The Vanishing and Blood Simple - any reviews ?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Deepak Shenoy, Sep 8, 2001.

  1. Deepak Shenoy

    Deepak Shenoy Supporting Actor

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    I haven't seen any online reviews for these two DVDs coming out next week (OK, DVD Savant has a Blood Simple review, but all he has to say about the picture quality is that it "is a distinct improvement on the grainy theatrical prints seen back in 1984").
    If you have managed to get your hands on these discs, please post your views on the picture and sound quality (I am especially anxious to hear about The Vanishing which will be coming out in its OAR for the first time).
     
  2. Wes Ray

    Wes Ray Supporting Actor

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    I've not heard much about Blood Simple, but I will probably pick up The Vanishing. I've heard a lot of great things the movie.
     
  3. Deepak Shenoy

    Deepak Shenoy Supporting Actor

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    Wes,
    I am a huge fan of both movies and I am delighted that both are coming out on DVD on the same day (along with another favorite of mine - the 1962 version of Cape Fear). They are so good that the inferior formats I had these movies in (Blood Simple in grainy VHS, and The Vanishing in Fox Lorber's crappy pan and scan DVD), did not keep me from watching them on a regular basis. You will love Blood Simple if you are a fan of the Coen Brothers (it is their first film) or a fan of films with a modern spin on the film-noir genre.
    Hope to see some reviews for these titles soon ...
     
  4. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Guess I know what I'll be doing Tuesday....it's a good thing I'm working overtime!
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    He thought on homeland, the big timber, the air thin and chill all the year long. Tulip poplars so big through the trunk they put you in mind of locomotives set on end. He thought of getting home and building him a cabin on Cold Mountain so high that not a soul but the nighthawks passing across the clouds in autumn could hear his sad cry. Of living a life so quiet he would not need ears. And if Ada would go with him, there might be the hope, so far off in the distance he did not even really see it, that in time his despair might be honed off to a point so fine and thin that it would be nearly the same as vanishing.
    -- Charles Frazier, Cold Mountain
     

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