Torn about getting HDTV projection TV's

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Austin, Jun 7, 2002.

  1. Mark Austin

    Mark Austin Supporting Actor

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    I'm a newbie to the TV area in that I spend most of my time on the audio boards, but the time has come to buy a new set. I will also say that I'm not very educated on the latest and greatest concerning the sets now available. The Toshiba, Hitachi, and Mistu all seem to be good sets, and I'm sure I could be happy with any of them. Are there any glaring reasons to pick one over the other?

    I have been reading all I can about the different models, and makes trying to discern which would be the best for my space, and needs. The problem I am having is that it seems each manufacturer has a problem/glitch or two with their projection sets. Is it worth the hassle? I have had a 32 inch tube for the past 5 years, and after calibrating it once or twice, I haven't had any problems. I know that videophiles are after perfection in their display devices, just as I am with audio. I guess my question is this. Not being a videophile is it worth going to a projection TV or will I be happier with seems to be a more hassle free tube set? Thanks for any, and all opinions.
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Depends on whether you absolutely positively need a bigger picture. There are only a small number of direct views bigger than 36" and none bigger than 40"
    If not too many people need to gather around, you can have everyone sit closer to a 32 inch set and get back some of the visual impact that others with bigger sets are experiencing.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Mark Austin

    Mark Austin Supporting Actor

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    Allan, thanks for your response.


     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Mark,
    It all depends on what your main priority is for the set. If you want the best possible presentation for the money for widescreen dvd and especially if you intend to get into HDTV, the 16/9 rptv is the way to go. The picture from a less than perfect cable signal that looks fine on your present 32" analog set will look disappointing, however.

    That 40" Sony is very impressive, but costs more than several very good widescreen rptvs in the 43-57 inch range.

    Of the 3 brands you mention I think most would agree that the Toshiba would be the best overall choice, especially for decent handling of 4/3 480i sources. It has a better line doubler than the Mitsubishi, and better stretch modes than either the Mits or the Hitachi. The Mits sets tend to have excessive red push.

    If you could go up to a 51", doable if your viewing distance is around 9 ft or more, I'd highly recommend adding the Sony KP51HW40 to your list. The Sonys are pretty consistently good out of the box, and can produce a nice picture with just a 20 minute calibration with the AVIA disc. If you feel the need, the service menu is pretty easy to work with and you can adjust the color decoder and reduce or turn off SVM without having to pull any wires.

    If you do decide to go with a widescreen rptv, be sure to buy from a store with a good no-hassle 30 day return policy in case you decide after having it in your home that you'd prefer to go back to a direct view set.
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    If one out of one hundred TV's break within a year and fear it will be yours, you will find the extended warrenty to be a big big piece of mind. Yes, if a picture tube goes, it will cost a lot to replace. But remember that to the store, on average extended warranties are a big big profit item. Like, $200. if not $300 out of the $400. cost to you is pure profit. And uneven screen wear (phosphor burn) is not covered.

    Once you have picked out what you want to buy, spend a lot of time with the floor sample in the store. Bring your AVIA and do the calibrations you can do yourself right there as part of your getting acquainted with the set, or getting acquainted wiht rear projection.

    Do be aware that the limitations and imperfections of NTSC will be proportionately bigger, the bigger the screen is.
     
  6. Mark Austin

    Mark Austin Supporting Actor

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    Thanks both Steve, and Allan.

    The NTSC deal is something I need to check out as our family viewing is 95% digital cable, and about 5% dvd. I get very good reception now, and would be interested to see how it looks on the big screen.
     
  7. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

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    Since you're only going to be watching DVDs five percent of the time, I highly suggest going with a direct view set. 16x9 Widescreen RPTVs tend to have bars on the side when you watch 4x3 material. That can end up creating burn-in if watched all the time (just like widescreen DVDs can create burn-in of the black bars on a 4x3 set). Plus, since you watch DVDs only 5% of the time, you will not be able to get extensive use out of the extra capabilities of the set. And paying extra cash for those capabilities that may only be used 5% of the time just does not make economic sense, IMO.
     
  8. Frank Frandsen

    Frank Frandsen Stunt Coordinator

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    I would also suggest going with a direct view 4x3 set for that viewing schedule. I would also suggest that if you decided to go with the Sony 40" wait until the new model comes out, sometime early summer. It will be the kv-40xbr800 and although similar in appearance to the current 40" will have several features that will enchance cable picture quality. The most important is the feature to adjust and actually turn off the DRC(Digital Reality Creation) feature which tends to pixelate less than perfect signals. In addition the internal line doubler will be improved and should be on par with some stand alone units. The price will remain the same, msrp $3500, but careful shopping should yeild better deals.

    Frank
     
  9. Mark Austin

    Mark Austin Supporting Actor

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    Brian,

    Thanks for your input. Is the HDTV material(programming) lacking at such a point now, that it isn't worth it for that aspect either?
     
  10. David Hill

    David Hill Agent

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    Brian,

    my understanding of burn in is that that is what happens when the same signal is sent to the same place on the screen for an extended period of tme.

    But surely the black bars are there because no signal at all is being sent there? So surely there's no way burn in can happen?

    Regards,

    David
     
  11. Vlad D

    Vlad D Screenwriter

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    Real Name:
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    Burn in is uneven screen wear. When the bars are black, there is an absence of signal in that area of the screen and the rest of the screen is receiving signal. So burn in can set in.
     

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