Types of HD

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by RonGecan, Sep 11, 2002.

  1. RonGecan

    RonGecan Agent

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    Hello Everyone,

    Sorry if this has been covered extensively, but I was wondering about the merrits of different HD monintor types. It seems that the most widely available units are rear projection. I've seen some crt screens, and then there are the pricey LCD and Plasma models.

    Two questions:

    1) Why so many rear projections? Cheap to build?

    2) Any obvious difference in the picture qualities between the three? I have heard rear projection to be the lowest quality, but truthfully I've never been impressed with any of the HD types each time I've been at, say, Best Buy. I once saw a fabulous display at Myer Emco when they routed a true HD signal through. Does Best Buy use some low grade signal when showing off their monitors?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    * Do not judge a disply by how it is "set up" in a Best Buy showroom. Tweak the sets yourself.

    * There are lots of picture-quality differences among the three technologies, most of them doing with light output and black levels (and black-level depth is where CRT-based designs still lead the way).

    * Though plasma technology is improving considerably (at least on screen sizes of 50 inches or less), LCD still seems to be lagging in many areas (though there are certain models which are exceptions to the rule).

    * All monitor/TV/display queries go into this section!
     
  3. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Just to expand a little on Jack’s comments, the ‘Best Buys’ of the world are generally not set up to properly display a picture. Most will not even have HD signals available for demonstration. Further, the display sets are almost invariably set up with the very highest picture settings, ones that most viewers would not use at home.

    Displays can be divided into two main groups: projection and direct view. Each of these groups can be further subdivided into two main types: projection into ‘front projection’ and ‘rear projection’ and direct view into plasma and CRT.

    In general projection displays are chosen when the objective is a large picture. Front projection provides the largest image, and many models are flexible in switching from 16:9 to 4:3 displays. They do not perform well is rooms with ambient light. These characteristics mean that they are well suited to dedicated home theatre environments, such as a special, purpose-built room.

    Rear projection (RPTV) displays are very popular because they offer large pictures at a reasonable price. Many (and I am one) feel that their picture quality is not up to CRT standards. However some newer models, especially Pioneer and Mitsubishi have models with very fine pictures. RPTVs are big and bulky, meaning that they are not easy to move or decorate around (a factor with my wife). They also usually require realignment after they have been moved. Finally RPTVs have a narrow viewing angle—this is just fine so long as you and yours sit within the viewing angle. While this might seem negative, a good many (perhaps even most) members of this forum have RPTV as their main display. There is no question if you are interested in a big picture for a reasonable price that you should consider RPTV.

    In contrast to projection (and especially rear projection), direct view sets have a wide viewing angle. This is especially true of plasma displays. Plasma displays always appear very attractive at first glance and many fall in love with them immediately. Plasma displays can be fairly large (up to around 50”), though not so large are projection displays. The main problems with plasma are cost and the rendition of black. And what is worse, those sets that render black reasonably well (Pioneer Elite, among others) cost a very great deal indeed. Plasma displays that are even close to my budget do not have a picture acceptable to me. You might feel differently. For sure you can put these screens almost anywhere, including hanging them on a wall. I admit that I lust in my heart for one, but don’t think that they will hit my budget anytime soon.

    CRTs have (for me) the best picture. However, the size of CRT displays is the smallest of any of the above. While the cost less than plasmas, they are more expensive than projection technology. CRTs also have a reasonably wide viewing angle. Many on this forum feel that they do not provide a picture of sufficient size. You should expect much less maintenance on a CRT set than RPTV.

    Hope this helps.

    Do your own evaluation. If possible go to a dealer with some high end equipment and see HD in good conditions. Even at a “Best Buy” you may be able to compare sets by bringing along your own DVDs. Don’t forget to put the displays in a “normal” picture setting.

    Good luck. Trust your own judgment. Don’t hesitate to return a set that does not perform to your expectations.

    Most importantly, have fun.
     
  4. RonGecan

    RonGecan Agent

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    Thanks Lew. That is extremely helpful and covers pretty much what I was interested in learning. I've been pondering the home theater setup for a while -- basic speaker requirements leads to more expensive speakers wants, which then naturally requires a top flight reciever, but how could I have all that and watch movies on a small tv, but if new tv then why waste the dinero and not get digital, etc, etc. So, it suddenly looks like a lot of $s. Anyhow, I've done a bit of reading on speakers, and audio, much less on video. So, thanks for the info. [​IMG]
    Ron
     

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