This just in: There *is* a supermassive black hole in the galactic core.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jack Briggs, Oct 17, 2002.

  1. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    How can anyone not be excited and thrilled by this news? And, though the CNN article doesn't mention it, this finding revolutionizes our thinking about how galaxies are formed. It just may be that black holes are crucial to the creation of galaxies. And, at the risk of being morbid, they may be key to the destruction of galaxies.
    When I was growing up, it was believed that two galaxies colliding would be largely a non-event, that the spaces between the stars are so great that the two galaxies would emerge unscathed. Not so. If supermassive black holes are common to galactic centers, colliding galaxies would rank among the most cataclysmic disasters imaginable.
    Guess what? Our galaxy is on a collision course with M-31 (aka, the Andromeda Galaxy). Of course, this won't occur anytime soon, so you can still plan on having a World Series party this Saturday.
    http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/space/1...ole/index.html
     
  2. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    Aren't we also on a collision course with the much closer Magellanic Clouds? True, as galaxies go, the Magellanic Clouds are spotty at best, but it's still an event I'd buy a ticket to see.
     
  3. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

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    So do all galaxies inevitably get swallowed by their central black holes? Or some and not others? If things are balanced "just so", would the outer galactic stars simply orbit the center?
     
  4. Steve Christou

    Steve Christou Long Member

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    Interesting news Jack, but won't this supermassive black hole suck up everything in our galaxy long before we collide with the Andromeda Galaxy?
    Btw thats the most epicly mindboggling question I've ever asked in my life![​IMG]
    Black holes are supposed to be massive vacuums sucking up stars and planets, or is that science fiction?
    And whats on the other side of a black hole?
    A 'white hole' is what I've read somewhere, no I haven't been reading Greg Bear or Stephen Baxter recently, oh ok I have....
    And what about wormholes are they rips in the fabric of space and time?
    And please dumb it down a little, down more, no no up a bit, thats it![​IMG]
     
  5. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    To me, it only seems logical that there would be one there. The highest concentration of matter is there- why wouldn't there be one?

    It seems to me that early stars (shortly after the Big Bang) that have supernova'd (a word?) and collapsed would form the basis for the creation of galaxies, drawing material towards it. Or perhaps, the black hole formed later, after an area of high density stars, around which the galaxy formed, collapsed in on itself. It seems the logical conclusion to ever-increasing gravitational forces.

    Behind all the apparent complexities with which the world, universe, etc. operates, is a simplicity that is almost too much to comprehend (if that makes any sense). That's my experience, anyway.

    Todd
     
  6. CharlesD

    CharlesD Screenwriter

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  7. Aaron Copeland

    Aaron Copeland Second Unit

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    Wait, I thought this was "common" knowledge already? I watched a show on TV (Discovery maybe?) that talked about massive black holes being at the center of every galaxy, including our own, quite a few months ago. It even showed pictures of the black hole at the center our galaxy "feeding". It was a very interesting program. I could watch stuff like that all day.

    Aaron
     
  8. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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  9. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Scientists have given that super-massive black hole a name -"DVD"
    Makes sense. Hell, it's already sucked all the money out of my wallet. [​IMG]
    Regards,
    Joe
     
  10. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    In all seriousness, while black holes have huge gravity fields, they don't "suck matter into them." Our own sun has a pretty decent gravity field, but all the planets haven't been pulled into it. It is only when an object gets too close to a body like a sun or a black hole, and is travelling too slowly, that it will "fall".

    If I understand the basic theory correctly, matter should presumably orbit a blackhole much as it orbits any ordinary star. Provided the orbits are relatively stable, and orbiting objects don't collide with each other, you could just have lots of solar systems calmly circling the black hole. Of course, the star density towards the center of the galaxy is presumably much higher, so there is a good chance there are collisions, and a fair amount of mass being dumped into the black hole at a steady clip.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  11. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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  12. andrew markworthy

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    An area of nothingness where time and all normal values are distored? Sounds like my home town. [​IMG]
     
  13. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    As Jack said, the discovery that there’s a super massive black hole in the center of every galaxy above a certain size is going to revolutionize our thinking about how galaxies form.
     
  14. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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  15. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    If I understand the basic theory correctly, matter should presumably orbit a blackhole much as it orbits any ordinary star. Provided the orbits are relatively stable, and orbiting objects don't collide with each other, you could just have lots of solar systems calmly circling the black hole.

    The trick of course is that you state that the orbits must be stable. Black holes have a "Last Stable Orbit". Black holes warp space in such a way that even a collision free orbit that would be perfectly stable in a pure newtonian system is unstable around a black hole inside a certain radius (usually within 3 Schwarzchild Radii).

    This radius can vary depending upon the spin of a black hole (and is one way scientists can measure what a black hole's spin is).

    But of course long before you get that close you will probably have broken apart due to Roche Limit constraints. Once this happens, you greatly increase the chance of collisions, which also increases your chances of bumping and falling further into the black hole.

    And finally one has to remember that unlike our sun, which is constantly losing mass, a black hole is more than likely gaining mass due to objects entering it. Thus anything orbiting a black hole will slowly orbit closer and closer, although picking up angular velocity. Once it enters the Last Stable Orbit its fate is practically sealed.
     
  16. Darren Mortensen

    Darren Mortensen Stunt Coordinator

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    I can only hope that this Black Hole will come into alignment with Nebraska and suck my ex-wife into oblivion![​IMG]
     
  17. Shawn Shultzaberger

    Shawn Shultzaberger Supporting Actor

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  18. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

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    Does it strike anyone that in some manner the accumulation of matter into black holes, especially galactic core black holes goes rather AGAINST entropy?
    To me having the scatter of galactic matter coming together in a few key points (black holes) would seem to be very much order coming from chaos. Or rather a bit of structure developing.
    Is there any good published math/physics on this idea (readable I mean)? I'd love to hear why this idea is incorrect (which I assume it is, otherwise we just might have heard about it. [​IMG])
     
  19. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Hmmm, and eventually, all matter in the univese will converge into one big black hole, so powerful that nothing can escape it and with a mass so large that it cannot exist without contracting into a single dot and exploding? I wonder how many times this may have happened in the past already?
     
  20. Leif Wall

    Leif Wall Second Unit

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    I was just on space.com reading about it...


    You can't see a black hole?
     

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