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thought of an idea for a subwoofer enclosure (1 Viewer)

JoeGibs

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Nov 5, 2004
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how would something like this work for a subwoofer enclosure? it has the tube which is commonly used for home theater setups, and it has a hemisphere (half of a sphere) on one end. from reading about car audio, a sphere shaped enclosure is supposed to eliminate standing waves within the enclosure. anyone have any ideas how this would work out in the real world?

 

Rob Bird

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Nov 21, 2004
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For that matter, why not use a sphere? I've found hollow metal spheres online for 200 or less up to about 24". With a driver with small enough box requirements, it would be pretty amazing. You'd need a bit of calc 3 to figure out the resulting volume with the driver installed, but otherwise it's pretty straightforward if externally amplified.
 

Dave Poehlman

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Mar 8, 2000
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The great thing about subwoofers is that they really don't care much what shape of enclosure they're in. The wavelengths they're dealing out are much longer than the dimensions of the enclosure so, standing waves aren't really an issue.
 

Brian Bunge

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Sep 11, 2000
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Joe,

What Dave said!:) Enclosure shape means nothing in any normal sized sub.

Rob,

I don't see why you'd need calculus to figure it out. Simple subtraction should suffice.
 

JoeGibs

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Nov 5, 2004
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116
thanks for the replies guys, i guess i'll just stick to a plain ol' square enclosure. party poopers.

i dont know if the same applies for home theater subs, i would assume it does, but from my car audio experience, a 15" driver usually displaces about .12-.15 cf. figuring out the volume of a sphere isnt that though either.
 

Dave Poehlman

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Mar 8, 2000
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3,813
To figure driver displacement, I usually just calculate the magnet structure since it takes up most of the space and it's easy to figure out.

Just measure the radius and height and plug it into 3.14 * r^2 * h = volume.

The frame and what protrudes into the enclosure of the cone shouldn't account for much more (round up your calculation). Besides, you've cut a hole in the enclosure for the driver, so you've added a few cubic inches to the volume already which I like to think will cancel that stuff out anyway.

As long as you get it in the ballpark you're fine, IMO.... especially when you're talking more in terms of cubic feet than cubic inches for a sub enclosure.
 

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