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Unplanned Obsolescence (1 Viewer)

Deekay

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The heart of my 9 year-old HT -- Sony KDL 46EX700 LCD TV and Panasonic DMP-BD65 Blu-Ray Player -- continue to perform flawlessly. I feel no need, and am in no rush to replace them now (though at some future point plan to make the jump to OLED).

But a "gotcha" has thrust me into doing something now. First, a couple of years ago, I lost YouTube as Google no longer supported either device. No problem living without that, as my desktop computer serves well for what is only occasional use.

Then yesterday I got the dreaded email from Amazon stating they will cease to support both devices in September, and I would therefore lose Prime Video. Unlike YouTube, that is a "must have".

It is quite frustrating to have to replace components that are still perfect in every other way, but I guess that is the nature of tech today.

First thought was to get a new TV. But OLED remains very expensive.

Second thought was the much less expensive option of a new Blu-Ray player. Presumably it would be 4K, as there aren't many "2K" players out there anymore. (In addition, as 2K players gradually become extinct, I suspect I'd be risking Amazon, Google, and NETFLIX relatively quickly no longer supporting even a new 2K player, despite it being many years "younger" than my current one.)

But this option may be problematic, my internet pick-and-shovel work seems to indicate that 4K players paired with non-4K TVs present lots of problems. The truth and/or degree of that is beyond my expertise.

Bottomline: I'm quite happy with what I have, but sadly, need to replace one or both in order to have Amazon, NETFLIX, and YouTube functions. (A "nice to have" would adding net browsing capability as well.)

Would be grateful for advice and recommendations that would deliver the best capability at the best cost.

Replace both components, or replace one?
If one, which one?
Brands, models?
Any accessories required -- e.g., upgraded HDMI cables?

Thanks in advance for your expertise and thoughts.
 

Deekay

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Dee Kos
The heart of my 9 year-old HT -- Sony KDL 46EX700 LCD TV and Panasonic DMP-BD65 Blu-Ray Player -- continue to perform flawlessly. I feel no need, and am in no rush to replace them now (though at some future point plan to make the jump to OLED).

But a "gotcha" has thrust me into doing something now. First, a couple of years ago, I lost YouTube as Google no longer supported either device. No problem living without that, as my desktop computer serves well for what is only occasional use.

Then yesterday I got the dreaded email from Amazon stating they will cease to support both devices in September, and I would therefore lose Prime Video. Unlike YouTube, that is a "must have".

It is quite frustrating to have to replace components that are still perfect in every other way, but I guess that is the nature of tech today.

First thought was to get a new TV. But OLED remains very expensive.

Second thought was the much less expensive option of a new Blu-Ray player. Presumably it would be 4K, as there aren't many "2K" players out there anymore. (In addition, as 2K players gradually become extinct, I suspect I'd be risking Amazon, Google, and NETFLIX relatively quickly no longer supporting even a new 2K player, despite it being many years "younger" than my current one.)

But this option may be problematic, my internet pick-and-shovel work seems to indicate that 4K players paired with non-4K TVs present lots of problems. The truth and/or degree of that is beyond my expertise.

Bottomline: I'm quite happy with what I have, but sadly, need to replace one or both in order to have Amazon, NETFLIX, and YouTube functions. (A "nice to have" would adding net browsing capability as well.)

Would be grateful for advice and recommendations that would deliver the best capability at the best cost.

Replace both components, or replace one?
If one, which one?
Brands, models?
Any accessories required -- e.g., upgraded HDMI cables?

Thanks in advance for your expertise and thoughts.
Apologies, this is a "PS" from me, the OP.

Another thought, would something like Roku be a solution to this situation?

I know nothing about "streaming devices" like this -- please advise!
 

Peter Apruzzese

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If you want a streaming device, I'd recommend either an Apple TV 4K or the Roku Ultra 4K. You don't need to worry about them being "4K" devices with your 1080 gear, you can configure the output to match what you have.
 

JohnRice

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I absolutely second that advice. Do NOT buy a TV or disc player for streaming. Get a dedicated streaming device. If you want to stay more budget conscious, go with Roku. If you want premium, go with the AppleTV 4K, especially if you have other Apple/iOS devices and want to integrate them. How do they work? Just like your current streaming TV/player, except a LOT smoother, faster and more reliable.
 

jcroy

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(On a more general rant).

Ever since the dawn of digital tv circa late-1990s, I always suspected hardware obsolesence would become the norm, whether planned or unplanned. Back in the day, this was already the case for computers. It was a matter of time that it would be the norm for stuff like tvs, cable boxes, vcr/dvr, etc ...

When my parents wanted to get better cable service in the early-2000s, I told them it was a waste of money to buy the actual hardware outright. They would be the proud owners of a piece of "brick" junk eventually. Unfortunately they didn't heed my word and just purchased the box outright, where it became a useless "brick" about 5-6 years later.

The previous box my parents purchased for the analog tv cable service over the 80s and 90s, lasted amost 20 years until it finally died. They were under the mistaken impression that a digital box would also last 20 years. (In principle the digital box could have lasted 20 years, if the cable company didn't abruptly change the serivce and made the box useless).
 

Deekay

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Many thanks to all three responders -- great advice, great perspective. With John's comment in mind, as an Apple guy, I plan to go with the AppleTV 4K.

Now a follow-up question:

My DSL modem (and iMac desktop) and my TV are at opposite ends of my house. As my wifi doesn't reach the TV, I stream via a wired Cisco Linksys "powerline adapter". It works beautifully.

So as I've done with the TV itself and the Blu-Ray player, I will wire the AppleTV 4K into the powerline adapter, and to the TV via HDMI.

My research has indicated that the AppleTV 4K does not in itself extend wifi. My question is, will the "screen mirror" and "iPad as remote control" capabilities work with AppleTV 4K set up in a wired vs. wireless configuration?

Again, thanks in advance for responses.
 

JohnRice

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My research has indicated that the AppleTV 4K does not in itself extend wifi. My question is, will the "screen mirror" and "iPad as remote control" capabilities work with AppleTV 4K set up in a wired vs. wireless configuration?
The ATV is not a hot spot. It communicates with your router, but doesn't directly communicate with anything else and it does not extend the signal. Keep in mind that while your A/C extender might work fine for your current uses, high bandwidth demands might exceed it's abilities. You might look into a wired WiFi extender or a grid network setup. As far as iOS remote control or screen sharing, that is sent through WiFi and then to your device(s) from the router.
 

JohnRice

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Incidentally, I have my office at one end of the house and the internet comes in the opposite end of the house. My modem is in a storage room at the end of the house where the internet comes in, and then I run ethernet from it to the router, which is at the center of the house. I then have ethernet going to my office, and the HT, so I have solid, fast connections at those places. All of that is in the basement and I run the ethernet along the gas line pipe, which conveniently runs the length of the house. I have the router on a high shelf, so it's immediately below the ground level floor. It all works very well, with one router. If there was a second floor to the house, it probably wouldn't work and I'd at least need to get the router on the ground floor.
 

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