tweeter imagers - are they for real?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by gomez_a, Feb 21, 2002.

  1. gomez_a

    gomez_a Stunt Coordinator

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    - just came across this and was wondering if anyone's had any experience w/these tweeter imagers . . . . is one supposed to apply these to the tweeters of the surround, center, and front mains? As inexpensive as they are, it looks like they may be worth a try?
    - http://www.audio-ideas.com/tweaks.html
    wpuld love to hear what folks think about these
     
  2. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    Just from a theoretical standpoint, my guess is that they focus more of the tweeter's energy to the listening position (if this is how you have them pointed). The net result of this will be increased efficiency for the tweeter only. IMO this would throw the balance out. Speakers are calibrated as they are, not with extra stuff like that on the front.

    I'm guessing that at first a user would hear more "detail" with a dB or 2 more treble, but this would soon become fatiguing. Just my guess.... You're right though, they're cheap and would be interesting to find out.
     
  3. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Baffle shape is important when designing speakers. To take this concept to an extreme, consider horn-loaded speakers (like Klipsch). At any rate, I wouldn't want to 2nd guess a manufacturer and start slapping these on my speakers (unless they were crappy to begin with).
     
  4. gomez_a

    gomez_a Stunt Coordinator

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    good points RIchard, Greg, - there an interesting "curiosity" to play/tweak your system with[​IMG]
     
  5. Roy Wallace

    Roy Wallace Stunt Coordinator

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    Those are interesting items.

    My old JBL Decade 26's have a 2 inch diameter 1/4 inch thick foam ring around the tweeters.

    I wonder if focusing the sound into the field was their intention when they were new...

    I like the way manufacturers develop new spins on old ideas.

    RW
     
  6. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    AR has used foam around Mids and Highs for decades...

    Just about every speaker AR has ever made used some sort

    of open celled foam either around the tweeter or around

    the whole baffle. The Current Hi-Res Line uses a foam

    baffle which surrounds the tweeters and mids along the

    whole baffle area. The idea is sound (pardon the pun) to

    eliminate radiance off of the baffle and to focus the sound

    towards the listener. There are more ways to do this but

    foam works and is inexpensive.

    Can't hurt to try them, they would be reversible if they

    did not give you the sound you wanted.
     
  7. Marc H

    Marc H Second Unit

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    They definitely work. They focus the soundstage effectively by narrowing the dispersion of the high frequencies in a big way.

    The benefit is only to the sweet spot listener and off axis listening can get grainy and harsh.

    In a way they seem to be a bit of a shame though; they are pictured on a pair of Energy C2. The designer of the C2 went to great efforts to get as wide dispersion and a smooth off axis response as possible out of that tweeter only to be squashed (squished?) by the foam ring.

    It's pretty easy to construct a pair to try though. Just need some foam, scissors and a steady hand. I did that about 25 years ago with an old pair of Dynaco A25.

    You can get a similar effect if you sit down in the stereo sweet spot and cup your hands around your ears but open towards the speakers. You should notice the soundstage become more sharply defined by eliminating the side reflections.
     

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