TV recommendations needed

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bob Chicago, Sep 24, 2002.

  1. Bob Chicago

    Bob Chicago Auditioning

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    My wife gave the green light to take advantage of Best Buy's no interest for 24 months sale and get a new TV. I'm trying to make the most educated decision in a short time so I figured you guys could help. [​IMG] So here's the deal:
    I'm looking to spend around $1,800 or so.
    My viewing distance will be about 6-8 feet in a basement that is 28 X 12.
    I'll be playing lotsa Xbox games on it and am worried about burn-in issues with RPTVs.
    My main signal is regular cable. I'd like a high-def set, but a built in HD tuner isn't necesary at this point.
    I'll also be watching lotsa DVDs on it as well, so I'm leaning towards a 16:9 set as opposed to a 4:3. My wife and I will also be watching quite a bit of regular TV shows on it as well, so I'm concerned about how bad the stretch modes are on 16:9 TVs.
    I'd really like a 16:9 set, but with my short viewing distance and game playing, I don't know how practical a RPTV set would be. I know there are 38 inch 16:9 tubes out there, but they are out of my price range. Would I get more picture with a 36 inch 4:3 set in widescreen than I would a 30 inch 16:9 set?
    Also, I see some 4:3 sets have "enhanced 16:9" modes and "16:9 compression". What is this all about?
    Thanks in advance for you advice and input.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    The modes in effect turn the 4:3 monitors into 16:9 monitors by compressing the entire scanning line raster into a 16:9 shape. The resulting black bars above and below the 16:9 window are dead space.
     
  3. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    There are two 30”, 16:9 tubes in your price range: Samsung (several models) and Panasonic (more expensive than Samsung, but below your limit). Careful shopping (and/or another $100–$200) could get you a 34” 16:9 direct view set (Toshiba, Sony, Panasonic), which can be found for just over $2,000—and I’ve noticed some posting claiming sales where these sets are under $2,000.
     
  4. Evan Hartnett

    Evan Hartnett Stunt Coordinator

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