Top DLP Projector Companies For $10,000-$20,000

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Allen Marshall, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Interested.



    Actually im still at a loss with my "what projectors can light up a 150" screen with a picture considered high definition" quest. [​IMG]

    I so do not know much when it comes to the video part of hometheater. I have a couple short questions i'd like to shoot off if anyone wouldnt mind tackling them.

    what's the highest resolution achievable as far as what we have to work with today?

    My friend told me computer monitors (or some type of computer monitor) have the highest resolution, is that true?

    My friend also told me once high definition tube tvs have better picture quality then a plasma tv, is that true?

    Are all plasma tv's high defintion?

    HD TVs arent just higher definition then normal tvs, they are capable of producing a better image as long as where that image is comming from is HD right?

    How does high definition tie in with DVDs? Do DVDs look even better on High Definition tvs or is there no connection (like how vhs looks bad on all tvs)? Is it as simple as using component wires from your tv to your dvd player or is there another box involved or what?

    are LCDs and Plasma tvs just different technologies able to get the same picture quality or is one better then the other?

    How do you rate quality of a picture when there's film involved? We seem to use a pixel count to describe resolution with tvs, how's it work with film?

    These are questions i've toyed around with in my head for so long, tried looking them up, then eventually just lost them in the back of my brain and they've gone unanswered.
     
  2. Kevin T

    Kevin T Screenwriter

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    lcd tv's and plasma tv's use two totally different technologies to display the image. as far as which has better picture quality, i can't say for certain, but lcd has the edge over plasma in my book because you will not have to worry about dreaded "burn-in". if you don't know what burn-in is, do a search.

    anybody else, feel free to join in and correct me here. i'm more an audiophile than a videophile.

    kevin t
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    I'm confused by what guidance you're searching for. Your post subject indicates "DLP for 10-20K" which I take to assume projectors?

    The highest resolution in consumer digital displays is 1080p LCOS stuff right now at about 30K.

    There is some commercial stuff at higher resolutions, and there is some stuff on the horizon, but those break 6-figures.

    CRT projection is speced for ridiculously high resolutions, but in reality the best CRT projectors are pretty limited to being able to fully resolve 1080p.

    So I'm sorta confused as to what it is you're interested in, beacuse you sound all over the map.
     
  4. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Kevin


    If this is true then what boundries limit TVs from having better quality. If a DVD can make the picture look much better on a normal tv, where does it end? or to put it in a scenerio, if i got a Super DVD player that has more scan lines then a hd tv, then put it on a normal tv, what would have better quality? to put it simply, how far could you go before it doesnt make a difference or do external devices improve quality in a different way then a higher quality tv itself.

    Hope that makes sense.

    burn in= phosphur burn? (or however you spell it)

    a.k.a. a still image staying to long screen so it starts to "burn in" and get stuck there?

    Thanks alot for what yah posted so far Kevin. There's still a couple more questions up there so anyone who read's this dont just skim past Kevin's post and suppose he tackled all of them. (if yah know the answers of course).

    Chris

    My illiteracy in the area kind of prevents me from being specific.

    how bout this.

    you put 2,000,000 pixel image (im supposing thats how pixels 1920x1080 is) on a 50" screen. To my understanding that's high definition picture quality. Is it the number of pixels that rate the quality or just overall how darn good the picture looks on the screen your looking at (from a normal human prefered distance). So like if you took 2,000,000 pixels and stretched those out onto a 20ft screen. To my understanding the picture quality would look alot worse, but would it still be considered high defintion?

    I ask this because and the film question up above cause i want to know if the highest resolution a DLP projector in this price range, can make a high definition image on a 150" screen from how far most people sit from a 150" screen. Or another way of putting it, could i compare it to being 5ft away from a 60" high definition plasma tv.

    I asked the film question cause i want to know how it works compared to this whole pixel system cause on those huge stretched out screens at theaters, the picture doesnt look great, but it's not like each individual dot is starring you in the face.

    and if in aint possible in that price range what about the next step below etc.

    Like i said i still dont know how to rate the qualities number wise.
     
  5. Jimi C

    Jimi C Screenwriter

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    What defines high def is the number of scan lines, i beleive 720p and up is considered high def.

    You wouldn't sit 5ft away from a 20ft screen. If you sit 2" from a 30" high def tv its still a high def tv, of course it wont look good.

    Do you just want to know this for curiosities sake or do you have a 20ft wall in your house that you plan on projecting a movie on?
     
  6. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Jimi. Right now im just trying to learn what i can for the sake of more knowledge, but i eventually plan on getting a projector. I dont even have a bearings or feel for the area like i do with speakers, recievers and subwoofers.

    Not entirely sure what there is to know that i should be learning about, kinda like when you decide you like surround sound but you dont know what there is to know nor really percieve the range of specific things that people take higher interests in then other areas.

    We got our 55" bigscreen in 2001. I remember reading on the bill or whatever the heck it was that it was high definition compatible. Im not exactly sure what that intales. I'm not even sure if i've ever heard this before or if i just somehow pieced it together in my head. But i just look at the back of TVs, see the component video, and go (this has high definition capabilities). I tried hooking my xbox up to the blue red green in the back of my tv with a a xbox high definitions kit. The picture came out blue. So i threw that idea away. Then i got the other kit and use S-Video to play my xbox on now.

    We have a 32" Toshiba, that my mom bought not to long ago, and it has a great picture. Nothing hooked up to it or anything, but you can tell just by looking at it the picture stands out from the rest of our tvs. What's the deal there?
     
  7. PerryD

    PerryD Supporting Actor

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    The Xbox problem is a seperate issue. If you had component inputs on your set, it should have worked. The Xbox does need to be configured correctly though, in it's setup menu, to be 480i, 480p, 1080i, 16:9, etc, but it sounds like the problem you had was more of a connection issue, with perhaps a plug not in correctly, or in the wrong color input.

    The projection issue has been stated already. There are almost no choices for 1920x1080 front projection, some 9" 400 pound tube projectors, to the new Sony Qualia, all of which cost over $25K. The current projectors do a maximum of 1366x768 or roughly half the resolution of 1920x1080, pixel-wise.

    I imagine that a 1920x1080 image can be blown up easily to a 150 inch diagonal, and would be perfect when viewing from at least 10 feet away from the screen since HD can support viewing distances of 1 to 1.5 times the width of the screen at the close end.
     
  8. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Perry, what would 1366x768 look like on a 150"?

    like...picture acceptable, high definition acceptable etc.

    What is there that you can get a 1920x1080 resolution on?

    Like i said i heard that a computer monitor with that blue cord, forgot what it was called (vga?) has the highest quality image.

    "The current projectors do a maximum of 1366x768 or roughly half the resolution of 1920x1080, pixel-wise"

    do you know any off hand? (lol perhaps starting with the least costly one)
     
  9. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Perry i just checked out my xbox now. There doesnt seem to be any option like that, just normal, letterbox or widescreen aspects. I could be wrong though, i went into settings and the only thing i found close to the subject was Video, and thats what they got in there.

    But just out of curosity, how would you know what to pick like 720 instead of 1080 or what not. im guessing the i in 480i means interlaced and the 480 p stands for..well im not sure, but is one better then the other?
     
  10. Kevin T

    Kevin T Screenwriter

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    480i = interlaced

    480p = progressive

    when your display device is in 480i, it scans the odd lines in the first pass and the even lines in the second pass. granted it does this at a very fast rate. in 480p, it scans all the lines the first time.

    kevin t
     
  11. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Thanks kevin. We've been talking about just 480 and 720 and 1080. Like, if it's 1080i, is it 1080x720 or what, how does that work.

    it recently occured to me that my dvd player has component video. So i took the composite video out, and plugged it in. Now i got the video runnin on component, is that considered high definition now? If not is there something i have to do (figit with the dvd or tv settings)

    My friend said he saw a 208" screen at best buy with a good picture from a $1,000 projector. Then i said "the picture cant be very good" and then he said "it's actually a $2,000 projector that im getting for $1,000". Now since i know this person pretty good, i know he doesnt know anything about tvs or resolution or anything. But what's the catch to this story?

    It took him half an hour to answer my question on if his dvd player and reciever are one box or two boxes. So there's no knowledge behind the motor in this area.

    Oh and whats with that thing i saw on the site, that giant wood thing that your supposed to put infront of your tv and it expands the image. Does that thing work?
     
  12. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    No. DVD is NOT High Definition. DVDs are mastered with 480 lines of resolution (vertically). High Definition requires a resolution of at least 720 lines (progressive), or 1080 interlaced. Some DVD players will upscale the 480 material to either 720p or 1080i, but what it's actually doing is interpolating the image between scanlines to produce a new image with a greater vertical resolution. This is not true HD either. The interpolation process cannot add any detail that wasn't in the original source material to begin with.

    As for your friend's assertion that he saw a 208" screen at Best Buy, I seriously doubt it. 208" is more than 17 feet. It would take a monsterously bright projector to produce a "good" image on a screen of that size - and especially if it was in the brightly lit Best Buy showroom.

    -Jason
     
  13. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Jason.

    Can anybody name some projectors in the price range specified that light up and produce a HD quality image on a 150" screen?

    I dont even know any good projector companies, the only one i know is Runco.
     
  14. Kevin T

    Kevin T Screenwriter

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    i think it would be easier if you'd let us know how much money you're willing to spend on a projector. if i had the money, i'd probably go for a sony qualia. but since i don't have the money, i had to "settle" for the sony vpl-hs3.

    kevin t
     
  15. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    $20,000 or anything much more expensive you can get used for down to that price. Just out of interest i'd like to know that if it can do 150", how large could it go before picture quality enthusiasts to be unsatisfied.
     
  16. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    1080/24, 25 and 30PsF

    what are those? [​IMG]
     
  17. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    what is DVI exactly. Im gonna take a guess and say it's another way of sending the video ( a better way or as good as using component) but if im right, why does it look like a computer cord?

    Chris do you have anything to add to the projector recommendation?
     
  18. Marc Hollins

    Marc Hollins Auditioning

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    DVI is a digital interface. That means that the video signal is sent from the source (dvd, hd receiver, etc) to the output (tv, projector, etc) digitally. All other connections/interfaces (component, s-video, composite) are analog. When you use an analog connection, your source has to convert the video from digital to analog, then the ouput converts it back to digital. A DVI cable eliminates these conversions by being an all digital solution.
     
  19. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Allen: from what I've seen, I'd say that in terms of digital projection, there's a fairly large gulf in prices from projectors centered in around $10K, such as singel chip HD2+ units, to those more at about $25-30K, which would be 3-chip DLP projectors, and the newer 1080p LCOS projectors such as the sony Qualia, and the JVC HD2K.

    I'm less familiar with the LCOS stuff at lower resolutions, etc. There is also a new LCD coming out that has really high on/off CR, which there have been noises about, i think the sony hs51? I've not seen it yet as I don't think it's quite out, but I will see it fairly soon in a few weeks or so probably.
     

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