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True Difference In Component Cable Brands?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon Van Dalen, Oct 12, 2001.

  1. Jon Van Dalen

    Jon Van Dalen Auditioning

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    I am using s-video for my dvd player which looks rgeat to me, really, but I am going to change it at this point to a component cable. I don't even expect any real difference in video quality, but mainly the reason is that both my dvd player and dreamcast are using s-video, and thuse I need to use an annoying switch.
    I would, however, like to gain as much as I can out of switching to component. I have tried basic crappy dubbing cables just to test the component jacks and it works just fine, and looks as good as s-video. What I mean is I used A/V dubbing cables (because nothing else was available) and the picture looked really as good as I have seen it with s-video.
    So the question is, why do monster and bettercables sell basic 1 meter cables for up to $100 if I can get a quality I seem to find as good as s-video with crappy dubbing cables from radio shack? (they weren't even the good ones) Should I buy a moderately priced component cable like acoustic research or for some reason get a $65 or $100 one? Of course, I did not test a lot of material or even look very very closely at the results. I only have a 20" tv (the new toshiba flat one) and I was actually trying this on a 27" tv before.
    One thing I'd like to fix is that subtitles, particularly the white ones) tend to shimmer a little with s-video. Not like composite dot-crawl type shimmering, but just a flickering like a low refresh rate on a monitor. They are very sharp.
    Jon
     
  2. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    Although I usually recomnd people use the highest level cables they can and to use component if offered I don't think you're going to see the gains that people with larger sets do. Would you gain by moving to say a nice set of catcable componment cables vs your current s-video? Likely but IMO I'm not sure its a wise investment..at least right now. Now if you were planning on upgrading to a larger set in the future then buying a reference quality cable might make sense but for now I'd say spend the money elsewhere
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  3. Jim A. Banville

    Jim A. Banville Supporting Actor

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    Unless the cable is "broken", you won't see a difference between shielded coaxial video cables. I suggest going to Radio Shack and picking up 3 coaxial shielded video cables for less than $10/each (they are solid black in color, have RCA plugs and are in a bag) and use them. You won't be missing anything. They aren't even Gold-Plated! [​IMG]
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    I have to second Andrew on this one.
    Home Theater magazine came up with these numbers based on a reference 50" RPTV:
    Composite - baseline quality
    SVideo - 20% better than Composite
    Component - 25% better than Composite
    They noted that larger displays show MORE improvement, smaller displays LESS.
    So I dont think its a wise investment for your 20" tube TV. It would be fractional improvement.
     

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