triggered switch

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by wade_g, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. wade_g

    wade_g Auditioning

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    I am looking for info on setting up a triggered switch for a component that cannot receive a low-voltage trigger from my receiver. I.e., a stand-alone triggered switch or similar. Several forum searches and googles have not helped (probably not using the proper terminology for the items I need). Can anyone point me to info or a more appropriate forum for the question? I posted a similar question in HT Construction, Interiors & Automation. Thank you.
     
  2. josephMag

    josephMag Auditioning

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    so your receiver puts out a signal that you want to control another component with? I don't understand.
     
  3. wade_g

    wade_g Auditioning

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    Yes. 12V trigger signal from receiver. Certain amps have trigger input that can be controlled directly. In my case, I want to turn on an older receiver (using it as my zone 2 amp) when the main receiver zone 2 is activated. I've seen triggered AC outlets in the past, but cannot recall where I saw them or how to find them. A line-level sensing outlet would also work.
     
  4. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    Somebody makes a 12v-triggerable power strip. I just can't remember who.

    I would just log on to Newark or Digikey and get a 12V DPST or DPDT relay with 5-10A contacts (depending on how beefy your zone2 receiver is). Probably cost you less than 5 bucks. If you get the kind with spade terminals, there's no soldering required --you'd just need some female spade lugs and a plug and socket (buy an extension cord and cut it in half) to hook it up.

    You can also get such a relay from Radio Shack, but it will be more like $8.
     
  5. DavidLW

    DavidLW Stunt Coordinator

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  6. wade_g

    wade_g Auditioning

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    Thanks for the responses. I decided to take Dave's suggestion and just build a simple switched outlet box. Don't know why I didn't consider it before.

    The need for instant gratification led me to buy the parts at Rat Shack rather than order online for perhaps quite a bit less money, but it made for a good evening project for me and my kids. Pretty simple: standard duplex receptacle and general purpose relay w/ 12V coil mounted in a 2-1/2"x4"x6" project box with a short a/c pigtail. Also put a 1/8" mono jack in the box rather than hardwiring the low voltage line. The box is black plastic, so black duplex and cover plate would have been nice, but I settled for dark brown readily available at HD. Also, it could be done in a smaller box, but again, I took what was on the shelf. Two 1/8" mono plugs and a length of 24 ga. cable for the low voltage line completed the setup. Parts for the switch box ran a little under $30, and the low-voltage cable was about $8 more. The $30 compares to $80+ for a Xantech unit someone in the HT Construction forum told me about--and I was about to order.

    DavidLW, the Smart Strip sounds like a useful product, but wouldn't help in my case because the 2nd zone amp (receiver) I'm switching is remote from my main receiver, and plugging them into a common power strip would be impractical.
     
  7. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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  8. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    Sounds like you're all set.

    A couple of quick things:

    1) Make sure that the trigger output of your receiver is rated for at least as much current as the relay coil - some of the trigger outputs I've seen are only good for 200mA or so.

    2) I'm not fond of 1/8" plugs for power, because if the male part is "hot", it will get shorted when you insert or remove it (comedians, insert clever sexual innuendo reply at this point). Best to make all connections before powering everything up.

    Have fun!
     

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