Ultimate resolution?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Andy_Munich, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Andy_Munich

    Andy_Munich Stunt Coordinator

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    A question for you imaging science buffs out there: what might the ultimate resolution be? Is there a level at which the typical human eye would not be able to tell the difference between a projected image and the view through a window (barring the obvious issue of spacial dimensions)?

    Just curious guys.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    If I read this correctly, it's about 0.3 arc-minutes. The last paragraph describes a piece of paper that is about 1.5:1 aspect ratio, and it would require 10600x7000 pixels at 20 inches. So clearly we've got a ways to go.
     
  3. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    On the other hand, there will always be a visible difference between a window, in the given example, and a projected image.

    Another query is, at what temporal resolution does the image become indistinguishable from 'reality'? I know there are people who say somewhere in the 60-72Hz. I don't know that I really buy that...

    then, of course, there are the people that you'll never be able to fool... tetrachrome people, and other oddities of nature that don't fit into the standard population..

    Leo Kerr
    [email protected]
     
  4. Mike Williams

    Mike Williams Screenwriter

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    There was an asian company that made a 10 minute movie in what they called "extreme resolution" or perhaps it was "ultimate resolution." They strapped a camera to a car and drove around L. A. (I think it was) and then showed it to an audience on a 15 foot screen.

    Many of the audience members vomited because the resolution was so clear, they couldn't distinguish it from real life and they got sick from "seeing" the effects of fast motion, but their bodies not actually feeling the motion.
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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  6. Richard Paul

    Richard Paul Stunt Coordinator

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    The Japanese have experimented and tested UHDV (Ultra High Definition Video), which has a resolution of 4320 by 7680 pixels at 60 fps (frames per second). From the sounds of it the image was so clear that the people who saw the demonstration of it said it was far more real than even film. That probably is true for 35mm film and it would be at least equal to 70mm without the film grain. The researchers who made UHDV said it was as real as a 2-D image would be ever be needed. Personally I see no reason to doubt that it is as high a resolution as could ever be needed for the human eye.

    Also to do 3-D all you really need is two cameras lenses set to the left and right of each other. The methods to show 3-D are terrible at the moment, but the methods to record it are very simple. Though recording with 3-D does double the data rate that simply means it goes from 48 Gbps(Gigabits per second) to 96 Gbps. 1080p(or 1080i) at 30 fps has a data rate of 1.5 Gbps. Recording at 96 Gbps, 4320p at 60fps in 3D, will be possible within 15 to 25 years.
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I don't think it is the resolution that makes people nauseous but rather the frame rate and the kind and amount of motion and the field of vision occupied by the picture.

    I get sick playing most 480i video games and at some ordinary movie theater showings (the normal 24 fps with each frame flashed on the screen twice) and when watching typical home videos with all the jerkiness from a hand held camcorder.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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