They’re Still Not Making Laser Discs Are They?

maxfabien

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I have a laserdisc of "The Big Ones You Can Look At", 26 Aerosmith music videos. The dvd sells for over $700.
 

Traveling Matt

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As recently as 2016, there was a commercially-available laser turntable that played LPs without making physical contact. I believe that you had to purchase it directly from the manufacturer, and that it was quite expensive.

Above my pay grade, anyway.

:P

Much preferable to the other hard copy music format that doesn't touch the disc. And is more, shall we say, compact. :rolleyes:
 

JoshZ

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One thing that kinda killed laserdiscs was the price of the player at a average price for a nice Pioneer $400 and up and the average price of a laserdisc. Joining the Columbia House Club did help buying them and also stores like Blockbuster & Camelot. Towards the end Ebay & Big Emma's had some very nice prices and that is were i bought half of my discs.
Big Emma's... Haven't heard that name in forever. Ken Crane's was another popular mail-order source for Laserdiscs. My favorite local retailers were Laser Craze in Boston and Sound & Vision in Waltham. I spent many hours perusing the stock at those places.
 

Brian H

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I'm trying to dig thru lots of old gear and media in order to move it out as we need the space. One thing that I have been ignoring is a big rack of laserdiscs that I really need to get rid of. I haven't counted thru them but would guess there are between 350-500+ LD's that include everything from B-rated movies to some of my favorite box sets like The Star Wars Trilogy, Alien(s), The Wizard of Oz, etc (and I remember correctly, there 'may' be a few Criterion).

Is there a market of used LD's and if so, where? Otherwise, these will likely end up in the landfill...
 

Jesse Skeen

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I have well over 3000 laserdiscs now, in large part thanks to those who gave me their collections. I'd never let a single one go into a landfill.

The very last laserdisc made in the US was for the Dragon's Lair arcade machines, with a few levels that were cut from the official disc released in 1983. I also have a couple Sears in-store laserdiscs with movie trailers and music videos from 2001.
 

Thomas Newton

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Much preferable to the other hard copy music format that doesn't touch the disc. And is more, shall we say, compact. :rolleyes:
Despite what some audiophiles say, CDs have better sound quality than LPs. But I'm guessing that a few people think that LPs sound better, or have huge numbers of LPs, already. Thus the very niche market for laser turntables.
 

darkrock17

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I have well over 3000 laserdiscs now, in large part thanks to those who gave me their collections. I'd never let a single one go into a landfill.

The very last laserdisc made in the US was for the Dragon's Lair arcade machines, with a few levels that were cut from the official disc released in 1983. I also have a couple Sears in-store laserdiscs with movie trailers and music videos from 2001.
WOW Laserdisc made it that long, that's very impressive.
 

Jeffrey D

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Despite what some audiophiles say, CDs have better sound quality than LPs. But I'm guessing that a few people think that LPs sound better, or have huge numbers of LPs, already. Thus the very niche market for laser turntables.
Supposedly LPs are now outselling their CD counterparts today- something that boggles my mind. I’d much rather have a CD.
 

Jeffrey D

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I'm trying to dig thru lots of old gear and media in order to move it out as we need the space. One thing that I have been ignoring is a big rack of laserdiscs that I really need to get rid of. I haven't counted thru them but would guess there are between 350-500+ LD's that include everything from B-rated movies to some of my favorite box sets like The Star Wars Trilogy, Alien(s), The Wizard of Oz, etc (and I remember correctly, there 'may' be a few Criterion).

Is there a market of used LD's and if so, where? Otherwise, these will likely end up in the landfill...
You might want to try selling the lot at an auction house, if you want to get rid of all of them at the same time. Just spitballing.
 

OLDTIMER

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Laser discs of course used analogue technology, hence the large size disc and the short playing time. I copied many of my LDs to DVD before I got rid of my player, so I can still see what the quality was like: OK on a small screen TV which was the norm then, but on today's large screens the picture looks awful! Low res and full of chroma noise and dropouts!
But at the time it was great! Better than VHS. Those were the days!
 

Worth

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Laserdisc was impressive for its time, but having to flip the disc (or wait for the laser to switch over) every hour - or even worse, every half-hour - was hardly an ideal way to experience a film. And I don't know if this was the case with the high-end players, but the mid-range ones I could afford had horrible chroma noise, worse than that found on pre-recorded VHS and beta tapes.
 
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I have a Pioneer CLD- M301 5 disc player that plays CD,CDV/LD. I always get a kick
out of watching CAV discs in slow motion. In Quigley Down Under you can see the bullet
in frame to frame format. It is a 2 disc DVD with only one side in CAV. I have enjoyed having
them but wife pushing to sell them and downsize. NO WAY!! LOL
 
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Thomas Newton

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Supposedly LPs are now outselling their CD counterparts today- something that boggles my mind. I’d much rather have a CD.
Even as Target has reduced their CD selection to almost NIL, they have added LPs. The LPs often cost twice as much, or more, than their CD counterparts. I suspect that this might be behind brick and mortar stores' motivation to put LPs on the shelves.
 

Thomas Newton

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Supposedly LPs are now outselling their CD counterparts today- something that boggles my mind. I’d much rather have a CD.
Another possibility is that people prefer digital music as a whole (CDs, downloads) to LPs … but that intermediate formats (CDs, compressed downloads, downloads without full-LP-size electronic art) are slowly on their way out.
 

JoshZ

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My favorite local retailers were Laser Craze in Boston and Sound & Vision in Waltham. I spent many hours perusing the stock at those places.
As I think of it, that second store was called Sight & Sound.

Is there a market of used LD's and if so, where? Otherwise, these will likely end up in the landfill...
eBay and the marketplace on LDDb.com are probably your best bets to sell old LDs. The problem is that the discs are so large, heavy, and fragile that you really need to pack them well for shipping, ideally in a well-padded mailer box designed for LP records. And the shipping will probably be expensive.

The other problem is that most Laserdiscs aren't worth enough to justify the effort of selling them. The amount of content released on Laserdisc that wan't reissued later on DVD or Blu-ray (not to mention streaming) gets smaller by the day. Box sets, imports, and Criterions may still hold some value, but most movie-only releases of common titles will be hard to unload.

A few years back, I cut my collection in half by posting them on Craig's List for free to the first local person who could come pick them up so I didn't have to ship them. The deal was they had to take the whole lot, no picking-and-choosing titles. I got rid of a bunch of clutter without feeling as bad as I would have if I'd thrown them in the trash.

And I don't know if this was the case with the high-end players, but the mid-range ones I could afford had horrible chroma noise, worse than that found on pre-recorded VHS and beta tapes.
Laserdisc playback quality was highly dependent on the player used. The high-end players had much better image than entry-level or mid-range players. That said, most of that "better" quality was the result of using DNR to suppress noise, which is frowned upon today. Out standards for what constitutes good picture quality have changed significantly since the LD days.

I imported a very expensive top-of-the-line Pioneer HLD-X9 from Japan, which was renowned for its 3D comb filter that could virtually eliminate dot crawl and chroma noise. It looked great on an NTSC CRT television, but unfortunately it interacts horribly with modern digital displays and results in the picture breaking up into pixelated "checkerboard" artifacts during motion. I actually have to turn that feature off now.
 

Angelo Colombus

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I have to thank Roger Ebert & Gene Siskel on me getting into laserdisc. I just started to buy vhs tapes when i saw one of their shows and they talked about laserdiscs and letterboxing. They were showing scenes from the Criterion release of Blade Runner and seeing that i got hooked and bought my first player and started to rent discs from Blockbuster.
 
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jcroy

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I have to thank Roger Ebert & Gene Siskel on me getting into laserdisc. I just started to buy vhs tapes when i saw one of their shows and they talked about laserdiscs and letterboxing. They were showing scenes from the Criterion release of Blade Runner and seeing that i got hooked and bought my first player and started to rent discs from Blockbuster.
Back in the day, that Criterion Blade Runner laserdisc was one of the few worthwhile laserdiscs purchases. It was orders of magnitude better than the then-current VHS version. (The common vhs version in those days looked a lot darker and was harder to see what was going on. Even with the brightness turned to max).
 
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Malcolm R

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Even as Target has reduced their CD selection to almost NIL, they have added LPs. The LPs often cost twice as much, or more, than their CD counterparts. I suspect that this might be behind brick and mortar stores' motivation to put LPs on the shelves.
My local Walmart has done the same thing. Just a handful of new release CD's, but they removed all the catalog titles in the entertainment aisle and replaced part of it with vinyl records.

Our Tiny Target has never carried music of any kind since they opened a couple years ago.
 

Angelo Colombus

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Back in the day, that Criterion Blade Runner laserdisc was one of the few worthwhile laserdiscs purchases. It was orders of magnitude better than the then-current VHS version. (The common vhs version in those days looked a lot darker and was harder to see what was going on. Even with the brightness turned to max).
That Siskel & Ebert episode also had scenes from the Criterion release of 2001: A Space Odyssey which i still have on my shelf.
 

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