This may be a dumb question recievers, but here I go anyway

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gary Joe, Nov 21, 2002.

  1. Gary Joe

    Gary Joe Stunt Coordinator

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    I've been researching the DIY forum for some speakers to build. It seems one of the most importan criteria for good speaks is a "flat response" from x to y hz. My question is how does one know if the reciever or amp is sending the speakers a flat sinal that isn't 10db high at 40 hz, rolls way off past 8000hz and looks like a roller coaster in between?

    I wish you could edit the title so when you screw it up you won't look like an idiot until your post cycles through. Oh well, just call me Duh Collins.
     
  2. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Typically, receivers WILL have some sort of bandwidth spec. Any amp that can't be reasonably flat wouldn't make it to market these days, anyway.
     
  3. Gary Joe

    Gary Joe Stunt Coordinator

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    is there a way to test a reciver to see if how it performs?
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    in the final "equation"....wouldn't the speakers really have the most effect on the frequency response? just take a look at any speaker graph and you'll see just how much variation takes place. it's anything but flat..
     
  5. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Or the room...big effect
     
  6. Blake R

    Blake R Stunt Coordinator

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    Modern solid state amplifiers have response so flat compared to even the best speakers that it may not be worth the angst. If you examine response curves for speakers versus any decent quality amps you'll see why high end speakers cost so much more than amps pound for pound. It is much more difficult to design a maximally flat speaker. Modern amps can yield marginal linearity improvement that is far beyond the human ear's ability to detect. Manufacturing a large electromechanical device like a speaker, that has a linear frequency characteristic over ten octaves ain't easy. MOSFETS and JFETS(transistors) however, can consistently be made by the thousands to extremely high tolerances.

    I think I would do my best to design a flat speaker and not worry to much about the amp if it is a quality make.
     
  7. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    Cees Alons
    Gary,

    There are ways to measure the frequency response of an amplifier/receiver. You would need some high-brow equipment, e.g. an oscillograph. But as other posters here said: don't worry.

    Now about the speakers frequency curve: it's true that it's far from ideal, as compared to the amp's curve, but it's not true that the amp wouldn't matter! As a result of the steering of the amp by a well designed amplifier, the amp can force the speaker to follow its signal more closely than you would imagine. In other words: it's the speaker's curve that may be a little bit less important!
    A good power amp is essential.

    Cees
     

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