of money to spend--is it worth the roughly $1250 street price? Granted the AVS2000 has a lot of neat--if not worthwhile--features that a $100 UPS/AVR unit doesn't have, but I reckon more than a few people probably wouldn't miss them if they weren't even offered--otherwise, we'd all be harping on how foolish we'd be if we don't absolutely buy one. At $1250, the AVS2000 clearly isn't a must-buy, must-want, or can-buy, whereas a cheap but effective $100-or-so AVR is clearly in the can-buy category.
    In any case, I'm still waiting for an answer to my original query...[​IMG]
     
  4. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    tony,

    Yes, it is feasible to plug a surge protector/power center into a UPS unit PROVIDED the UPS is big enough to handle the load downstream.

    Nearly all surge protector/power centers are rated at 15A and 1800 watts. A small 700VA UPS actually handles something like 500-600 watts. Here, an APC Smart-UPS 700 costs about $200+ and does have AVR. By comparison, a Tripp-Lite LC1800 (watt) AVR "line conditioner" goes for $240, but isnt UPS.

    So one wud have to carefully match load factors. You can see if you do this, you're getting closer to $500-$700 for a "smart" 1000VA to 2200VA UPS, which begins to defeat your purpose. You can be sure that someone has tried versions of this: looking to the computer/office supply side for cheaper gear for HT use. But I wouldn't throw a $100 UPS into the system AVR or not. It's just going to be too small.

    The real question is why one needs a voltage regulator in the HT environment. VRs are useful when:
    * Frequent brownouts from the electric utility company that drop voltages to 80-87 volts.
    * Occasional power spikes to 140V and above when electrical system lines are damaged and the utility must switch around, going from 0 volts to WHATEVER before stabilizing.

    A UPS in HT is useful when:
    * Facing the threat of weather/accident induced temporary loss of house power, the need to protect sensitive projector motors/fans and certain electronics from destructive powerdown-powerup glitches.

    Most HT gear with internal power supplies are built quite robustly to accommodate +/- 5 percent or higher voltage fluctuations everyday. This is normal.

    bill
     
  5. TonyTone

    TonyTone Supporting Actor

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    Bill--thanks for the thorough reply! FWIW--I wasn't fooling myself into thinking that a $100 UPS w/AVR would be sufficient for HT; in all honesty I had forgotten to reference the power ratings for a $100 UPS, and you're right--600-700 watts won't cut it for HT.

    I was just wondering about the feasibility since PC-oriented AVR units seem to be the rage these days; a few years ago, one could find AVR (let alone having even heard anything about it) only on high-priced ($1000 or more) UPS units...now, one can find it even in $70 UPS boxes.
     
  6. Thomas J. Coyle III

    Thomas J. Coyle III Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi all:
    I believe that UPSs for computers use a stepped sine wave that works okay for PCs with switching power supplies. AV equipment, until recently, use either laminated or toroidal transformers that really do not like stepped sine waves. I believe that they may work on a UPS, but their performance may suffer. The Tripp-Lite line voltage stabilizers use a ferro-resonate transformer to prevent brown outs down to around 90vac. If you use one, make sure that it has sufficient power capacity. I have an 800 watt Tripp-Lite, since discontinued, that I used with my computer equipment until UPSs became popular and reasonable in price.
    Regards,
    TCIII
     

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