Their, There, and They're

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Moe Maishlish, Jul 7, 2003.

  1. Moe Maishlish

    Moe Maishlish Supporting Actor

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    I'm frustrated!

    One of my biggest pet-peeves is reading something in which the three words "their", "there", and "they're" are mis-used or substituted for one another.

    I just finished reading a post in which "their" was used for every instance of "their", "there", and "they're", and I had to stop reading for a while. When I read a sentence like "Their is a mistake in this sentence.", I want to stop and correct it. [​IMG] I know it sounds like I'm being too picky, but it's just something that gets to me.

    So here's a quick crash course on when & how to use these three wonderful dramatic and oh-so-misused words:

    They're - conjunction of "they" and "are". i.e. "They're going to have to learn to spell properly so that Moe's head doesn't explode".

    Their - posessive form of "they". i.e. "Their misuse of these three words is going to make Moe's head explode".

    There - NO relation to "their" or "they're", and used to refer to a subject. i.e. "There is Moe, his head has just exploded".

    [​IMG]

    Moe.

    Edit: corrected my own silly spelling mistake, as many have ironically pointed out to me. [​IMG]
     
  2. Hunter P

    Hunter P Screenwriter

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    Um, don't forget "thar." (e.g. There is gold in them thar hills!)

    My peeve is the mis-use of "your" to represent "you're."
     
  3. Eric_E

    Eric_E Supporting Actor

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  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    And let's not forget the near constant misuse of "it's" (short for "it is") for the possessive "its". To illustrate the distinction:

     
  5. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    Everyone deserves a decent education.

    Thanks, Moe [​IMG]
     
  6. Jay Heyl

    Jay Heyl Stunt Coordinator

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    I get annoyed at the there/their/they're thing also, though my pet peeve is misuse of the phrase "begs the question." Unfortunately, it seems essentially no one currently speaking the English language knows the proper application of this phrase. I can't count the number of times I've seen or heard people who should know better, people who make their living in communication, use "begs the question" when they really meant "raises the question".

    Begging the quesion is what one does in an argument when one assumes as true what one claims to be proving. For instance, "We know God exists because we can see the perfect order of His Creation, an order which demonstrates supernatural intelligence in its design." The conclusion of this argument is that God exists. The premise assumes a Creator and Designer of the universe exists. The person making this argument should not be granted the assumption that the universe exhibits intelligent design but should be made to provide support for the claim. This is the only proper use of "begs the question". Any time you hears "begs the question" followed by a question, it's almost certainly an improper usage. If you aren't criticizing the logic of an argument, "begs the question" is the wrong phrase.
     
  7. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    I just don't think the 'its' mistakes are in the same group as 'there'. I mean, there, their, and they're follow the typical rules of English. Its doesn't. When the possessive form of a word uses an s, it always has an apostrophe except for the case of its. It's ridiculous. I can't remember that one for the life of me. I had four years of English in high school, and I took four English courses in college, my spelling, grammer, etc., is usually pretty good. But damned if I can ever remember to use its or it's.

    With there, their, and they're, its pretty simple. If you aren't saying "they are", you can't use they're. So then you got two remaining, well there and here are used for similar functions. i.e., there something is, here something is. Thus leaving their, which I can't see where that word evolved properly, but its all that's left. Naturally you should say they's. But we don't do that. And of course someone is going to insist that they's means they is, and its not possessive. So the possessive is obviously theys.

    What about plural forms of it? Is that its? I would assume so. If a bunch of unkown objects are coming at you, can you say "Look, its are coming right at us!"? I think so.

    English is a silly language at times. But there, they're, and their, as well as your and you're do actually make sense and their usage can easily be figured out, IMHO.
     
  8. Tim Abbott

    Tim Abbott Second Unit

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    Finally, people that I can relate to!!!! I am hardly a genius, but how can someone get through high school and not know how to use pronouns properly??? I want to know what happened to our education system. I thought I was the only one that was bothered by this, but apparently not.

    I am certainly glad to know that your out their, to.
     
  9. Ron Etaylor

    Ron Etaylor Second Unit

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    I am proud to associate with the group of cunning linguists who post here[​IMG]
     
  10. Peter Kline

    Peter Kline Cinematographer

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    Speaking of art galleries. Yesterday I went there to the see their paintings which they're very proud of.
     
  11. Jeffrey Noel

    Jeffrey Noel Screenwriter

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    How about using 'loose' instead of 'lose'?

    For example, "I hate it when I loose my keys."

    Talk about driving me nuts!
     
  12. Chris Lockwood

    Chris Lockwood Producer

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    Moe, your right. You're point is a good one. People should bee more careful with there English, its just not write for growed adults two be so careless. [​IMG]
     
  13. Chris Lockwood

    Chris Lockwood Producer

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    > I just don't think the 'its' mistakes are in the same group as 'there'. I mean, there, their, and they're follow the typical rules of English. Its doesn't.

    The word its follows the rule that possessive pronouns like his, her, your, my, and their don't have apostrophes, either.
     
  14. Paul McElligott

    Paul McElligott Cinematographer

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    If I many interject my own pet peeve:

    The past tense of "to cast" is not "casted."

    WRONG:
    Patrick Stewart was well casted in the role of Captain Picard.

    RIGHT:
    Patrick Stewart was well cast in the role of Captain Picard.
     
  15. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  16. Steeve Bergeron

    Steeve Bergeron Cinematographer

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    I'm with you there! English isn't even my first language and it bothers me when I see those silly mistakes.

     
  17. DaveGTP

    DaveGTP Cinematographer

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    One of my pet peeves as well. Drives me crazy. IT'S [​IMG] pretty simple.
     
  18. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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  19. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    Well ok, that rule makes sense. Perhaps I can remember it now. But shouldn't the spelling be totally screwed up? She to her, he to his, and so on. How about ets? Are there any other words that become plural with just an s added on them?

    The lose/loose one really bothers me. The two o's clearly indicates what to do. And before anyone says anything about my use of an apostrophe just now, I have seen somewhere that it is acceptable at times to use apostrophes to indicate plural if you're dealing with acronyms and the like.
     
  20. Cary_H

    Cary_H Second Unit

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    A few of my peeves are;

    The use of the word careered, as in, "the out of control SUV careered down the street smashing into several parked cars along the way". Careened I can live with. Where did careered come from?

    Meridian instead of the word Median. Orientated? It's oriented. As in, I had to get myself oriented. I always hear, "I had to orientate myself."

    "I could care less". Huh? That doesn't make any sense at all where it is used. It's "I COULDN'T care less?"

    Places where we abuse "er", as in, say, "I was looser", rather than, "I was more loose". Sometimes it's used incorrectly the other way around, as in, "I was more fast", or even "more faster" rather than, "I was faster". There are a million of 'em.

    I could go on forever, with ones like where, where are, and wear, and we're, we are, and were.

    As a Canadian, one that kills me is the misuse of "eh" by non-Canadians. I know it's used almost entirely in jest....but it has it's correct place, and it's real obvious to us when misplaced. The most recent faux pas that comes to mind was in the headline for a recent column in the Washington Post. We're used to it so we pay it no mind, but it has it's correct place.
     

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