Toshiba TheaterWide series...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ryan Wright, Oct 10, 2001.

  1. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

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    Question regarding my Toshiba TW65X81:
    What is the difference between the "Theaterwide" and "Full" screen modes? I've switched back and forth between them and see very little difference. It looks like I get a little more vertical detail and less horizontal in "Full" mode, while the opposite is true for "Theaterwide".
    Which format is the most accurate way to be watching TV? Note that I have a Toshiba progressive scanning DVD player (SD-5109) set to 16:9 mode, and watch all regular/broadcast television "full screen". (I refuse to use the "Normal" 4:3 mode. I don't mind sacrificing some detail in your basic television show.)
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    -Ryan (http://www.ryanwright.com )
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    That way, when you do criticize them, you'll be a mile away and you'll have their shoes.
     
  2. Eliab

    Eliab Agent

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    Ryan,
    TW1 – This mode will gradually stretch the image from the center out to the sides. You should use this mode for non-critical 4x3 programming (most NTSC programs), so that you won’t get uneven phosphor ware caused by the gray bars.
    TW2 – This mode will primarily crop the top and bottom of the screen. You should use this mode for non-anamorphic widescreen material. If the packaging of the DVD doesn’t say anamorphic, 16x9 enhanced, or enhanced for widescreen TVs, then it’s probably not an anamorphic disc. A good example is Titanic.
    TW3 – This mode will “zoom” in the picture in an effort to eliminate the bars in an extremely wide, non-anamorphic LBX movie (i.e., Titanic). Personally, I would advise you to stay away from this mode as it greatly distorts the picture.
    Full – This mode is intended for anamorphically enhanced widescreen material (most LBX DVDs and HDTV). This mode will give you 33% more vertical resolution with anamorphic discs than any of the other modes.
    Normal – This mode will retain 4x3 material in its original aspect ratio of 1.33:1. You should use this mode for critical 4x3 material. However, gray bars will appear on the sides of the image and can result in uneven phosphor ware. As such, you should limit viewing material in this mode to only 10-15% of the time.
    Eliab [​IMG]
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  3. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    Full is for anamorphic DVDs, sometimes marked "enhanced for 16:9 TV" on the package. The DVD player must be set for a 16:9 TV to take advantage of them.
    TheatreWide is for letterboxed shows, regardless of source (other than HDTV). There are three choices, 1, 2, and 3. The manual recommend #1, but in my opinion #2 is best, as it zooms the letterboxed image without distortion, filling the screen perfectly for a 1.85:1 movie. Also good for, say, ER.
    #1 and #3 are good, I guess, for 2 situations:
    1) You just want to fill the screen with a 4:3 show.
    2) You have letterboxed movie with subtitles below the picture, in the bar area. An example is The Longest Day. I hate these, because I can't use mode #2, so I have either a small image (Standard, 4:3 mode) or distortion. Fortunately, these are rare.
    Hope this helps!
     
  4. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

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    Thank you both for your replies. [​IMG]
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    -Ryan (http://www.ryanwright.com )
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.
    That way, when you do criticize them, you'll be a mile away and you'll have their shoes.
     

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