To EQ or not to EQ? That's the question.... Answer?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by LaMarcus, Aug 6, 2002.

  1. LaMarcus

    LaMarcus Screenwriter

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    I have a Sony receiver, and it has a eq setting on it. I'm wondering whether or not to use it. And if I use it what should it be on?

    The options are:
    Treble -6 to 6+
    treble 1.0Khz to 10.0Khz

    Bass -6 to 6+
    bass 99Hz to 885Hz( goes up one more to 1.0Khz)

    I don't know how playing with those settings will effect the sound.
    Up until now I've had it set to the following:

    Tre 6+ 10.0Khz
    Bass 6+ 99Hz (sometimes 250Hz)

    Please tell me what is the best setting. I bought LOTR today and I want the highs crisp and the bass hitting hard when I watch it this weekend. Thanks.
     
  2. matthew_rm

    matthew_rm Second Unit

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    Flat-

    That seems to sound best. And if not for you, just play around with some music until it sounds good.

    What kind of speakers?
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    It’s a bit disingenuous to call this an “equalizer.” “Tone control” is more correct.
    Tone controls typically have “shelving filters,” which means everything beyond the frequency setting is boost or cut. They can be useful for:
    • Adding brightness to recordings that sound “dull”, or reducing “sizzle” on recordings with a “hot” high end.
    • Adding “warmth” to recordings that sound “thin” (i.e., lacking bass response) or reducing “boom” on recordings with heavy bass response.
    Matthew is right that you should start with the gain settings flat. (If the bass sounds weak you can turn up the sub a little.) You certainly should not be set to maximum boost at all times, like you’ve been doing. This presumes that every piece of software on the shelf is mixed with both poor bass and poor treble response. I assure you, LaMarcus, this is not the case!
    The problem is that your ears become acclimated to the “boom-sizzle” of the extreme highs and lows to where it sounds “natural” to you, even if it isn’t. So I recommend moving the gain settings back to flat and spending a week or two becoming used to the way it sounds before adjusting the controls.
    However, if this (maximum bass and treble boost) is indeed what your system needs to sound correct, you might consider getting better speakers.
    The frequency settings you’ve been using (10kHz and 99Hz) are good starting points. After adjusting gain (if at all) try moving the frequency setting up or down to see where things sound best.
    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Phil Mays

    Phil Mays Second Unit

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    I got it....set it to what you like[​IMG] Like Wayne said you may find yourself changing it for each recording.
    I love graphic equalizers as they allow me to hear and enjoy a recording the way I want to hear it, not the way someone else wants me to hear it.
    There are many purists that would disagree but it is you system and your enjoyment.[​IMG]
     
  5. LaMarcus

    LaMarcus Screenwriter

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    Thanks guys. I just wasen't sure how changing these settings would make the sound better or worst. I guess I'll really have to wait until my speakers get here to find out if adjustments are needed.

    They speakers I have now are shitty I'm sure. I'm too embarrassed to even say what they are. They've served me well though for my entry into home theater. But I'm wanting to experience some quality theater sound at home.
     
  6. Warren_Sc

    Warren_Sc Second Unit

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    I have the DA5ES and it has a 3-point, parametric EQ for the L/R and center channels, and 2-point for the rears and surrounds. The LF has one, too... I think 3-point. For each point you can change the centering frequency and the fall-off rate. On top of that it has a parametric treble and bass.

    I EQ'd my low end and took a lot of the annoying peaks out of my system from about 200Hz down. I also tweaked my center channel to try to match the tonality of the L/R. It was a pain/pleasure. I used a RS SPL meter for the bass smoothing, but used my ears to adjust the center (bringing up the upper mid-range and treble).

    I occasionally use the bass/treble for overall tweaks.

    Have fun and write your settings down...
     
  7. LaMarcus

    LaMarcus Screenwriter

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    I can never use the spl meter for my sub, it always goes off the chart.
     

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