owen35

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What is Spielberg's connection to this release?
From the press release: "Filmmaker Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick's former personal assistant Leon Vitali worked closely with the team at Warner Bros. during the mastering process."
 
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Vincent_P

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I wonder if Spielberg was actually "closely involved" or if it's now Warner Brother's MO to attach a famous current filmmaker's name to these projects (i.e., Nolan being "attached" to 2001).

Vincent
 
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TonyD

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I’ve never been a fan of this movie it’s always seemed silly and not scary to me but I am curious to see what this disc will look like.
 

Josh Steinberg

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Spielberg has played this role before, perhaps most famously with convincing Paramount to restore The Godfather. While I don’t blame the studio for using a prestigious name to help market the product, which ultimately helps protect the investment, Spielberg has always been a huge fan of that film and I have no problem believing his involvement is genuine.
 

Worth

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Spielberg may have played a larger role in this because of The Shining sequence in Ready Player One.
 

Robert Harris

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WB publicity is the innocent party here. They need not understand the technical niceties of cuts, dates and lengths, and must merely mimic what they’re told by the tech people.

When one has various cooks involved in projects, marketing and truth become muddled.

I recently saw a 4k screening of a film called 2001, being publicized as the “un-restored” version, presumably the Nolan cut.

That would be the 4th, or possibly 6th version of the mysterious film, presumably produced by scanning the 65/15 printing negative, and down-rezzing, after trimming all of the extraneous black that was added, so that it would fit a screen.

Some venues haven’t a clue what they’re running.

As to The Shining, the WB publicity is crystal clear. The forthcoming 4k disc, at least, is described as follows: “The 4K remastering is of Kubrick’s original 146 minute version of the film which premiered in the United States on May 23rd, 1980.”

Simple.
 

haineshisway

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People elsewhere are already expecting this to have the deleted two-minute hospital scene at the end. I don't believe it will be, not for an iota of a second. As someone has already pointed out, the Cannes runtime is 143 minutes, not 146. Someone from some article somewhere said he deleted the sequence during the third week of its run - which is balderdash. I was deleted the first weekend. I saw it on opening day, it was in, and then about five days later and it was out.
 

lark144

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People elsewhere are already expecting this to have the deleted two-minute hospital scene at the end. I don't believe it will be, not for an iota of a second. As someone has already pointed out, the Cannes runtime is 143 minutes, not 146. Someone from some article somewhere said he deleted the sequence during the third week of its run - which is balderdash. I was deleted the first weekend. I saw it on opening day, it was in, and then about five days later and it was out.
Hi, Bruce. I would have agreed with you, about the 143 cut being released on 4K, as opposed to the 146 minute cut. However, balderdash or not, I received the following in an email from WB today, which I assume everyone else who has ever bought anything from the WB shop received as well.

"Widely regarded as one of the greatest horror films ever made, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining comes to 4K Ultra HD on October 1st.

The 4K remastering was done using a new 4K scan of the original 35mm camera negative at Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging. Filmmaker Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick’s former personal assistant Leon Vitali worked closely with the team at Warner Bros. during the mastering process.

The 4K remastering is of Kubrick’s original 146 minute version of the film which premiered in the United States on May 23rd, 1980."
 

haineshisway

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I think in the end you'll find that it is the cut that has always been since the two-minute sequence was deleted, but I'm happy to be surprised, but NOT if it's actually part of the film. As an extra or an alternate version, fine.
 
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Reggie W

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The Kubrick powers-that-be have changed their minds before, from first claiming that Kubrick wanted his "flat" films all presented in open-matte 1.33:1, to insisting that 1.77:1 was the proper aspect ratio for BARRY LYNDON for a time.
I recall a lot of internet debates about there being differences in how certain films should be shown but if I recall correctly when people actually went back to look at that and things Kubrick himself had said that what they discovered was there was no real debate. Kubrick had always been consistent with how he wanted his films presented. The only discussions he had about presenting the films differently came with regards to how they would appear on old TV screens and hence on VHS or other earlier forms of home video formats. In terms of how he wanted them shown in a theater I do not think there was ever a debate and he remained quite clear. So, on aspect ratios I think, to the best of my memory, the debates about that were overblown and really ended up not representing Kubrick's thoughts at all.

On showing footage Kubrick had cut from films, well, if I recall correctly Vitali addressed that when it came out that all the cut scenes from 2001 still exist. His answer was a definitive "It will never be seen again." and the reasoning was if Kubrick cut it, he did not want an audience to ever see it because Kubrick's feelings were if you saw it you could change how you feel about the film. I think what Vitali actually hinted at is if Kubrick were around when that footage was rediscovered he would have asked for it to be destroyed...for the specific purpose of eliminating the chance that someone would attempt to show it again after he was gone.

So, it would never be added as a special feature and it would certainly never be reinstated in the picture to recreate an earlier cut. The final word was if Kubrick cut it while he was alive, it was never meant to be seen again in any form.

I mean my feeling was it would be interesting to view footage Kubrick cut from an educational standpoint but even in that regard the people that support Kubrick's wishes do not condone showing cut footage it would seem.

So, while The Shining is the only Kubrick film with two "authorized" versions...well...I do not think based on their previously stated positions that we will see the hospital scenes again. Not as a special feature, not on a train, not on a plane, and not with a side of green eggs and ham.

UNLESS...

At some point in the future when nobody is left around to defend Kubrick's position somebody decides to go for a cash grab by showing his cut footage again. Even that though seems pretty unlikely.
 
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Billy Batson

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Yeah, if there were 16:9 TVs 20 years earlier, then Kubrick wouldn't have been at all fussed about 4x3 for his films. I'm thinking that he couldn't bear the thought of his films being panned & scanned for TV...& I don't think we'll be seeing the hospital scene (but I would like to see it as an extra).
 
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Worth

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The 4K remaster is playing here this weekend. If I can, I'll check it out and see what's what.
 

johnmcmasters

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I took a day off from work and stood in line all morning on Friday, May 23rd, 1980 so that I could see the first showing of "The Shining" at the Sutton on NYC's Upper East Side (the ad I found in an archive for the NY Times shows 12:45 as the first playtime). I stayed and watched the film three times that day (maybe four times actually as the ad indicates that they had a midnight showing, too) with different audiences. Each time there was a laugh at the shock edit reveal of Jack in the snow following the hospital scene. There was something about the transition from the mundane tranquility of the hospital scene to the abrupt close-up of Jack frozen in the snow that triggered a laugh. When I went back on Saturday to watch the film a few more times, the hospital scene was gone - and there were no laughs at Jack's reveal. I'm sure my memory of the editing that included the sequences with the hospital scenes is faulty -- but I remember it as Danny backtracking and escaping from the maze and getting into the rover driven by his Mom, Jack wailing and swinging his axe in the maze, then the rover disappearing into the snow storm, then a transition to the hospital with elevator doors (!) opening to reveal Mr. Ullman, then the scene with Danny in the hospital bed, his Mom, and Mr. Ullman, then the shock cut to Jack in the snow, then the dolly into the photo, and...the end.
 
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Peter Apruzzese

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The hospital scene was *after* the shock cut of frozen Jack. You can see traces of the edit in the older video versions because the edit point had/has a little bump from that shot to the tracking shot.
 

lark144

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John, I also saw THE SHINING at the Sutton on opening day, and my memory of the hospital scene is different then yours. Yes, audiences laughed at the hospital scene, but not because of the shock cut, which came before the hospital scene, but because what was being said seemed so mundane and out of place, and also kind of silly. It's probable that Kubrick intended the humor of the hospital scene purposefully, to kind of bring people back down gently from the horror, but it didn't work with that audience.

If I'm not mistaken, Kubrick was at the Sutton that day, gauging the audience reaction, and it was his decision to cut the scene, which I think was a good one. I'm not certain if they are actually putting back the hospital scene at the end of the film, but it may play better in the comfort of one's home. It didn't work at all with the audience at the Sutton, though that wasn't the typical Sutton audience, which was usually a middle-aged art house crowd. (I managed a theater around the corner, so I know where of I speak. At the time, we were playing CALIGULA, and the two ticket holder lines became intertwined, and it was my job to separate them. Both groups were pretty rowdy, though I would say the audience for THE SHINING was more oriented towards teenagers.)
 
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Radioman970

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really love that cover.

I don't think i'm going to buy the movie though. first vhs I ever bought (with Time Bandits bought at a mall that is now gutted and looks like it could be the location for The shining 2 lol ), 2 DVDs, and finally the blu ray that looks damn good. I might be done.

might.

be.

danny.

danny BOY!!!!!

oh no!!! I'm not going to buy the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to oh no!!! I'm not going to buy the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to oh no!!! I'm not going to buy the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to

oh no!!! I'm not going to buy the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to
oh no!!! I'm not going to buy the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to
oh no!!! I'm not going to buy the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to

oh no!!! I'm not going to
buy the movie
again
not
going to buy the movie again
not going to oh no!!! I'm not going to buy
the movie again not going to buy the movie again not going to
 

Brian Kidd

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Man, Best Buy is making some profit margin off these exclusive steelbook releases. Not for me though, as I can't justify spending that extra $5 for some cheap metal.
I notice they often tend to still have a ton of them in the stores these days. I like the Steelbook cases when they have excellent, thoughtful art, but many of the Best Buy ones are pretty generic and not worth the extra dough.
 

johnmcmasters

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Thanks for the corrections to my faulty memory -- in looking at stills of the hospital scene, several of them show Mr. Ullman interacting with Danny at a nurses station in the hallway which I had blanked out, too. For me at least the problem was that the film had been built up as the epitome of terror and horror -- and the trailer with the elevator gushing gore, while brilliant, really "oversold" the film in terms of gore and bloodshedding terror. The audience, and thanks for your recollections, was really primed for an ultimate, gory, horror film. "The Shining" certainly wasn't that film. I recall that there were also a few laughs when there was a dramatic insertion of a simple time and date with a music cue. The film has grown on me over the years but I find it more of a black-comedy domestic tragedy now rather than an all-out horror film.
 

lark144

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John, I don't know if I have the stamina to discuss whether THE SHINING is a horror film, let alone a good one. Everyone I know has a different opinion on the matter. When I first saw the film I also felt that the humor and links to historical as well as inherited trauma made the film less scary, but now I am of the opposite opinion. For example, Jack Nicholson was much criticized at the time the film came out for acting crazy from the beginning, and not giving a modulated performance. In later interviews, he revealed that he tried to give a subtler performance, but Kubrick wouldn't let him, as he kept filming hundreds of takes, trying to get Nicholson to act more outrageous, which Nicholson tried to resist, but finally at take 300 or so finally gave in, gave Kubrick the cartoonish exaggeration he wanted, and Kubrick would only print the last take. Yes, Nicholson is funny, but also really scary. The reason he is scary I think is found in what one of the ghosts say to Jack Torrence, "You have always been here." And of course, that final tracking shot--which is why the hospital scene didn't work because it interrupted the flow from the shock cut of Jack Torrence's frozen form--to a photograph of Jack Torrrence at the Overlook in 1921, I believe. Jack Nicholson's Jack Torrence acts crazy from the beginning because, unknown to him, he is already a ghost when the film begins; haunted by the sins of the past, which have through osmosis or inheritance become his sins, He's always been at the Overlook. It's in his blood and his genes. In fact, all of us have always been at the Overlook. And today I find that concept absolutely chilling.

Beyond that, and I don't know, John, if you would consider this important, but as a horror film, THE SHINING has been incredibly influential. In particular, a major influence on what I consider three of the greatest and most influential horror films of the 1980's and early 90's: VIDEODROME, POLTERGEIST & NIGHTBREED.
 
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Robert Harris

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Running time corrected to 144 minutes
 
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