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Tributes To Your Favorite Classic TV Stars (1 Viewer)

The 1960's

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This thread is for the express purpose of paying tribute to your favorite Classic Television Stars. It can be on their Birthday or the Anniversary of their passing or it can be at whatever time you are thinking about them. Express your love through text and photos and videos. Discuss their bios, favorite performances, comedic flair, dramatic versatility, their beauty and their charm. Hopefully this will include not just the big stars but the hundreds upon hundreds of character actors who’s faces we know, but who’s names have been long since forgotten. Any classic television star which has been memorable to you through the decades.

As always, feedback and comments from members are strongly encouraged and welcomed. Please try to keep your thoughts and comments focused on the stars and creative personnel being discussed here, avoid double postings, and also remember to stay positive and respectful. There's no reason to get into any discussions as to why you don’t like someone’s choices. This is a time to celebrate, not to denigrate.

Your cooperation in keeping the discourse in this thread civil and on point is much appreciated. Thank you!​
 

The 1960's

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Happy 94th Birthday George Maharis!!!

It is indeed incredible that in 2022, George Maharis is still living, at the ripe old age of 94 - more than 60 years after his groundbreaking role as Buz Murdock on Route 66. Happy Birthday, Mr. Maharis, wherever you are...and thanks for all the memories! You can read all about him here and here. Feel free to add your thoughts to the celebration!

Route 66 (1960-1964)

S03E04 Ever Ride the Waves in Oklahoma? (Oct.12.1962)
Stars Martin Milner George Maharis Jeremy Slate Romney Tree Bruce Watson Ron Kipling James Westmoreland Anthony De Mario Dolores Michaels

Only recently have I come to appreciate this one. It is a unique episode in that it is told in flashback sequences. Not a common occurrence for Route 66 and not something I’ve ever warmed up to. But it works here. When a young surfer Jimmy Mills (Bruce Watson) is killed while trying to emulate his hero “The King”, Hob Harrell (Jeremy Slate), Buz becomes infuriated by his lack of empathy over his death and becomes obsessed with making him “care”. Eventually he becomes convinced the only way to do so is by beating him at his own game, surfing. It is a powerful Maharis acting performance and perhaps one his best ever with a great cast of supporting characters including the hippy-like surfer girl chick Debbie (Romney Tree) and Medrith (the elegant Dolores Michaels).

Other favorite George Maharis episodes are S02E01 A Month of Sundays (Sep.22.1961), S02E04 Birdcage On My Foot (Oct.13.1961) and S02E07 The Mud Nest (Nov.10.1961)


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Jeff Flugel

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Happy birthday to George Maharis, who turns 94 years old today. He found the role of his career on the excellent early ‘60s drama Route 66, playing Buz Murdock, the fiery, restless yin to the solid, slightly more staid yang of his pal in the ever-wandering Corvette, Tod Stiles. The intense, Method-trained Maharis famously had a complicated falling-out with the producers of the series early in its third season, eventually leaving the show for pastures new. Unfortunately, Maharis’ post-Route 66 career never quite took off like it should have, despite a brief flirtation with movie stardom - most notably, including a prominent role in the 1965 John Sturges thriller The Satan Bug, and later, as the chief villain in the gory but rambunctious 1983 fantasy film The Sword and the Sorcerer. Nevertheless, he remained active throughout the subsequent decades, guest starring in various films and television shows, racking up dozens of credits until his retirement from the business in the early ‘90s, including appearances on Night Gallery, Cade’s County, Cannon, Mission: Impossible, Barnaby Jones, Marcus Welby, McMillan & Wife, Ellery Queen, The Bionic Woman, Kojak, Police Story, Switch, Matt Houston and Murder, She Wrote…not to mention a whopping six times on Fantasy Island. He also released several pop albums and singles throughout the ‘60s, as well as posing for Playgirl magazine in 1973. Later, he began a second career as an Impressionist painter, and according to Wikipedia, was still actively painting as of 2008, splitting his time between New York and Los Angeles.

In tribute to this fine actor, I present the following review, one of nine performances he gave which aired in 1974.

Movin’ On – 1.7 “The Good Life”

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Not all of Mr. Maharis’ TV guest-star turns were deserving of his obvious talents (Superboy, anyone?), but it seems apparent that he responded to the material given him in the following episode, with a script by George Kirgo ( father of Julie Kirgo of Twilight Time fame). Perhaps Maharis felt some kind of kinship with this show, a spiritual ancestor to his own ground-breaking 1960s series. For whatever reason, he channels some of that old Buz Murdock fire and gives a strong performance here.

Good-natured truck drivers Sonny Pruitt (Claude Akins) and Will Chandler (Frank Converse) get a taste of high-class living in a typically fun and freewheeling episode of this ‘70s big rig riff on Route 66-style travelogue drama. Maharis co-stars as hard-driving, hard-partying wildcat oil driller Harry Lorimer, who dreams of a big strike in the dusty fields near Boise, Idaho. Sonny and Will, delivering a load of pipe casings to the drill site, are on hand when Harry, the kind of boss who likes to get his hands dirty working alongside his crew, receives an accidental electric shock. Good Samaritans Sonny and Will swing into action, clambering up the derrick tower and rescuing Harry (Akins even performs mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on Maharis in this scene!)

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A grateful Harry, thinking Sonny and Will are good luck, offers the boys $1000 per week apiece to join his crew, while Harry’s dad, Paul (Gary Merrill, wonderfully wrinkled and wry), a former oil man himself turned retired geology teacher, warns Sonny and Will to turn the job down, hoping to save them from…what? Disillusionment? The eventual rot which sets in after too many years living the soft life? But when Harry’s checks don’t bounce, Sonny and Will are tempted enough by his offer to stick around and give it a try. They soon they find themselves tasked with entertaining – and on Harry’s request, stalling - Joan (lovely Laraine Stephens), an attractive big money investor from Los Angeles.

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It seems Harry, despite his high-flying lifestyle, ensconced at the local country club, has sunk all his own cash into the enterprise and is coasting on financial fumes. He needs an injection of investment cash pronto, and he’s banking on getting it from Joan. Living by the creed “Go big or go home,” Harry throws a lux masquerade party at the country club. Despite her attraction for straight-shooting big lug Sonny, Jane is one sharp cookie and senses something is not quite kosher. But Harry is one of those big dreaming businessmen who go by their gut, seemingly able to wrangle success out of life by sheer force of will.

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Maharis shows the serious side of Harry in a couple of scenes, where he lays out his passionate drive to keep drilling. To his skeptical and worried father: “I’m talking about a fortune pouring out of that hole – for all of us! Faith. Oil is faith, Pop. Faith. Faith. (Pointing to his chest) In here.”

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And later, in a heart-to-heart with Will: “This is the place. There’s oil down there. I know it. I know it.” And when Will tells Harry that others, including Paul, disagree, and think the well is dry, Harry calmly but confidently proclaims, “I gotta go with me. It’s all I got.”

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This episode is a hard one to write about, as not a huge amount happens, really. It’s kind of about nothing, and yet somehow, is also rather profound, in its own, very mellow way. And that’s appropriate, since Movin’ On is, in general, far more chilled-out and light-hearted in feel than Route 66. It often lacks the heavy dramatic fireworks of its predecessor, but that’s also one of Movin’ On’s attractive qualities. Events feel loose and low-key, with situations and behavior that come across real and naturalistic. Nothing seems overly forced, and what’s sacrificed in tight, fast-moving plotting is compensated by the sensation of watching likable adults dealing with various true-to-life situations in complex, adult ways. And this loose structure is underpinned by the solid moral core of its two leads. Tough Korean War vet and experienced trucker, Sonny, and his younger, Ivy League-educated partner, Will, are both good men. They might be living the vagabond lifestyle, but they never fail to help out people in need, often going way out of their way to do so. Here, we get a chance to see both men get a sip of the high life, but in the end, they are wise enough to know that that sort of lifestyle, with its glittering swimming pools, constantly flowing champagne and sleek, expensive towels, is just not for them. At least, not for the long term. “We don’t belong,” Will says at one point. And so our two working-class heroes keep movin’ on, as the catchy Merle Haggard theme song says, down those “white lines” that are the “lifeline of the nation.”

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JohnHopper

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GEORGE MAHARIS SPECIAL

ROD SERLING’S NIGHT GALLERY SEASON 2

Episode #1

“The Hand of Borgus Weems”
written by Alvin Sapinsley
short story by George Langelaan
directed by John M. Lucas
cinematography by Lionel Lindon
music by Oliver Nelson
guests: George Maharis, Ray Milland, Joan Huntington, Patricia Donahue, Peter Mamakos, William Mims, Bob Hoy

“Exoriare aliquis nostris ex ossibus ultor.” (Arise from my bones, my unknown avenger)
—Virgil’s Aeneid.

A desperate man named Peter Lacland (George Maharis) seeks help from a surgeon (Ray Milland) when he finds one of his hands has developed a murderous mind of its own.

It’s a fun horror segment that relies heavily on the shoulder of actor George Maharis and on the eerie electronic music of composer Oliver Nelson. Most of the segment is told by the voice-over of George Maharis as a narrator of his own life. I remembered that segment from the Seventies era.

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JohnHopper

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON JUN 2, 2022

GEORGE MAHARIS SPECIAL

TELEFILM

The Victim (1972)
written by Merwin Gerard
story by McNight Malmar
directed by Herschel Daugherty (Thriller)
produced by William Frye (Thriller)
music by Gil Mellé (Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Columbo, Kolchak: The Night Stalker)
with
Elizabeth Montgomery (Bewitched)
Eileen Heckart
Sue Ane Langdon
George Maharis (Route 66)
Jess Walton
Richard Derr
Ross Elliott

A creepy and atmospheric mystery/whodunit/huit-clos in a country house. A variation on a Thriller segment entitled “The Storm” (also directed by Herschel Daugherty).

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GEORGE MAHARIS SPECIAL

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE SEASON 7

Episode #17

“The Fountain”
written by Stephen Kandel
directed by Barry Crane
produced by Barry Crane
cinematography by Ronald W. Browne

Cast and details:
• Old mob executive Thomas Bachman played by George Maharis
• Young mob executive Matthew Drake with a crippled hand played by Cameron Mitchell
• Drake’s henchman Dawson (with long hair, sideburns and sunglasses) played by Luke Askew (returning from the season 3 “The Execution”)
• Drake’s Mexican informant Perez played by Carlos Riva
• Criminal smuggler pilot Mallory played by Ed Connelly
• The village bartender played by Pepe Callahan (returning from the season 5 “The Hostage” but first seen in the season 4 “Commandante”)
• The waitress played by Charlita

After his failed assassination attempt on Matthew Drake who is now crippled and therefore sends his henchmen to avenge, exiled in the Mexican mountain village of Reyoso and brought back to Los Angeles by Barney for $3,000, fifty four years old Thomas Bachman is fooled by the IMF that makes him believe in the fountain of youth throughout a sect known as The Fellowship of the Golden Circle in a Northern Mexico mansion in order to locate the stolen archives of the organization.

Comments:
Actor George Maharis was trained at the Actor’s Studio and is best-remembered as the leading character of “Route 66” (1960-1963). Actor Cameron Mitchell was a 1950’s supporting actor and had his television series: “The High Chaparral” (1967-1971) and “The Swiss Family Robinson” (1975-1976). The crippled hand of Drake is so stiff that it can be the one of a foe from “The Wild Wild West”: see “The Night of the Iron Fist”. Actor Luke Askew started his career as a supporting actor in the late 1960’s cinema but is only known for his appearance on “Easy Rider” and is a recurring figure of the 1970’s television. As usual, minor characters receive no credits: the clerks and the two henchmen in the secret computer room in the prologue, the three believers of the mansion, police Lt. Cooper and his officers at the end of Act 4. As in “Encore” and “Two Thousand”, one IMFer (Casey) injects some paraffine under the face of the foe (Bachman). As in “Run for the Money”, the mob uses computers and the prologue ends with an assassination attempt executed with a time bomb hidden in a briefcase. As in “Boomerang”, a gangster steals documents from his partners and escapes to blackmail the organization. As in some season 7 episodes (“Leona”, “Cocaine”), a foe (Drake) smokes cigarillos. As in “The Deal” (written by Stephen Kandel), the foe launches a full-scale search by airplane. As in “TOD-5”, a foe (Bachman) introduces himself with an alternate name: Mr. Smith (see Jim in “The Question”, also written by Stephen Kandel). The prologue shows again as in season 6 (“Blind”, “Trapped”) that the underworld works as modern financiers and Drake proves it by saying: “The Executive Committee has a meeting. The feeling is that your organization is in trouble.” As in “The Puppet”, there’s a generation conflict but unlike it, the old school fights back. As in the season 6 “The Connection”, the same mansion is used. The Mexican village lot is recycled from the season 4 “Commandante” and used again for the season 5 “The Rebel”, Drake’s Beverly Hills residence is recycled from the season 5 “Squeeze Play” and Drake’s office is recycled from the season 6 “Image” and the season 7 “Leona” (Mike Apollo’s restaurant) and “The Puppet” (The Ruxton Hotel room). The computer room of the gangster is Dr. Flory’s one from “TOD-5” and the underground concrete corridor is from “Kidnap”. Barney as a wounded man foreshadows a season 7 “Mannix” episode untitled “Climb a Deadly Mountain”. The automatic rifle used by hit man Dawson is recycled from the season 6 “Invasion” and “Run for the Money” and the season 7 “Ultimatum”. The apartment scene reminds the good old days of season 2 because Jim is wearing his classic outfit, i.e., black sweater, white shirt and grey slacks.

Review:
Find an average mob power struggle story and a pot-pourri of previous eternal youth episodes combined with sect spirituality: "The Visitors" (see the obsessive hygienist gangster a la Edward Granger that Jim describes during the apartment scene: “he’s a fanatic about diet and exercice”; Casey as the dead aging lady wearing an oddball outfit: the same showy “mummy” makeup is used; the same three IMFers dressed in white) that is artificially enhanced by the intrusion of the fantastic element but it can be filed between "The Elixir" (see the analogy with Cinnamon’s part as Candy Carlton in which we learn her identity in a history book) and "Encore" (replace Thomas Bachman by Thomas Kroll: both have the same showy oldman makeup) because of the old gangster turning young. This is the ninth episode that critizes blind beliefs and superstition: the fortune-telling in “The Psychic”, the astrology in “The Astrologer”, the ESP in “Mastermind”, the mystic healer in “The Choice”, the occult in “Cat’s Paw”, the UFO in “The Visitors”, the Tarot in “Image”, the Voodoo in “Incarnate” and, here, esotericism (an egalitarian and secret sect of immortals who meditate endlessly). As in the season 6 “The Connection” (also directed by Barry Crane) and, later, in part, the season 7 “Incarnate” (also directed by Barry Crane and written by Stephen Kandel), one IMFer smuggles the foe by plane, drugs him during the flight and leads him to a mansion. Music-wise, we can hear a sweet melody coming from a music box during Act 2 (Bachman and Barney ask for some help from the believers) and Act 3 (in the library, Casey is looking at herself through the mirror).

This tape will self-destruct in five seconds…
 

ScottRE

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Thanks, guys for all of the great George Maharis posts. I didn't have anything to contribute, but I may seek out "Movin' On" because it looks pretty good.

I'm gonna join this thread with a quick tribute to Lloyd Bochner. The man was almost literally everywhere over the dial for decades, doing any kind of show. Probably most famous to genre fans for his performance in the classic Twilight Zone episode "To Serve Man," he also showed up on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea a few years later. He did two episodes, but the first one solidified my love of this series.

Bochner plays a traitorous saboteur who had an experimental fear gas pumped into the air system of the submarine Polidor, which Admiral Nelson was having tested. The gas sent the crew into a panic which led to the sub's destruction with all hands lost. Believing himself to blame, Nelson insists on going to the scene of the disaster and determining the cause. Bochner and Edgar Bergen (of the Charlie McCarthy act and father of Candice) are assigned by the government to act as phycological experts who can abort the dive if warranted. Bochner pumps the gas into the Seaview's air revitalizing system and tries to convince Nelson to abort. When Bochner learns that the fear gas breaks down into a deadly nerve gas, he succumbs to his own fears, and warns Nelson. Vindicated, and after some effort, the Seaview regains control and returns home.

This episode is one of the best of the series. A solid cold war / submarine suspense drama with great atmosphere, direction, and most of all, performances. Basehart is at the top of his game and his work in this episode was the final straw that got me to love this series. His emotional reactions to the disaster and then his vindication are a masterclass in acting. Hedison also turns in fantastic work.

But this isn't about them.

Bochner is incredibly good here. Coming off ingratiating and friendly at first, the handsome young actor gradually becomes more manipulative until he lapses into total panic. He's totally convincing throughout, in control of the role and his measured, well considered performance elevates hit episode in the the upper echelon. This episode is not an guilty pleasure nor does it need any apology or qualification. It's a great episode all around, one of the best of the genre.

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JohnHopper

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My favorite parts with Lloyd Bochner

Thriller: “Prisoner in the Mirror”
The Twilight Zone: “To Serve Man”
Combat!: “Evasion”
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea: “The Fear-Makers”
The Wild Wild West: “The Night of the Puppeteer”
Mission: Impossible: “The Glass Cage”, “Takeover”, “The Deal”
Mannix: “The Girl Who Came in with the Tide”
Gunsmoke: “The Iron Blood of Courage”
The Six Million Dollar Man: “Day of the Robot”
 

The 1960's

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In Memory of Martin Milner December 28, 1931 - September 6, 2015

Today September 6th, 2022 is the 7th anniversary since the passing of Martin Milner.

Today we celebrate his life and remember how much he meant to all of us.



Tributes forthcoming ... Your participation is welcomed.​
 
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The 1960's

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And Now, Mr. Serling:

"Next week I try to sell an argument to the effect that I'm not at my best when writing scripts for women. Miss Vera Miles takes my side in a most unusual and unique story we call 'Mirror Image.' I hope to see you next week, you in your living room, and Miss Vera Miles and the rest of us in
The Twilight Zone."

Cast:

Millicent Barnes:
Vera Miles
Paul Grinstead: Martin Milner
Ticket Taker: Joseph Hamilton
Female Attendant: Naomi Stevens
Husband: Ferris Taylor
Wife: Therese Lyon
Bus Driver: Edwin Rand

Crew:

Writer:
Rod Serling (original teleplay)
Director: John Brahm
Producer: Buck Houghton
Production Manager: Ralph W. Nelson
Director of Photography: George T. Clemens
Art Direction: George W. Davis and William Ferrari
Set Decoration: Henry Grace and Budd S. Friend
Assistant Director: Edward Denault
Casting: Mildred Gusse
Editor: Bill Mosher
Sound: Franklin Milton and Jean Valentino
Music: Stock

Rod Serling's Opening Narration:

"Millicent Barnes, age twenty-five, young woman waiting for a bus on a rainy November night. Not a very imaginative type is Miss Barnes, not given to undue anxiety or fears, or for that matter even the most temporal flights of fancy. Like most young career women, she has a generic classification as a, quote, girl with a head on her shoulders, end of quote. All of which is mentioned now because in just a moment the head on Miss Barnes's shoulders will be put to a test. Circumstances will assault her sense of reality and a chain of nightmares will put her sanity on a block. Millicent Barnes, who in one minute will wonder if she's going mad.

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The 1960's

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Rod Serling's Closing Narration:

"Obscure metaphysical explanation to cover a phenomenon, reasons dredged out of the shadows to explain away that which cannot be explained. Call it parallel planes or just insanity. Whatever it is, you'll find it in
The Twilight Zone."



 

Jeff Flugel

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September 6th marks the anniversary of the death of TV legend Martin Milner, rock-solid leading man and character actor who always brought his A-game to the table, no matter the role, be it stalwart hero, cocksure juvenile, or scheming bad guy. Milner racked up an impressive list of film credits early in his career, in films such as Sands of Iwo Jima, Halls of Montezuma, Operation Pacific, Springfield Rifle, Mister Roberts, Pete Kelly’s Blues, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and Sweet Smell of Success, before transitioning to greater fame on television. His four-season stint as Tod Stiles on the iconic road trip drama Route 66 made him a major TV star, and he cemented that status by scoring the lead as Officer Pete Malloy for eight seasons on fondly-remembered police procedural Adam-12 for producer Jack Webb. Milner finished out his career in the ‘90s with appearances on MacGyver, Murder, She Wrote, Life Goes On and Diagnosis: Murder. Milner, by all accounts a dedicated family man, was also an avid fly-fisherman, and co-hosted a radio show on the sport called “Let Talk Hookup” from 1993 until his death in 2015 at age 83.

I’ve always liked and admired Milner, whose clean-cut, Everyman looks, forthright demeanor and calm authority makes him a reassuring presence on screen. As a tribute, I thought I’d share my thoughts on some of his work as a busy supporting actor, presented here in chronological order:

Science Fiction Theatre – 2.27 “Three Minute Mile”
Milner plays college senior and former star quarterback Britt, who quit the team in order to participate in secretive experiments with Dr. Kendall (Marshall Thompson), which have resulted in Britt gaining superhuman speed and strength. Britt’s fiancée (Gloria Marshall) and a nosy sports reporter (William Henry) start snooping around to find out just what exactly is going on. Milner’s easygoing charm and earnest personality is already clearly on display in this modest yet interesting slice of low-budget ‘50s sci-fi.

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Steve Canyon – 1.12 “Operation Firebee”
Though 12th in production order, this episode was actually the last of the 34 to air in this enjoyable Air Force action drama based on the comics by Milt Caniff, headlined by Dean Fredericks as crack Air Force pilot and troubleshooter, Lt. Col. Steve Canyon. What we've got here is a mash-up of authentic jet fighter stock footage and low-key, on-the-ground dramatics, as Steve takes part in an aerial gunnery competition, wherein pilots try to shoot down guided "firebee" missiles. One such missile, dubbed “Little Looey,” has gained quite a reputation, no pilot having been able to take it out after multiple attempts, and will be retired with honors if “he” survives this final competition. Needless to say, every pilot in the competition dreams to be the one to take Little Looey down. The drone’s chief mechanic, Sgt. Ernest Bigelow (Milner), frets over his baby – especially when he witnesses firsthand Steve’s unerring aim at the skeet shooting range. Look for a young and very beautiful Patricia Blair (later Mrs. Daniel Boone) as one of two female journalists chastising Steve and his pilot pal, Major Woodrow (Richard Crane), during a double date. Also with Hank Worden (incorrectly billed in the credits as “Warden”).

Kraft Suspense Theatre
2.16 “Streetcar, Do You Read Me?”
Sticking with the Air Force pilot theme, Milner receives top billing here above Richard Long, showing how far his profile had risen after his sterling work on Route 66. True to the series’ title, this episode builds up considerable suspense, as an electrical fire during a flight from the U.S. to Spain seriously injures pilot Maj. Ben Dawson (Richard Long), forcing hesitant co-pilot, Lt. John Corby (Milner), who has up to now dodged the responsibility of becoming a lead, to dig deep, find the Right Stuff and overcome his fear of failure in order to successfully accomplish a tricky mid-air refueling and bring the plane down for a safe landing. The production appears to have gotten nearly unprecedented access to the Strategic Air Command program, with lots of impressive (and during the refueling scenes, nail-biting) B-47 bomber footage. This verisimilitude extends to the script, which is peppered with plenty of authentic military lingo. Also with Jack Ging (as the flight navigator), Leif Erickson and Nancy Malone (as Corby’s concerned young wife).

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The Virginian – 3.25 “Timberland”
Bull-headed logging boss, Charlie Daniels (Arch Johnson), is dead set on clear cutting a large swath of land over the protests of several local ranchers, who worry about the resulting watershed damage to their grazing lands. Daniels has brought his pretty daughter, Katherine (Joan Freeman), to Medicine Bow, with long-held notions of her marrying his burly foreman, Paul Rogers (William Smith)...but she has second thoughts when genial rancher's son, Dave Ferguson (Milner), shows an interest in her. Deputy Ryker (Clu Gulager) is stuck in the middle of a rising conflict between the outsider timbermen and the increasingly hostile local cowboys. Things come to a head when Paul attacks Dave and is accidentally killed in the ensuing struggle.

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The extra length of these Virginian episodes (this one clocks in at 77 minutes) can sometimes lead to padding, but in most cases, including this one, this allows time for deeper characterizations and gives a more epic sweep to the storytelling. James Drury shows up briefly in a few scenes, just to make sure viewers remember that its his show we’re watching, but Gulager and the very capable supporting cast keep the drama humming along. Veteran character actor Russell Thorson (who I know best for voicing tough Jack Packard in the second OTR version of I Love a Mystery), his face wrinkled like a walnut, gets a juicy part as Daniels’ longtime right-hand man, Ollie. Further familiar faces include William Bramley, Roy Engel, Norman Levitt, and Gregg Palmer.

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A Man Called Shenandoah
1.32 “Requiem for the Second”
This is a call-back to a previous episode (“Muted Fifes, Muffled Drums”), in which amnesiac badass Shenandoah (Robert Horton) discovers that he was once a Lieutentant serving with the Army's 2nd Regiment at Fort Smith, one of only two survivors of a massacre by Indians there. Now, Army scout Jim Scully (John Cliff), the man instrumental in clearing Shenandoah during the previous episode’s court martial, has tracked down the other survivor, weaselly deserter Neal Henderson (Milner), who has established a new life for himself as a shopkeeper in the interim. Scully calls in Shenandoah, and together they approach Henderson to bring him in, but the man escapes, resulting in a deadly cat-and-mouse duel amid the ruins of Fort Smith. Shenandoah is desperate to talk to Henderson to gain clues about his identity, but, as is the norm for this show, is fated to never get any real answers.

An actor the caliber of Milner is rather overqualified for the part, as he gets few lines, mostly limited to skulking around the abandoned fort. This is in general a strong late period half-hour western drama, but occasionally the scripts are stripped down to a fault, as is the case here. There’s still some good action, and Scully is a cool and believably authentic character, with his bushy handlebar mustache and no-nonsense ways.

The Rat Patrol – 1.25 “The Wild Goose Raid”
The Rat Patrol is assigned to oversee security for an important high level meeting occurring at temporary desert headquarters in an unnamed Arab city, over the objection of the HQ commander Major Reese (William Bryant). Unbeknownst to Reese, his adjutant, Sgt. Roberts (Milner) is a German agent planning to blow up the meeting. As always, Sgt. Troy (granite-jawed Christopher George) and his crew will stop at nothing to carry out their orders, saving the day in the nick of time, despite first being sent on the titular wild goose chase. Milner seems to be having fun playing a ruthless, murderous spy. Slam-bang WWII action aplenty in this late ‘60s potboiler, benefiting greatly from extensive location filming in Almeria, Spain.
 
Last edited:

The 1960's

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Martin Sam Milner was born December 28, 1931 in Detroit, Michigan. His mother, Jerre Martin, originally from Oregon, was a dancer with the Paramount Theater circuit. His father, Sam Gordon Milner, a Polish Jewish immigrant, was a film distributor. The Milners moved to Seattle when Martin was a baby and to Los Angeles soon after. At age 15, ... See full bio » (IMDb)

S02E11 The Thin White Line (Dec.08.1961)
Stars Martin Milner George Maharis Murray Hamilton Fred J. Scollay Al Lewis Sylvia Miles Anita Gillette Doris Rich Joe Warren Gary Dubin Leonardo Cimino Ed Griffith William Hinnant Darrell Sandeen Bill Tierney

An episode in which I can readily identify with having taken my share of hallucinogens as a wild out of control 20-something year-old and thus I found it additionally frightening. A couple of would be scientists prepare a deadly potion with a hallucinatory drug to get revenge on a bully. However while partying at a Marriot Night Club Tod mistakenly drinks the glass of spiked Beer and a nightmarish Acid Trip ensues. Buz and the authorities begin a search to track him down before he seriously hurts himself or someone else. Absolutely the greatest performance in the Route 66 career of Martin Milner and a fascinating storyline which keeps the viewer transfixed throughout and displays the genuine love that Buz has for Tod.​

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The 1960's

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In case anyone is curious, these are my own created video tributes to the memory of Martin Milner. The first was done exactly 1 year ago today. The second is a revision which I completed yesterday. Both were my very first YouTube uploads. I put my heart and soul into making these!​







For those who do not own Route 66 on DVD or have simply never seen this episode, here it is.​




Finally a huge thank you to fellow board member and friend Jeff Flugel for working so hard on his beautiful posts for both George Maharis and Martin Milner!!​
 

The 1960's

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September 6th marks the anniversary of the death of TV legend Martin Milner, rock-solid leading man and character actor who always brought his A-game to the table, no matter the role, be it stalwart hero, cocksure juvenile, or scheming bad guy. Milner racked up an impressive list of film credits early in his career, in films such as Sands of Iwo Jima, Halls of Montezuma, Operation Pacific, Springfield Rifle, Mister Roberts, Pete Kelly’s Blues, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and Sweet Smell of Success, before transitioning to greater fame on television. His four-season stint as Tod Stiles on the iconic road trip drama Route 66 made him a major TV star, and he cemented that status by scoring the lead as Officer Pete Malloy for eight seasons on fondly-remembered police procedural Adam-12 for producer Jack Webb. Milner finished out his career in the ‘90s with appearances on MacGyver, Murder, She Wrote, Life Goes On and Diagnosis: Murder. Milner, by all accounts a dedicated family man, was also an avid fly-fisherman, and co-hosted a radio show on the sport called “Let Talk Hookup” from 1993 until his death in 2015 at age 83.

I’ve always liked and admired Milner, whose clean-cut, Everyman looks, forthright demeanor and calm authority makes him a reassuring presence on screen. As a tribute, I thought I’d share my thoughts on some of his work as a busy supporting actor, presented here in chronological order:

Science Fiction Theatre – 2.27 “Three Minute Mile”
Milner plays college senior and former star quarterback Britt, who quit the team in order to participate in secretive experiments with Dr. Kendall (Marshall Thompson), which have resulted in Britt gaining superhuman speed and strength. Britt’s fiancée (Gloria Marshall) and a nosy sports reporter (William Henry) start snooping around to find out just what exactly is going on. Milner’s easygoing charm and earnest personality is already clearly on display in this modest yet interesting slice of low-budget ‘50s sci-fi.

View attachment 151849 View attachment 151850 View attachment 151851 View attachment 151852

Steve Canyon – 1.12 “Operation Firebee”
Though 12th in production order, this episode was actually the last of the 34 to air in this enjoyable Air Force action drama based on the comics by Milt Caniff, headlined by Dean Fredericks as crack Air Force pilot and troubleshooter, Lt. Col. Steve Canyon. What we've got here is a mash-up of authentic jet fighter stock footage and low-key, on-the-ground dramatics, as Steve takes part in an aerial gunnery competition, wherein pilots try to shoot down guided "firebee" missiles. One such missile, dubbed “Little Looey,” has gained quite a reputation, no pilot having been able to take it out after multiple attempts, and will be retired with honors if “he” survives this final competition. Needless to say, every pilot in the competition dreams to be the one to take Little Looey down. The drone’s chief mechanic, Sgt. Ernest Bigelow (Milner), frets over his baby – especially when he witnesses firsthand Steve’s unerring aim at the skeet shooting range. Look for a young and very beautiful Patricia Blair (later Mrs. Daniel Boone) as one of two female journalists chastising Steve and his pilot pal, Major Woodrow (Richard Crane), during a double date. Also with Hank Worden (incorrectly billed in the credits as “Warden”).

Kraft Suspense Theatre
2.16 “Streetcar, Do You Read Me?”
Sticking with the Air Force pilot theme, Milner receives top billing here above Richard Long, showing how far his profile had risen after his sterling work on Route 66. True to the series’ title, this episode builds up considerable suspense, as an electrical fire during a flight from the U.S. to Spain seriously injures pilot Maj. Ben Dawson (Richard Long), forcing hesitant co-pilot, Lt. John Corby (Milner), who has up to now dodged the responsibility of becoming a lead, to dig deep, find the Right Stuff and overcome his fear of failure in order to successfully accomplish a tricky mid-air refueling and bring the plane down for a safe landing. The production appears to have gotten nearly unprecedented access to the Strategic Air Command program, with lots of impressive (and during the refueling scenes, nail-biting) B-47 bomber footage. This verisimilitude extends to the script, which is peppered with plenty of authentic military lingo. Also with Jack Ging (as the flight navigator), Leif Erickson and Nancy Malone (as Corby’s concerned young wife).

View attachment 151853
View attachment 151854 View attachment 151855 View attachment 151856

The Virginian – 3.25 “Timberland”
Bull-headed logging boss, Charlie Daniels (Arch Johnson), is dead set on clear cutting a large swath of land over the protests of several local ranchers, who worry about the resulting watershed damage to their grazing lands. Daniels has brought his pretty daughter, Katherine (Joan Freeman), to Medicine Bow, with long-held notions of her marrying his burly foreman, Paul Rogers (William Smith)...but she has second thoughts when genial rancher's son, Dave Ferguson (Milner), shows an interest in her. Deputy Ryker (Clu Gulager) is stuck in the middle of a rising conflict between the outsider timbermen and the increasingly hostile local cowboys. Things come to a head when Paul attacks Dave and is accidentally killed in the ensuing struggle.

View attachment 151859
View attachment 151840 View attachment 151841
View attachment 151846
View attachment 151880 View attachment 151842 View attachment 151843

The extra length of these Virginian episodes (this one clocks in at 77 minutes) can sometimes lead to padding, but in most cases, including this one, this allows time for deeper characterizations and gives a more epic sweep to the storytelling. James Drury shows up briefly in a few scenes, just to make sure viewers remember that its his show we’re watching, but Gulager and the very capable supporting cast keep the drama humming along. Veteran character actor Russell Thorson (who I know best for voicing tough Jack Packard in the second OTR version of I Love a Mystery), his face wrinkled like a walnut, gets a juicy part as Daniels’ longtime right-hand man, Ollie. Further familiar faces include William Bramley, Roy Engel, Norman Levitt, and Gregg Palmer.

View attachment 151863
View attachment 151847 View attachment 151848
View attachment 151844 View attachment 151845

A Man Called Shenandoah
1.32 “Requiem for the Second”
This is a call-back to a previous episode (“Muted Fifes, Muffled Drums”), in which amnesiac badass Shenandoah (Robert Horton) discovers that he was once a Lieutentant serving with the Army's 2nd Regiment at Fort Smith, one of only two survivors of a massacre by Indians there. Now, Army scout Jim Scully (John Cliff), the man instrumental in clearing Shenandoah during the previous episode’s court martial, has tracked down the other survivor, weaselly deserter Neal Henderson (Milner), who has established a new life for himself as a shopkeeper in the interim. Scully calls in Shenandoah, and together they approach Henderson to bring him in, but the man escapes, resulting in a deadly cat-and-mouse duel amid the ruins of Fort Smith. Shenandoah is desperate to talk to Henderson to gain clues about his identity, but, as is the norm for this show, is fated to never get any real answers.

An actor the caliber of Milner is rather overqualified for the part, as he gets few lines, mostly limited to skulking around the abandoned fort. This is in general a strong late period half-hour western drama, but occasionally the scripts are stripped down to a fault, as is the case here. There’s still some good action, and Scully is a cool and believably authentic character, with his bushy handlebar mustache and no-nonsense ways.

The Rat Patrol – 1.25 “The Wild Goose Raid”
The Rat Patrol is assigned to oversee security for an important high level meeting occurring at temporary desert headquarters in an unnamed Arab city, over the objection of the HQ commander Major Reese (William Bryant). Unbeknownst to Reese, his adjutant, Sgt. Roberts (Milner) is a German agent planning to blow up the meeting. As always, Sgt. Troy (granite-jawed Christopher George) and his crew will stop at nothing to carry out their orders, saving the day in the nick of time, despite first being sent on the titular wild goose chase. Milner seems to be having fun playing a ruthless, murderous spy. Slam-bang WWII action aplenty in this late ‘60s potboiler, benefiting greatly from extensive location filming in Almeria, Spain.
Over the past two evenings I binged all the Marty Milner appearances you highlighted above Jeff. With such an incredible abundance of roles from Mr. Milner you certainly picked some good ones. I particularly enjoyed The Virginian – 3.25 “Timberland”, Steve Canyon – 1.12 “Operation Firebee” and Kraft Suspense Theatre 2.16 “Streetcar, Do You Read Me?”, the latter is unfortunately unavailable on Home Video. I was lucky enough to download the print you used for your commentary from a since deleted YouTube account. It has been reposted here but the quality leaves much to be desired.

As a post script to the Martin Milner Tribute, here's an article about his love and passion for is family.

 

The 1960's

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In Memory Diana Rigg (July 30, 1938 – September 10, 2020)

Two years ago today the world lost the elegant and beautiful Diana Rigg and her wonderful Avengers persona, Emma Peel. Today we pay tribute to her memory. I will be doing so by posting images from two fan favorite episodes of The Avengers. Other member contributions will follow.

British actress Dame Enid Diana Elizabeth Rigg was born on July 20, 1938 in Doncaster, Yorkshire, England. She has had an extensive career in film and theatre, including playing the title role in "Medea", both in London and New York, for which she won the 1994 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play. Rigg made her professional stage debut in 1957 in the Caucasian ... See full bio
 

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