Tuned to what?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Geoff L, Dec 4, 2001.

  1. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Hi guys,
    A new cabnit has founds it's way to my house... It's built by Carver, and is rather small. Along with this, its ported with an ~{odd sized}~ flaired tube.
    Could one of you *Wizards* of bass, figure the tuneing of this cabnit?
    Judgeing from it's sound, im just guessing, probley around 32 to 34hz. Real chest slammer, killer kick drum, but week on the real low stuff, surley due to the steep roll off.
    The numbers:
    Cabnit volume = 1.65 cubic ft.
    Port size = 2 3/4 inches ~ wierd size
    Tube length flair to flair= 9 5/8 inches
    This is less 10" driver volume and cabnit braceing!
    Thanks much, it's very apreciated! [​IMG]
    Geoff
     
  2. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Anyone, bump....
     
  3. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Thank you Jack,
    There was a site that was Java based that I used to be able to use for quick checks of just such a question, but for some reason it wont function for me anymore. It's still jave based, so don't understand why it dosn't work for me. Humm---
    Jack and others:
    Might you have some ideas for a ~{afforadable 10"incher}~ to be used in a small ported cabnit. Power would be 200 into 4ohms. This plate amp has an adjustable 1-6db gain from 30 to 60 hz. Interesting feature. Both can be adjusted, centered frq and the amount of gain. Also has a seprate switch for subsonic filter, 24 at 15hz
    Back to drivers,
    SV's 10 maybe, though a little more $ than I would like to spend. Have never really looked at the 10" market...
    Ideas everyone????
    Geoff
     
  4. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Geoff,

    In reading your last post I was immediately thinking of the SV10. I'm currently building a sealed 1.5ft^3 enclosure using the SV10 for another forum member. Luckily she's very understanding as progress has been slow. I haven't looked at any ported enclosures for this driver but I'll check it out for you. I really don't know if there is any really competition for the SV10 in it's price range.

    Brian
     
  5. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Thanks Brian,
    I guess I run my lazy butt over thier and grab some params and take a peek too.
    I know this is a excellent built driver, from other postings, but maybe theres a cheap sleeper laying somewhere out there!
    Geoff
     
  6. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Geoff,

    Well I think the best ported enclosure would be 2.5ft^3 tuned to 20Hz. You get an F3 of 20Hz and just under 104dB with 200W input power. Max SPL is just under 106dB from about 28Hz and up. The down side is you'd need a 4" port about 31" long. Maybe this is a good candidate for a PR design?

    The only thing that I can think of that might be cheaper would be one of the Blueprint 1001 drivers. Xmax is slightly lower (12mm vs. 16mm) but it only costs $69.

    Brian
     
  7. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Sounds interesting Jack!!!
    Brian,I certainly like that SV though!!!
    Jack,
    I swear that my PE flyers and catalogs just walk off!!! I went and looked in my perfectly cataloged area, Yeh right, and of course it's not there... Not to mention another new one that came with my last order, some replacment 4 inch drivers for my parents speaker repair.... So thats two of the latest PE flyers I can't find...
    hummm ~ Well, they turn up and I'll take a look.
    Thanks again guys for the suggestions.
    Geoff
     
  8. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Geoff,

    You can put the SV10 in a 2ft^3 tuned to 25Hz also. You end up with a 2dB peak around 30-32Hz and then response drops off sharply. SPL at the 2dB peak is 108dB with about 99dB at 20Hz. I have no idea how this compares to the Titanic 10 in the same box though.

    Jack,

    Dammit, I haven't gotten the new PE catalog yet! I even received an order last week and they sent me the old catalog!

    Brian
     
  9. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Jack,
    All I can say is HOLY SHIT!!! [​IMG]
     
  10. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Mama-Mia, that's a nice-a lookin'-a sub! I don't NEED another project, but if it's introduced at a sale price, can I resist? Must try...must try. Remember boy, you're working on a low-cost Bose-beater 8". Whew, I'm okay now...I think.
     
  11. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    This is just a heads up for people......

    One important thing in the design of a good sub driver is having a VERY stiff cone. Poly cones are not inherently as stiff as some of the other cone materials. This means that when driven hard, cone 'break up' occurrs and the sound quality suffers.

    The Titanic drivers have poly cones...

    Exotic material cones; metal, fiberglass, carbon fiber, kevlar, and composite designs using these materials are much stiffer. Therefore the driver can be driven much harder = louder and will suffer less from the cone break issues.

    This is an especially important issue when considering 10" drivers, that will be worked much harder than a larger diameter drivers. There are very few if any reasonably priced 10" drivers made with exotic material cones. So if a person can live with a 12" cone, there are far better choices available.
     
  12. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

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    The new ones have a different cone, it looks like. In fact, they appear to be similar to the original Titanics in name only. Based on a few Unibox models, they look decent, but nothing revolutionary. They look like they might be intended for the autosound market.

     
  13. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Oh! ok, well I hope so. They certainly look like the same old poly cone.
    If the text is correct then that's probably a very good driver. My only complaint with those drivers has been the cone material.
    IMO they should then change the name. That way the old associations won't exist [​IMG]
     
  14. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Well my bad....
    I've ignored the Titanic for so long that I completely missed the MKII designs. The specs are indeed impressive. Looks like Paul and the boys at PE have a winner... [​IMG]
     
  15. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Thomas,
    Would you say that heavy, paper cones are superior to poly cones?
     
  16. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Brian

    Yes I would for subs.

    Jon Marsh and I did freelance driver design for a while. We found that poly just didn't cut it. It's great for car audio because the mineral filled (black) versions hold up to the temperature extremes. And it's very easy to form into compound shapes, so making a curvilinear driver is a piece of cake. But personally I think it has the poorest sonics of any cone material.

    My choices for cone materials are Kevlar, carbon fiber, metal, composite sandwiches, and pulp.

    And if the choice for an inexpensive driver is between poly and pulp I'll always choose pulp.

    Just so people don't get confused 'paper' cones are a pulp mixture. The best ones have a relatively high wool content.
     

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