TV as a computer monitor

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Mike L-field, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. Mike L-field

    Mike L-field Agent

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    I am about to buy a new monitor for my PC. It occurs to me that it may be wise to get a 30" or 32" HDTV, and have it do double work as a PC monitor. Does that make sense? If yes, what kind of input must a TV have to also function as a PC monitor? Any recommendations for a particular brand or model TV? Any advice will be appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Kenny_H

    Kenny_H Stunt Coordinator

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    Just a sugesstion, but, I remember Princeton Graphics (www.princetongraphics.com)having a line of monitors called Arcadia that fit that niche. Check their website for more info. I'm sure that there are others companies with a model or two that may have what you need. Also, check out Comp USA for companies. Hope this helps.
     
  3. Richard_H

    Richard_H Auditioning

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    Hi,
    I recently used my Philips 32" pixelplus widescreen as a PC monitor by connecting it via the S-Video connectors on the TV and my GeForce3 Ti 500 graphics card.

    It worked fine - the TV auto-adjusted it's ratios to display as much of the pc screen as possible - I just missed out on about 5 pixels top and bottom. It's great for watching videos off the hard drive or viewing photos.

    However, I had a major problem when the TV started to display large patches of colour distortion - on the right there was a large yellow patch and on the left a red patch! These patches gradually faded once I started watching a movie or switched back to TV.

    I'm not sure if the PC caused the problem or if it's the TV, either way, two Philips 32" WS later and I'm switching to RPTV, and I'm not plugging the PC in to the TV again!
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Computer monitors can display insanely high graphics, that HDTVs often cannot adequately display. You also have to be careful not to send incorrect resolutions and refreshes to an HDTV, as most all consumer-grade displays are NOT multisync, and you can blow things up. Make sure you know exactly what resolutions you are sending to your TV and that they are ok.

    Lastly, don't use a regular TV, as they have horrible resolution compared with even the most measly computer monitors, and things will look horrible.

    If you do computer work, you should probably use a computer monitor, but certainly using a computer as an HTPC to an HDTV can do wonders. Gaming/general computer stuff, you may be a little bothered by the lack of resolution though. Depends.
     
  5. Richard_H

    Richard_H Auditioning

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    Chris, are you saying that although my PC video card outputs via S-Video, it is providing signals that the TV probably can't handle properly and will damage the TV? That sounds nasty to me, and it may be that I've just screwed up two perfectly good TVs! [​IMG]

    Oh well, at least Philips are accepting the TVs back - I always regretted getting only a 32" widescreen ...
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    I was not talking about s-video output.

    You wouldn't want to run s-video, as that's still extremely limiting in the resolution capabilities versus VGA (RGB).
     
  7. Richard_H

    Richard_H Auditioning

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    Oh ok, that makes me feel a bit better - it was probably the TV's fault then :phew:

    As for the resolution - yeah it's not great via S-Video, most text is a bit hard to read, but it's acceptable for the occasional viewing of photos or home video without going to the extra effort of cuting them to CDR.

    Thanks for the input [​IMG]

    Mike, sorry for hijacking your thread.
    "Normal service will be restored as soon as possible" [​IMG]
     
  8. Stephen_Ri

    Stephen_Ri Stunt Coordinator

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    I wouldn't recommend it unless you're planning on setting your HD on a low resolution like 640x480. If you have a good graphics card like most radeons and some of the newer GeForces youy may be able to output HD resolutions like 1080i, but even there consumer grade sets will be too fuzzy to read the text. Plus if your set doesn't accept VGA you'll need a RGB>component adapter converter. Two companies that make industrial-type sets are princeton graphics as mentioned above and monivision. The latter is cheaper but does have quality issues and terribel tech support. In the end I think you'll find that you can get a regular sized PC monitor, capable of very high resolutions, for a fraction of the cost and trouble.
     

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