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TV off "but not really off"

Discussion in 'Displays' started by zecarioca, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. zecarioca

    zecarioca Auditioning

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    I just purchased a plasma TV. I have a cable box linked into the component inputs. I notice that if I am watching TV and then turn off the cable box (but not the TV), the screen goes blank and dark, but does the screen does not "shut" itself off completely. If you completely darken the room, you can notice that some light is being emitted from the screen.

    If the TV had no inputs and you turned it on, you get a brief message stating "no input signal" and then the screen goes completely blank, just the same as if the TV was turned off. In a dark room, you can see there is no light emitted from the screen.

    My question is the following: I recently went on vacation for one week, and when I came back, I noticed the TV had been on the whole time, in effect emitting that very dark signal into the screen (the first situation I described). Could this have affected anything on the TV, maybe akin to a uniform dark burn-in or something similar?
     
  2. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Second Unit

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    Unless the TV is plugged into the cable box there's no reason that the TV will turn off when the cable box is turned off. Or at least none that I know of will turn off on the basis of no input signal.

    It's wasting some power a might shorten the life of the panel roughly by that number of hours but I can't think of any reason it would do any real harm to the display.
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I can't speak for the electronics but in the condition you describe there is definitely no "burn in" (uneven phosphor wear) taking place.

    Phosphor wear is caused solely by high heat which in turn is produced when the phosphors are excited intensely.
     

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