TV for someone who's legally blind

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Bradstreet, Sep 29, 2001.

  1. Bill Bradstreet

    Bill Bradstreet Stunt Coordinator

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    My wife (who is legally blind) has been talking to someone online who is also legally blind. Contrary to what some people believe, blind people do care about TVs. ;-)
    Her friend has a cabinet that can handle a 37"-wide TV and needs to find a TV that he can watch.
    He has some sight, but he has a condition that makes his brain tire by watching the pixels get painted. Of course he can't discern the pixels, but his brain can. So, after a few minutes watching TV he gets a headache.
    I figure he needs some type of TV that paints the image in a different manner. If I understand traditional TVs, they scan the pixels to paint them. I believe a plasma screen does something different (that's why a laptop screen can be filmed easier than a TV monitor right?).
    Any ideas? I don't think this person is looking to spend tons of dough on a TV like he would for a plasma. I'm just hoping to offer him some direction in his search.
    On a similar vein, I have been talking to my wife about what she needs for a TV. She has some sight (20 over 600-800 in both eyes). She thinks a bigger TV would solve her problem! So, I'm going to continue to do my search. I'd love to get a 65-incher, but I think I'm going to be looking in the 43-57 range. :)
     
  2. Dave Dahl

    Dave Dahl Stunt Coordinator

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    Would a DLP projector be useful in this situation?
    Dave
     
  3. Bill Bradstreet

    Bill Bradstreet Stunt Coordinator

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    DLP is what I thought about too. LCD probably as well. I'm hoping someone will come up with something that the guy can afford. :-( Seems like an unrealistic request, but I had to ask because my wife asked. :)
     
  4. Eric Samonte

    Eric Samonte Screenwriter

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    I take it u have tried Low Vision specialist? These optometrist or ophthalmologist may have answers for your wife and her friend. I don't know exactly what their condition is but I know for sure those guys can find a way for them to watch TVs. They may even know what types are viable options.
    ------------------
    Eric Samonte
    Dito sa Pilipinas..may Hom Tiyeter rin kami!
     
  5. Brandon_T

    Brandon_T Screenwriter

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    Hello,
    You may want to try a device by Sony called glasstron. They usally run about $650.00 or so. My grandfather was legally blind and I got him a set to try. He normally wore something similar to binoculars on his face to see the tv and these helped. They look like a virtual reality set that you wear on your head. It uses two lcd screens up close to your face and it then looks like a 50in. screen. Just a thought. I have tried them a couple of times. For home theater use, I would say it is more of a fun factor, not for serious use. However, for something like this you may want to look into it.
    Brandon
     
  6. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Here is where progressive scan might make a big improvement!
    THe flicker normally present in regular (interlaced) NTSC is more annoying to some people than others and speeding up the painting of the pixels may be just the thing needed to eliminate the annoyance here.
    As a test, set your computer to regular 640 x 480 VGA, 60 Hz refresh rate, and view that screen while using the mouse to slowly move a large window about the screen. If this is still a lot more comfortable, progressive scan is the answer.
    Alternatively, go to a TV store and watch a TV doing 480p, to see if it is mor comfortable. Not all LCD and DLP models have true 480p in terms of lack of flicker, watch several brands if you are interested in this technology that makes TV sets less heavy.
    Try different viewing distances. If you are looking at a HDTV doing 108i, and sitting far away reduces the discomfort but sitting close is needed to take in the view, what you need is defocusing the electron beam slightly (service menu or rear panel screwdriver adjustments, not the sharpness control) to reduce flicker even more. (This part for HDTV only)
    Also try different brightness and contrast settings starting with low contrast.
    Don't worry about all the talk about progressive DVD players yet, what you want to look for in a TV is broadcasts, at least the reasonably strong stations, that are comfortable to look at. If you are basing your decision on progressive scan technical details, sets with Silicon Image (DVDO) de-interlacing chipsets are among the best.
    By the way, nowadays there is no rule about how far away to sit. If you want the illusion of the big screen at the theater, just sit closer.
    Hint: I get very dizzy doing virtual reality (those headsets with tiny screens in them). Also my LCD RPTV appears to refresh itself in interlaced even though it takes in progressive scan input. (Perhaps this is a complex process that might be called temporal dithering to obtain more dark to light shadings, which I will discuss offline with anyone interested) All the more reason to see and view lots of different things before buying.
    Other video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on September 30, 2001 at 09:49 AM]
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on September 30, 2001 at 10:01 AM]
     
  7. Bill Bradstreet

    Bill Bradstreet Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks. I had forgotten about the glasstron glasses. I have a feeling they won't work for my wife. She has a problem with acuity. So, if she sees something small it will be small and fuzzy. I'll mention it for her friend though.
    I told her to tell him to go to a TV store and watch a few options. Progressive scan sounds like it will be the answer in the end.
    My wife has problems reading print because of her astagmus (sp?). This guy has problems with regular TVs because of his. Each person reacts differently making a common solution difficult/impossible.
    My wife seems to like a larger TV screen. I like the idea... I may be able to sit on the couch NEXT to her while watching a movie! ;-)
     
  8. Eric Samonte

    Eric Samonte Screenwriter

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    Nystagmus or astigmatism? The former is when the eyes start to move side to side while the latter is an error of refraction.
    At any rate, I think looking at several types of sets would be best.
    I really would like to know which would work for her and her friend as this may be quite helpful for others..not to mention possibly other patients.
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    Eric Samonte
    Dito sa Pilipinas..may Hom Tiyeter rin kami!
     
  9. Bill Bradstreet

    Bill Bradstreet Stunt Coordinator

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    Nystagmus is the one that's affecting the TV watching. astigmatism applies as well, but isn't as much of a bother for my wife. I've never been good at remembering those descriptions. It doesn't matter to me whether she has sight issues or not.
     
  10. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    If the flicker is part of the problem, I think your acquaintance should probably avoid DLP. Affordable DLP projectors have only 1 module, and they paint the pixels by alternating the colours (using a rotating 3-colour filter, synchronised with the device).
    Cees
     

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