The TV and Movie industry are destroying themselves...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DeathStar1, Aug 13, 2002.

  1. DeathStar1

    DeathStar1 Producer

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    Every now and then, a friend of mine who keeps up on the buisness more than I do, points out things that are wrong with the TV industry. He just told me of a new deal that was inked between TNN and Taco Bell. How Taco Bell products are gong to be placed in live action and animated shows... how the fears that Ren could be the new spokesdog for the company might be realized [​IMG].
    True, this has been going on since TV was invented.. But what other ways are advertisers going to annoy us by bombarding us with advertisements?
    I hardly ever go to the movies anymore. Stadium seating has improved the movie going experience drastically, but with 2-3 minutes of commercials, and 2-3 minutes of movie previews(The latter no one minds), what's next? Company banner adds on theater walls?
    TV's even worse. Less than 4 years ago, CBS was probably the network with the shortest commercial break. No more than a minute .5 . I stayed tuned in, because if you missed the commercials, you missed the begining of the show. Now, commercials are a good 3 minutes, depending on the length of the program. It also means, in syndication, 3 minutes of good jokes/drama/show are cut out.
    When are executives, who hate inventions like Tivo because of add loss, going to realize their destroying themselves? The moment the add becomes more important than the show, people will tune out of both.
    There's got to be some way the TV and movie industry can save itself and get back to some semblance of normalcy.
    Hmm... I wonder how long a commercial break in the 50's was compared to today...
     
  2. Ben Menix

    Ben Menix Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, technically speaking, almost every program on t.v. AND radio in the early days was an ad. Ever heard of the Lucky Strike Program? Most people remember it as "The Jack Benny Show". Lucky Strike sponsored the program, which essentially meant that they paid for it. The show opened with a cigarette plug, the opening monologue ended with a cigarette plug, the pan-out at the end of a skit was a cigarette plug, there was a dedicated cigarette commercial between skits, and the whole process was repeated for the second skit, and any variety acts. Any cigarettes used in the skits had to be prominently shown to be Lucky Strikes. There was usually at least one Lucky Strike reference in each skit. The show ended with numerous references to how great the sponsor (Lucky Strike) was. How fair, generous, understanding, gag, gag, gag.
    Even then, it wasn't nearly as obnoxious as modern advertisements. Plus, since there was only one or two sponsors for any given show, commercial breaks were in fact shorter.
    Ben Menix
    MainTease@MidniteTease.com
     
  3. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Japan's system is great

    2 commercials (15sec) beforea program, opening credits after which the "Grand Sponsor"s are plugged, 1min of commercials, 15min of show, 1.5min more, 10min of show, end credits repeat
     
  4. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

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    If we really want commericals eliminated from TV, we have to pay for what we watch. This way, the networks will receive their income from subscribers instead of corporate sponsors.
     
  5. DeathStar1

    DeathStar1 Producer

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    I mused in someone elses statement earlier, TV Show Seasons on DVD first, TV later. This way networks don't need to pay for the TV show. IT'll already be payed for by way of DVD sales...or so the theory goes..
     
  6. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Who do you think pays for commercials? They don't pay themselves. We already ARE paying for what we watch!

    /Mike
     
  7. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    And let's not forget that most people pay for cable channels and they STILL have commercials

    TV seasons on DVD first.... uhhh no

    Unless someone is going to pay like $250-300 a season and they expect it to sell 500,000 copies

    The average episode of a one hour drama costs between 1 and 3 million dollars depending on salaries. So let's say 2 for round figures, $44 million for a TV season (still cheap compared to movies) assumes 150,000 copies at $300 a pop (like that price is happening anywhere except Japan, where TV seasons are usually about that price). NOT to mention the fact that first-run TV revenue would be totally lost because people can just buy the set. The fact that many anime shows are already out in full on DVD has made many of them a hard sell for example.

    The future as I see it: Shown on TV, right to DVD for that fast revenue makeup. The diehard fans have it, take it OOP in a year when Season 2 comes out and don't bring it back out again till after it's in syndication. Therefore the syndicator has their window, and the diehards won't be sitting there going "when oh when for DVD?"
     
  8. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    The commercialization of everything doesn't bother a lot of people, and some just tune it out. Many people in an ADD society don't even find them (commerials every 6 1/2 minutes or so of programming) incompatible with the story or plot of the program they watch.

    For those of us who are nauseated by the great sellebration, we can buy a book, or a DVD, and enjoy it in peace.

    If we have to watch a tv program, at least use the vcr and speed thru the commercials...
     
  9. Charles J P

    Charles J P Cinematographer

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    Location:
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  10. Stacey

    Stacey Stunt Coordinator

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    Last time I looked, even our DVD's are being saddled with ads, thankfully they can be skipped but how long before they will be "Locked Out" like the Copy Warnings.
     
  11. Ben Menix

    Ben Menix Stunt Coordinator

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    There is no way you can or could get rid of advertisements on tv. Manufacturers, distributors, and retailers are chomping at the bit for every 10 seconds of popular ad space they can get. It's all about exposure. Bill Gates couldn't pay enough money to a network to get them to stop broadcasting advertisement to HIS house, let alone anyone else's. For every 10,000 households that see an ad for brand G trashbags this week, that's anywhere from 1 to 10 more boxes of brand G trashbags that get sold directly, and another 2 that get sold indirectly. Considering how many times that happens in a month, you can understand why no bribe would work. You would have to buy the company out, then drive them into the ground.
    Of course, then you wouldn't have Brand G trash bags anymore, and I really like the durable straps, at least the yellow ones, the red ones are kind of week. So please don't drive the company into the ground. [​IMG]
    Ben Menix
    MainTease@MidniteTease.com
     

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