top 5 moutain climbing movies

Discussion in 'Movies' started by chris winters, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. chris winters

    chris winters Second Unit

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    Just saw Touching the Void. Whoa. A must rent for anyone into natural disaster or mountain climbing movies.

    1)Touching the Void.

    2)?

    3)?

    4)K2.

    5)Vertical Limit.
     
  2. Ernest Rister

    Ernest Rister Producer

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    Third Man on the Mountain is *excellent*. A bit quaint in the f/x department as it was made in 1959, but it has a fantastic story, strong characters, and strong direction. I call it the "Karate Kid" of mountain climbing movies.

    See also:

    Everest (seeing it in IMAX was amazing - informative and heart-rending)
    K2 (sensational photography, underrated film IMO)
    Alive (just when you thought you were having a bad day - a movie like this will put it all into perspective)

    Haven't seen Touching the Void or Vertical Limit, and I can't quite recommend Cliffhanger, even though I enjoyed it as a straight-up brainless popcorn thriller in the Die Hard mold.

    There are probably scores of great German "mountain climbing" movies. From what I understand, it was a genre unto itself in the 30's.
     
  3. Raasean Asaad

    Raasean Asaad Supporting Actor

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    I would add:

    The Eiger Sanction

    And I believe "Into Thin Air" by Krakower was made into a film.
     
  4. Lou Sytsma

    Lou Sytsma Producer

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    Where Eagles Dare has sections with climbing but not really mountains.
     
  5. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    Here's my list:

    1. Verticle Limit

    2. Death on Everest

    3. The Mountain (Spencer Tracy and Robert Wagner)

    4. Touching the Void

    5. K2

    Not necessarily in that order.[​IMG]
     
  6. Scott_MacD

    Scott_MacD Supporting Actor

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    I can recommend Cliffhanger, since it does exactly what it says on the tin. A silly action movie, that doesn't pretend to be anything else, and does what it must rather well. Some delicious photography, and well made.

    Of course, like Where Eagles Dare, mountain climbing is purely coincidental to the thrust of the story. [​IMG]
     
  7. Brian.L

    Brian.L Supporting Actor

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    Wanted to throw my 2 cents in for Touching the Void, a great great movie. The only other movies I can even think of that I've seen that have to do with mountain climbing are Alive (decent), K2 (also decent), Cliffhanger (what everyone else said), and Vertical Limit (one of the worst movies I've ever seen IMHO).
     
  8. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    Man, only one person mentioned The Eiger Sanction?
    Really?
     
  9. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Werner Herzog also did a mountain climbing movie: Scream of Stone. It's hardly his best work, but certainly worth seeing for Herzog buffs and climbing aficionados. It's available on R2 DVD.
     
  10. RobertW

    RobertW Supporting Actor

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    Into Thin Air was made into a TV movie starring Christopher McDonald and Peter Horton. still plays pretty often on the cable "true stories" channels.

    bad, really bad. none of the drama, or emotional substance of the book.
     
  11. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Everest (IMAX) and Eiger Sanction for me too.
     
  12. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    I wish there was more mountain-climbing movies. Hopefully this genre grows in the years to come.

    I am particularly fond of K2. Great views, great story and a terrific "music" movie as well.

    Touching the Void is incredible! If you haven't seen this yet, go get this movie today! Wow! I'll never have a bad day again.
     
  13. Philip_T

    Philip_T Supporting Actor

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    My wife and I were both speachless after watching Touching the Void. Truly an amazing film. Can't recommend it enough. [​IMG]
     
  14. Ernest Rister

    Ernest Rister Producer

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    Strong review for Third Man on the Mountain

    Mountain Men, 16 May 2002
    Author: telegonus from brighton, ma

    I saw this film on the old Disney show back decades ago, and liked it very much, then sort of forgot about it. These days the Disney channel shows it periodically, and whenever it's on and I'm watching television, I can't help but stayed tuned to this one. For anyone who's ever climbed a mountain this movie is a treat.

    The story is beyond simple: a young man in 19th century Switzerland whose father was killed trying to climb the Citadel (which is what the Matterhorn is called here) wants to become a mountaineer himself, and of course climb to the top of the Citadel, which no man has done. His mother strictly forbids it, and his uncle downright nasty to him whenever the subject comes up. Persistent fellow that he is, the boy hooks up with an English mountain climber, then coaxes his uncle to take him along on a climb, makes an ass of himself, then has a go at it again. The boy doesn't really have the maturity for the task, but persists, and in time he grows up, almost in spite of himself.

    There's a larger than life quality to this movie, which was filmed on location. Director Ken Annakin, who never achieved his potential, shows himself a first-rate movie man here. The Swiss village and the looming mountains beyond convey an odd mood, as the place feels alternately dangerous, as if on the edge of the world, and beautiful, because of what one sees out the window every day. There's an intimacy between the clannish villagers, with their peculiar garb and gingerbread homes, that's caught to absolute perfection by Annakin and his crew. Everything seems real in this film; stylized as it sometimes is, it has an unmistakable ring of (admittedly Disneyfied) truth.

    As to the climbing scenes, they are wonderfully photographed, with the camera seemingly in the right place at all times. One gets just close enough to experience at least some of the danger and excitement of mountain-climbing, with the camera pulling back periodically to show a larger view, invariably breathtaking. The actors are all competent. James MacArthur's non-charisma actually helps move the picture along, as one is often more aware of who he's with than his character. He fades into the background somewhat, as young men often do, with the older, more experienced adults dominating. James Donald is brilliant as his uncle, creating a fully rounded portrait of a man who looks after his nephew, who for reasons never wholly explained, likes to belittle him. Michael Rennie is sturdy as the Englishman and Janet Munro makes a perky love interest. Herbert Lom almost steals the show as Saxo, the outsider from beyond, who also wants to climb the Citadel, and has a disagreeable disposition. He dresses differently from the others, and even wears a different sort of hat. Lom comes across as foreign, as we can see why people don't take to him in this little close-knit society.

    There are few surprises in this film, but it tells its familiar and largely predictable story with great flair and feeling for the people it's about, showing once more that one can make an outstanding, maybe even great film, out of seemingly routine, even threadbare material, if one hunkers down really hard and gives it one's best shot, as clearly everyone connected with this movie did.
     

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