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Ultra HD Now 4K’s Official CE Industry Name. Are you going to buy one? (1 Viewer)

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Kevin Collins

After some debate in the working group stages, the Consumer Electronics Association’s Board of Industry Leaders unanimously selected “Ultra High-Definition or Ultra HD” as the official name going forward for all next-generation video displays with so-called “4K” resolution capability. The Working Group, now known as the CEA Ultra HD Working Group, had to come to a quick conclusion because manufacturers were read to ship units. There was some gnashing of teeth around the name as "Ultra HD" has been loosely used before as "next generation HD" which encompassed both 4K and 8K. Supposedly the CEA did intensive consumer research and "Ultra HD" had the highest ratings.




Joe Kane calls the format 1260P based on the minimum performance attributes for resolution including at least eight million active pixels – at least 3,840 horizontally and 2,160 vertically. For those that will be at the HTF Meet, Joe will be speaking on Thursday evening and this is one of the topics he plans on covering. I'm curious to what his take will be on "Ultra HD".

I'm still not buying into this format for the reason listed in previous posts. There isn't going to be a new optical disc format, ATSC isn't going to change to support it and it is unlikely the bandwidth is there to transmit it, people are moving more towards convenience in streaming and studios aren't going to rescan catalog content just for a higher resolution format.

There are more movies shot for 3D than there are in 4K format and we are all buried with the amount of natively shot 3D movies out there.

The question comes down to are you going to buy a "Ultra HD" display? Bring on the debate! I'm going to wait this one out. Maybe we need to go to CES to see all the offerings that will be in full force? I can't go this year, I will be on vacation during CES.
 

Michael TLV

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Greetings
CES should be your vacation destination. ;)
I want to know if the uhd format has adopted the DCI color space ? That is the big difference here, not the resolution. I'm 12 back from my 102" projection screen now. I won't be moving the seat forward to 3 feet just so I can see the added detail. Give us more colors please. We can see that from anywhere in the room.
Regards
[email protected] Laser Video Experience
Sent from my Transformer Prime TF201 using Tapatalk 2
 

Steve Tannehill

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Already a healthy discussion on this topic here:
http://www.hometheaterforum.com/t/324563/are-there-going-to-be-ulta-hd-blu-rays-for-ultra-hd-tv
 

KevinFC

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Here you go sonys new flagship....
http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&identifier=S_4KTV&XID=O:sony%204k:dg_tv_msnsrch:e&qs=sony%204k%20&k_id=52bda02b-fd9b-ea08-da50-00000838692d
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Count me out. As I noted here, we currently aren’t getting the full potential of even 720p for most TV programming, and I expect most blu-rays as well. Anyone here watch NCIS? That show barely qualifies for SD, much less HD. If content providers won’t even give us the full potential of our current hi-def standard, what’s the point of Ultra HD?
I expect 4K will get a nitch following at best and ultimately fail. We’ve already seen this rodeo with the high-resolution audio discs from ten years ago: Not enough people felt the improvement was significant enough to justify the trouble or expense.
Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

Craig W

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All 4K or ultraHD or whatever they are calling it is just another attempt by CE makers to make the 'next' thing to make you feel that you 'need' to have it. 1080p is more than adequate even on screens in the 100" to 130" range at normal distances. The problem with the screendoor effect has more to do with the size of the inter-pixel spacing. I use a SXRD projector which has a much smaller visible grid. Even with my LCD unit prior I could not see a screendoor effect.
Large 1080p LCD flat panels have the same issue the grid is just visible from close distances.
 

Craig W

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The fact is DVD was never meant to be shown on large home projection setups. BD is more than capable of being a source device on a projector setup. Even with 100" screens at normal distances 10-12ft you are barely on the edge of slightly noticing an improvement in detail with UHD/4K. The fact is that setups at size or larger is still a minuscule segment of the market. Consumers are going to be beat over the head with this 'needed' upgrade to only find out they can't see a difference at normal distances. And the saddest reality in the whole situation is that all consumers are going to have access to in the next few years is 1080p upscaled to UHD. This is out of the same CE play book that was used when we transitioned from SD to HD. All we are going to hear about over the next few years is the great up scaling algorithms. Sorry but I am not interested in up scaling BD or any 1080 content for that matter. We saw it took 5-6 years for BD to firmly establish itself in the market and that was after it debuted not counting the years it was in the lab, forming partnerships, ect. Those of you expecting a 4K format to be viable in the market in the next 24-36months are truly being delusional. At best I say it's five years before we even have a viable product being readied for mass market release. I hate to say it but the market for this product considering the large display systems needed to truly appreciate has LaserDisc written all over it.
 

Flatnate

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Hey pretty new to the forum so go easy on me. I had to chime in as I really geek out on this stuff.
Long story short is the verdict is still out for me. I think it really depends on whether manufacturers adopt a wider color gamut, and more so if any source content will be available that utilizes that capability. The ITU-R came up with the UHDTV specs a few months ago and they settled on Rec. 2020 rather than the current HDTV Rec 709 color space for it.
Now if any new 4K Blu-Ray content comes along that utilizes the wider Rec 2020 color spec then I'm totally in. If its a regular 8 bit color spec using Rec 709, and the only benefit is increased pixel density than I guess I don't care all that much. So wait and see for me.
 

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