TV to A/V connection question??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark__T, Aug 10, 2002.

  1. Mark__T

    Mark__T Agent

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    Let me see if I have this right-All I need is to connect the "RF cable" and "monitor in" to the television. I have a Pioneer VSX-D711 A/V Multi-Channel Receiver and Panasonic PT-40LC12. So even though this $3000 TV has all type of inputs and outputs in back and in the front is this true that everything should be connected through the A/V receiver except the "RF cable and "monitor in"???


    Thanks
    Mark
     
  2. Selden Ball

    Selden Ball Second Unit

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    Mark,

    Many people claim that in order to have the best video image you should connect your players directly to the TV. This avoids whatever noise or loss in resolution might be caused by the connectors and electronics in the receiver.

    Many others find that the simplification of switching everything through the receiver far outweighs whatever problems the receiver might introduce. On most systems, the tiny amount of distortion that the receiver might be introducing is quite invisible.

    You should try it both ways to see which works best for you.
     
  3. Mark__T

    Mark__T Agent

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    Selden

    If I were to hook all the components directly to the TV, what is the best connection method so that I could still have sound come through the receiver and get all the home theater advantages?
     
  4. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

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    >> If I were to hook all the components directly to the TV, what is the best connection method so that I could still have sound come through the receiver and get all the home theater advantages?
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    What confuses some people is that, when you want to use your stereo system for the TV audio, all the audio connections including the TV's audio out should come to your A/V receiver while all the video signals are headed for the TV. In this case all of the TV left and right audio jacks in back will be left empty.
    If you connect video through the receiver as well, and if you have some composite sources, some S-video sources, and some component video sources, you almost always need one each of composite, S-video, and component video cables sets all going from receiver to TV. Practically no receiver cross feeds the composite inputs to the S-video monitor output, etc. You will still have to pick up the TV remote to choose Video 1 for a composite source, Video 2 for an S-video source, and Video 3 for a component video source which eliminates the advantage of using just the receiver remote to change both picture and sound.
    For laserdisk players, digital cable and satellite cable try both composite and S-video cables. For HDTV boxes that also receive regular channels, try both composite and component cables. If any channels look better via composite video, keep both kinds of cables connected. But only connect one kind of video to each jack cluster behind the TV. WHen you have to run both composite and componetn, etc. you use up inputs behind the TV very fast while with your receiver you can run composite, S-video and audio (or composite, component and audio, or all four) from one video source all to one receiver input.
    The remaining advantage of putting video through the receiver is for those folks who don't have enough jacks behind the TV. With the more upscale TV models, the component video connections are more likely to be exhausted first. Some folks run the component video sources directly to the TV since these signals are more sensitive to degradation from less than perfect cables and switching along the way. The rest of the TV inputs have to be shared by everything else which may require that other signals go through the receiver.
    Even for composite video you need video grade cables. Those packaged singly, not explicitly for component video, look like audio cables but have yellow colored ends. Sometimes an audio cable will carry video OK but it is almost impossible to tell before you buy and try it for freedom from blurring or ghosting.
    Another idiosyncrasy: If one component input of the TV "plays all speeds" (accepts all scan rates) you can connect regular component video, progressive scan component video, and HDTV all through your receiver which is connected to your TV. But if a second set of component jacks is used for HDTV or if HDTV is degraded going through your receiver, you will have to connect the HDTV box video directly to the TV.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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