Times change

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Darren Gross, Oct 30, 2001.

  1. Darren Gross

    Darren Gross Supporting Actor

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    Academy standard is no longer 1.33. Academy is now 1.85- that's the current standard. 1.85 is not officially considered widescreen by their standards. Widescreen is 2.40 and ratios higher than 1.85.
    Widescreen is wonderful but some of the greatest films ever were filmed 1.33. It's not the ratio- it's the film. Want epic adventure like LAWRENCE OF ARABIA? Try the 1.33 film THE FOUR FEATHERS or GUNGA DIN- amazing use of the square frame.
    I believe going back to 1.33 would be considered a step back technologically. Our TVs are now getting wider. If the majority of films were shot 1.33, they would be projected incorrectly due to current theater projector aperture plates fitted for 1.85, and audiences would feel gypped. I, for one, make a special effort to see a film I have an interest in theatrically, if I know it's 'scope.
     
  2. rutger_s

    rutger_s Supporting Actor

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    Academy Ratio was originally:
    1.37:1
    The ratio changed to:
    1.33:1
    Why? Because televisions were that ratio and so the Academy ratio was changed and films cropped slightly to fit 1.33:1
    As a result some films have improper framing. Especially older films that fall into the public domain.
    Watch some of the Looney Tunes and Merry Melodies shorts. A lot of text gags and visual gags are sometimes cut off by the new 1.33:1 framing.
    Look at the Three Stooges, some of the opening credits are slightly cropped off.
    If you change the Academy ratio again, you ruin the original AR and the original composition of shots.
    I was happy to see that PBS showed clips of the Chuck Jones Looney Tunes shorts in the OAR of 1.37:1 and very happy to see that the recent TV movie about the Three Stooges(produced by Mel Gibson) used the OAR of 1.37:1 to showcase the recreated scenes from several of their popular shorts.
    Widescreen TVs have an AR of 1.78:1. How much more are you willing to lose in a film that was originally 1.37:1?
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  3. Darren Gross

    Darren Gross Supporting Actor

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    I was delighted to see that Criterion's disc of HAXAN is perfectly framed, with the rounded corners of the original aperature visible. Windowboxing, and the like is extremely beneficial to silents and always appreciated by this reviewer.
     
  4. Mark Zimmer

    Mark Zimmer Producer

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    It's also a must for animation in my book. It's not like a film where they just shot the picture (yes, of course composition and set dressing are important), but with animation someone had to draw the whole frame. Thus, I want to see the whole frame.
    Silents also require windowboxing because the intertitles are all too often cropped off at the edges...they didn't count on overscan when they were making these. [​IMG]
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    "This movie has warped my fragile little mind."
     

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