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Tombstone question RE: Doc Holliday

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Adam Sanchez, Aug 15, 2001.

  1. Adam Sanchez

    Adam Sanchez Supporting Actor

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    In the movie does he say "I'm your Huckleberry" or "I'm HERE Huckleberry"? Or does he actually say both?
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    "Uh-oh."
    "Don't tell me, we're about to go over a huge waterfall?"
    "Yep."
    "Sharp rocks at the bottom?"
    "Most likely."
    "....Bring it on."
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  2. Al Fischer

    Al Fischer Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm your Huckleberry
     
  3. Sam Hatch

    Sam Hatch Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a friend who swore up and down for months that Doc was saying "I'm your hunk of butter."
    *slaps forehead*
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    "Negative. I am a meat popsicle."
     
  4. Carlos Mendoza

    Carlos Mendoza Stunt Coordinator

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    The better question is: What does it mean? Was this a popular expression in the old west? Is saying you are someone's "huckleberry" an insult to them, or are you merely identifying yourself? What would an equivalent statement be today?
    Surely there's an historian out there that can shed a little light on this.
     
  5. Aslean DeShaw

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    Never heard the phrase before outside of this movie, so if there is a historical reference, I am not aware of it. However it always seemed to me to be an allusion to Mark Twain. Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer were running buddies who would frequently get each other into mischief. By identifying himself as "Huckleberry", Doc Holiday is saying 'if you want trouble, I'll help you find it.'
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  6. Mikah Cerucco

    Mikah Cerucco Cinematographer

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    Hunk of Butter, eh? Looks like I'm not the only one who can benefit from Closed Captions. :)
    I did see a historical reference to Huckleberry at one time, but I can no longer remember what it was. It was a site that also translated the Latin going on between Doc Holliday and Johnny Ringo. As I remember, the phrase is historically correct. There are even songs that use it.
     
  7. John Thomas

    John Thomas Cinematographer

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    I took it as Aslean does, where he's basically announcing that "I'm here, want some?"
     
  8. Sam Hatch

    Sam Hatch Stunt Coordinator

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