total tv noob here needing advice

Discussion in 'Displays' started by London Lawson, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. London Lawson

    London Lawson Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    my wife and i are wanting to buy an hdtv. we dont wanna spend over 2000(cheaper the better). i will be hooking up an xbox, dvd player, satellite reciever and a audio reciever.

    we want wide screen and at least 42 inches. and i heard these new tvs burn out or bulbs need to be replaced every few years, is this true???
     
  2. ChrisYK

    ChrisYK Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0

    If your budget is $2000, the newer technology (plasma/LCD/CLP) is a moot point. For 42 inches on your budget you'll need to go with CRT.
     
  3. London Lawson

    London Lawson Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    well i can afford more if u think it would be worth it
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1
    CRT is still the best if the size-weight of a big direct view or RPTV is ok. And it's usually cheaper to boot too!

    digital-based RPTVs and front projectors use bulbs that do burn out. CRTs use tubes that should last you a long time if you calibrate properly and don't abuse them. They age/dim with use, but they don't just blow out like light bulbs.
     
  5. Scott Reiss

    Scott Reiss Agent

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    London, I've just started to look around again at TVs myself for the first time in about 8 or 9 years. It's like starting all over. I can't even figure out yet what DLP means.

    Anyway, I noticed a 40" widescreen LCD projection HDTV Monitor at Costco over the weekend made by Panasonic. It was a PT-40LC12. It was $1900. Don't know if that helps, but I'm interested in everyone's input just like you. I also would like to stay under $2000, but even more important, I need to have something that is within a specific width-- right around 36-38 inches wide max.

    I also saw an Akai 42" HDTV monitor widescreen (not LCD) at Costco, model PT4298HD for $1000.

    Hope this helps ... Scott
     
  6. nick_rh

    nick_rh Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    The LCD screen would be a good choice for the Xbox since (1) it has a 720p native resolution and (2) you don't have to worry about burn-in. I've seen it in action and it has a very nice picture.
     
  7. ChrisYK

    ChrisYK Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think there is a general consensus that CRT will give you the best picture overall. However, the disadvantages include a smaller "sweet spot" for viewing and less brightness when compared to plasma/LCD/DLP. This could become an issue if you do a lot of daytime viewing in a room where you don't have much control over how much light enters the room. CRT TVs also require periodic maintenance (i.e. calibration, CRT cleaning, etc.) whereas the newer technology is relatively maintenance-free.

    However, for overall best picture quality (after proper picture adjustment) I don't think the newer technology has yet to equal a good old CRT RPTV. If you are going to use the TV in a dedicated home theater, I would recommend CRT without hesitation. You must decide how and when you are going to be doing your viewing and make your decision from there. As for bang for the buck, I think nothing beats CRT sets at this point.

    As kind of a side note, I purchased a Sony KP-57WS510 (57")for $1800 a couple months ago and am ecstatic over the picture quality (Panasonic XP30 DVD player via component outs). I had the chance this weekend to check out my parents' Hitachi Plasma (42HDT50) and while the overall picture was much brighter (and this is what initially people consider a "better" picture), after several minutes I noticed that skintones did not look as realistic as it did on my TV even after calibration and adjustment. The colors did not exhibit the deep saturation and consistency that I see on my TV. My biggest complaint was the black level of the plasma (and this model supposedly has some of the best black levels for a plasma). The black level was more like a dark gray. There also seemed to be movement artifact during parts of movies where there was fast panning or movement on-screen (though this could have been the DVD player... a Sony progressive scan more than the TV).

    Overall, would I be happy with the Hitachi? Yes... who wouldn't love a plasma screen? But am I happy with my Sony? A resounding yes... especially when I paid more than $3000 less for more screen.
     
  8. London Lawson

    London Lawson Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    mmmmm...well i dont watch any tv besides hbo on sundays. other than that my kids rule the tv with their dvds. this tv stuff is too much to take in..so many different options. if i buy a tv now, will it be outdated in 5 years? im aware of the different formats..480i and 480p, 720, and 1080, does it get any higher, or will it in a few years?
     
  9. Scott Reiss

    Scott Reiss Agent

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think this is a little like buying a car ... there will always be something bigger and better later, but if you need or want one now, you need to see what's out there that fits with what you want to spend. Plus, if you're like me, it's also something you do about every 5-10 years, and in between you pay little to no attention to what's happening, unless you see it drive by you on the street.

    So for me, I know there's HDTV and widescreen and plasma and LCD and lots of other stuff. But I don't yet know how to make any sense of it. There are a couple things I do know, though ... I'd like to spend 1,000 to 2,000 (USD), I would like widescreen, and it has to fit in my existing space (roughly 3 feet wide by 3 feet high.)

    If I was buying a car, I'd look at Edmunds.com or lots of other places to see what can I get for 1,000 to 2,000 that's also widescreen. That would at least give me the starter list. Then I could see which if any fit the physical space. Then I would be down to a handful that I could see which is more reliable, which has the best features for the best price, etc. etc.

    If such a thing exists for TVs I didn't hunt it down yet ... but if you can get through at least the first couple decision points, then you can start to ask specifics (like is antilock brakes worth the extra 500 or would I rather have the moonroof?)
     

Share This Page