Tubes vs. Projection

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Jeremy Scott, Jul 13, 2003.

  1. Jeremy Scott

    Jeremy Scott Second Unit

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    I have narrowed my new tv choices down to a couple.
    1 is a Sony 32" Trinitron Vega HDTV for $1300
    the other is a 42" Toshiba HDTV model 42H83

    the sony is a tube 4:3 screen and weighs about 200+ pounds.

    the toshiba is 16:9 and weighs about 130 pounds.

    I want to get a projections but a few people have told me to look out for them because the color fades after awhile.
    please clear this for me

    i want to get a 16:9 screen because by 2006 all broadcasting will be 16:9 right?

    Tubes do come in 16:9 but sony vega is $2200+

    Any have anythign good or bad to say about the sony32" hdtv or the toshiba 42" hdtv, please let me know.

    also, who knows the TRUE future of HDTV, what i mean is are all hdtv's gonna be good by themselves come 2006 or are they still gonna need a special tuner to add to them.

    thanks.
     
  2. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    The color will fade on any CRT based television (RPTV or tube based) if you drive the CRT too hard. If you keep it cranked on "torch" mode (often the setting from the factory), you shorten the life of the phosphors and the guns. This is also frowned upon because the factory "torch" mode is not an accurate color/contrast/brightness setting and is not conducive to home theater. The people you've talked to probably had an older RPTV, which were not a bright as today's, and kept it set on the factory "torch" mode for the life of the set. This is bad, bad, bad.

    Calibrate your RPTV with a good calibration disk and don't keep static images on it for too long and your RPTV should last you 10 or more years. They are the best bang for your buck when it you compare picture size, HDTV and/or picture quality.
     
  3. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Stunt Coordinator

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    I would say get the projection TV. It's more for your money and I have talked to a lot of people on the subject prior to buying mine and fading is no bigger a problem than it is for a tube TV.
     
  4. Jeremy Scott

    Jeremy Scott Second Unit

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    now how do you calibrate most these tv's?

    do you do it through the menu options on the screen, or do you physically ahve to get in the tv and do something?

    you mentioned something about a disk for calibrating and what exactly do you mean static images?

    please explain.
     
  5. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    There is no need to get inside the TV for calibration. Calibration consists of coverging the guns so they all display in the same way and adjusting the picture so the contrast/brightness/color and tint levels are correct. Both these and convergence are available from the regular user menu. A system level convergence is recommended but not necessary, but it requires entry into the service meny. There are websites with detailed directions for this service menu convergence.

    The recommended disks for calibration are Avia, Video Essentials and S&V. Calibration and calibration disks are discussed at length in the Primer available in the Basics section.

    Note: this calibration is not just for RPTV's. It is recommended that you calibrate any TV - tube, CRT projection, plasma etc. It makes picture more filmlike, relieves eyestrain, improves color and makes mounds and mounds of julienne fries! (Well maybe not mounds and mounds).

    Static images are any images that do not move or change, usually produced by video games (i.e. power bar displays). These can burnin to a CRT based television, epsecially RPTV's. If you leave them on for too long and your TV is set too high in contrast or brightness, they can burn into the phosphors. Calibration is a must for TV's used for video games. Calibrate to get the contrast down, vary your viewing habits and don't leave a video game paused for hours and you should be fine.
     
  6. Jeremy Scott

    Jeremy Scott Second Unit

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    now another thing about projection tvs.

    i just got home from another store, and viewing a rptv from an angle sucks.......atleast in stores they do.

    is it the way they are made, or the light from other objects.

    i can see if i am sitting dorectly in front of the tv, but if you got a bunch of people over watchign a football game or something, would it suck to view the tv at an angle.

    i am still debating wheather to go rptv or sony vega trinitron hdtv.
    i want a big picture but i want a nice picture from all angles also.
     
  7. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Stunt Coordinator

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    It's the lighting in the stores. You can see a good RPTV from any normal viewing angle from which you would likely be sitting to watch TV.
     
  8. Agustin

    Agustin Agent

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    if you want angles go CRT Tubes, they dont look ugly, but check some samsung rptv set, they come with more viewing area angle
     
  9. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    The viewing angle for RPTV's is not that bad in the horizontal, just less than a tube. Viewing angle is worse in the vertical, you have to be about eye level with the vertical. When you try out the TV, try to sit in front of them, do not stand (who stands up when they watch TV?). This will allow you to judge the picture in real world conditions and I assure you the viewing angle is wider in the horizontal when you sit down in front of the TV. I've never had a problem with large crowds viewing an RPTV, either at my place, my mother's or my brother's. We all own Toshiba widescreen RPTV's. Besides, if you are viewing from an extreme angle, the picture is not going to be easily viewed no matter what the source, simply because it distorts the picture.
     

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