U.K. DVD format

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon-K-Wilson, Dec 13, 2001.

  1. Jon-K-Wilson

    Jon-K-Wilson Auditioning

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    Is the U.K. version the same for the U.S.A?

    My friend ordered "Angel" from the U.K. and was hoping it would work in her player?

    Thanks

    Jon
     
  2. Mark_Wilson

    Mark_Wilson Screenwriter

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    No, for two reasons. Even if Region codes didn't exist, the video format isn't the same. Her TV wouldn't be able to display a UK dvd or video tape.
     
  3. andrew markworthy

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    Jon, this area is a minefield of complications, but in essence you need to know that the UK uses the PAL system and the USA uses NTSC. The UK is lucky in that most new videos and TVs bought here will play both PAL and NTSC. Thus, we Brits can order stuff from the USA with impunity. However, I *think* that in the USA, it's pretty much NTSC only. However, it's possible I'm wrong on this and that your systems will accept PAL. Can any American members advise on this?
     
  4. Didier

    Didier Agent

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    U-K DVDs, like other Western Europe DVDs (France, Germany, etc...) are region 2 PAL (625 lines, 25fps), while US DVDs are region 1 NTSC (525 lines, 30 fps).

    Most DVD players sold in Western Europe can play both PAL and NTSC, while most of those sold in North America are NTSC only.

    Of course there is also the region problem which can be solved. I have a "Raite" 715S player (sold here in France under the "Tokaï" trade mark) which can play both PAL and NTSC with any region code...

    Didier.
     
  5. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    There are no dual-standard consumer TV sets for sale in the United States to my knowlege. Some high-end projectors do both, but I haven't seen a TV yet that does.

    Mostly this is due to the fact that very few people in the US know or care about what's available outside of it. They don't even know that their players are region locked.

    If you can't return that Angel set, I'll buy it off of her for the Australian set price (about $75) if you can't get rid of it any other way. Private message me if need be.
     
  6. dcaconnolly

    dcaconnolly Extra

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    I agree with Jeff's point that most people don't know or care about PAL capability in the US - the same is true for NTSC capability in the UK. But that doesn't necessarily mean that PAL doesn't exist in any US TV sets.

    I bought a Sony Wega in the UK last year, from a Sony shop. I asked for NTSC capability, but neither the sales leaflet nor the Sony technical help people could give any information. In the end we put an NTSC tape in a VCR, plugged in into the Wega, and it worked!

    Here in HK everything is multi-standard because we have both PAL and NTSC broadcasts. I haven't noticed any significant TV price penalty for this. Andrew says that the UK is now pretty much the same, even without NTSC broadcasts. And I doubt if US sets with the same chips would have the PAL feature deliberately disabled. So it wouldn't surprise me if some US TVs will handle PAL, even though it isn't advertised. And if that's the case, surely HTF is the place to identify those sets, so that Americans can also enjoy our simple life without having to get a DVD player with PAL-NTSC conversion built in?
     
  7. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    Due to extreme paranoia about pirating and movie rights most US companies do go out of their way to limit multisystem availability in the USA. For Sony at least the only officially available "export models" are at Port-of-Entry shops and military PX. The Grey Market does exist but depends on local sources.

    Our choice for region 2 movies was a hardware decoder card for the PC. This can do all the necessary conversions and modifications but requires a level of computer knowledge that not everyone has.With the right tweaks we could get progressive scan component output from the card if we needed it.

    The USA is also a discount market and our products are often stripped down versions. Since we don't want to pay full price we don't usually get full value. It has been said that the engineers design the set and then they take out everything they can and still have it work.

    Right now I'm trying to find out if any other country has an extended version of the Dune 2000 miniseries. I heard there were deleted and extended scenes available but not for the US release.
     
  8. Hendrik

    Hendrik Supporting Actor

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  9. Ted Todorov

    Ted Todorov Cinematographer

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  10. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    I forgot about that Sampo set
    In any case, if you asked your average American what PAL was, they would have no clue. It's not a feature people care about here unfortunately. They're satisfied being sheep. Believe you me when I say there are 50x more UK people interested in importing NTSC material than there are Americans interesting in importing PAL.
    [​IMG]
     

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