The perfect projector?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Jarett, Sep 11, 2004.

  1. Jarett

    Jarett Stunt Coordinator

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    hey all,
    I;m looking for a great projector for cheap...I know sometimes those things do not mix. I have researched a lot and clearly the x1/x2 stands out. Although...I does not have component which bums me out...Why couldn't have they poped some component ins on the x2?? lol...anyways this is what I want in my projector: component, s-video, composite, DVI(maybe, i'm not sure what this is), 1000-3000 lumens, 1000-2000 contrast ratio, DLP or LCD but i'm not to sure about the screen door affect and lack of black in LCD, or the rainbow effect in DLP. 4:3 or 16:9, please state why each one is better. I will be using it for TV, DVD, VHS. Price range - under 3000 canadian dollars. Thanks for your help.

    Jay

    In regards to 4:3 or 16:9, my room will be 10'6" by 18 feet, and I want two rows of seating with the biggest screen possible with no quality comprimise. Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    For screen size: set up the two rows of seats and then use the projector to cast an image on the bare wall. adjust the size until it is the largest size the front-row patrons can see without too many video-problems (problems caused by the low-res. DVD format, and any projector shortcomings). The 2nd row will be further from the screen, and the image will slightly softer back there anyway.

    Once you have the best, largest screen size you can view comfortably, buy or build/paint a custom screen. There's no point in buying a $599 96" screen from draper or da-lite if you'll really want (or need) a 110" or 80" screen.
     
  3. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    If you want component why don't you go for the Infocus 4805?
     
  4. Ian-Fl

    Ian-Fl Second Unit

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    The x1 does have a component input. You just need an adapter for it.
    http://www.directdial.com/ca/shopinf...VESA-ADPT.html
    That adapter will only work with a DVD player with a progressive scan output. For interlaced signals you need this
    http://www.directdial.com/ca/shop/item/SPVIDEOADPT.html
    I've even seen a DVI input adapter for the X2.
    For cable TV and VCR I don't Know about the quality of picture with the Infocus and it's Faroudja chip. I've read people are quite pleased with a satellite picture and the x1.
    My projector doesn't have a good deinterlacer so I'm going to try a $80.00 TV capture card in my PC this week. Judging by the mpeg samples I've seen the PQ looks just as good as the PQ on my regular TV, therefore it will look the same on the big screen. It also converts VHS to MPEG I and II.
    You can burn the captured signal onto a DVD or CD disk after.
     
  5. Jarett

    Jarett Stunt Coordinator

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    thanks for your help guys...the problem with the 4805 is that it has a substantially amount of less lumens...so with the adapter it actually gives you the quality of component in the x1? And, I heard some things about the x2 being worse in some areas, somethng about the chip...any help would be great
    Also, whats the "interlaced" version all about, looks like DVi vs. S-video? which is better, my dvd player is progressive scan.
    Thanks,
    Jay
     
  6. Ian-Fl

    Ian-Fl Second Unit

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    There are two kinds of signals you can send to your x1 projector. 480p or 480i. The 480p signal is better and your DVD player is capable of sending a 480p signal using that first adapter.
    For the cable and VCR you'll want to input it into the composite input of the projector from the VCR.
    It's not as good a signal as the 480p input but the Faroudja chip or deinterlacer is suppost to compensate for that.
    You see the expression garbage in, garbage out holds true with projectors and most AV equipment. If you buy a $10,000 plasma screen why would you want to hook a regular cable into it?
    If the signal can be transformed along the way however, whether it's doubled, deinterlaced or scaled to something better then the garbage in is smelling a little better out.
    I've seen Rogers HDTV cable on a Z2 and the resolution was just as good as my progressive scan DVD player is capable of and some say even better. The one problem is HDTV cable costs $60.00 cdn. a month.
    My wife would hit the roof for the two or three programs I'd like to watch per month. So if I can get a picture on my projector with a pci capture card that's just as good as my TV then I'll be happy.
     
  7. Ian-Fl

    Ian-Fl Second Unit

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    By the way 750 lumens for the 4805 is not a low number for a theater projector. Some of the best black levels come from theater projectors with that amount of light. The Z2 is 800 lumens and the Optima H30 is 800 as well. High contrast levels and low lumens results in the best Black levels. All you have to do is watch the beginning of 'Master and Commander' or 'The Punisher' and it will punish a projector with poor Black levels.
    If you want to watch a film with lights on in a room or you want to watch with a bigger screen at a further distance then more lumens are required however, there's a trade off. More light results in brighter picture with less black levels.
    http://www.projectorcentral.com/info...nplay_4805.htm
     
  8. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    JArett, have you scratched CRT projection from your list? As this will provide you the best picture for your money. This only considers picture quality though, not other issues.
     
  9. Jarett

    Jarett Stunt Coordinator

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    hey,
    thanks for all the replys, I have now noticed a majour problem with the DLP, headaches and rainbows...I'f i'm gonna spend 5000 dollars + on a theater i want to be able to have anyone i want over to view it, and if one person is gonna get a headache that makes it not worth it...the problem with LCD is the screendoor and bad black levels...and i have not written out CRTs, i just do not know much about them other than the fact they are huge and very bulky...do you have to replace bulbs in CRT's?...i heard somewhere that the higher speed of colour whell the better, the x1 is 2x and the 4805 is 4x....would say a 5 or 6 times completely nock out rainbows? and if so, what projectors are there...thanks everyone

    jay
     
  10. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    CRTs use tubes, not bulbs, and if they are in good condition, and not worn heavily with improper use by the user(you), they can last a long long time. The "standard" time is 10 thousand hours before you need to get new tubes. Retubing one is a little pricey, but you'd not go through a set of tubes for a LOOOONG time unless you used a projector improperly.

    Yes, they are huge and bulky, they also are the best, unless you want to spend about 30K for a top of the line digital, in which case it's about tradeoffs and preferences.

    What kind of light control do you have?

    You should go audition each of these types of displays in person if at all possible. To see a CRT setup you'll need to probably find forum members with them, as they are not sold much new, and if any dealers still do show them, they are high end dealers who probably won't spend much time with you.(which is why locations, at least ballpark, are very helpful in your profile)
     
  11. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Oh, as for rainbows, yes the faster the color wheel, the less visible they are. I've never seen a single chip withoout seeing rainbows, however I am very sensitive. You need to figure out your own sensitivity, as most everyon won't see them except the video nuts. The only way to completely eliminate rainbows is with a 3-chip design, but 3-chip and "cheap" anything but go hand in hand.
     
  12. Jarett

    Jarett Stunt Coordinator

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    hey,
    well the thing is i have 3 windows in my current room but in the future i will have none. I figure i could just have some heavy duty curtains. But anyways, my own sensitivity to rainbows doesnt matter, because if anyone who goes to my theater sees them its gonna ruin it for me...maybe they are not as sever as they are made out to be? i dono...i'd like to get my feet wet with an old lcd or crt so anything in the 200-300 dollar range let me know...later
    jay
     
  13. Ian-Fl

    Ian-Fl Second Unit

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    Don't be turned off by too much information overload.
    Everybody will tell you LCD projectors are on the way out and yet screendoor is becoming non existent or only visible at 4'. The new Panasonic ae700 is coming out next month and is boasting 2000:1 contrast ratios which is the same as the DLP's. So LCD's are still in the thick of it.
    LCD's are still great entry level plug and play projectors to begin with. They are easy to set up, enjoyable to watch and the Wow factor for visitors is still there.
    You'll have to decide if you're an enthusiastic hobbyist for this kind of thing, then maybe a used CRT is the way to go.
    I've had my theater for two years now it's given me great pleasure for my family and friends and maybe my next step is a used CRT because at this point I feel more comfortable with the idea. When I started my theater I new nothing and depended on my instincts and what I read.
    Now I feel a lot more comfortable about going in other directions.
    So my advise is only bite off what you can chew and don't drown yourself.
     
  14. Jack Spencer

    Jack Spencer Agent

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    Jarett, I am like you on the rainbows/headaches thing. If even one of my guests ever ends up being sensitive to it, it will ruin the entire system for me. I want a huge screen to share with friends and family, not just for myself, and that makes DLP really iffy for me.

    I decided to go with a Sanyo PLV-70. It's one of the best LCDs under $5,000 (US) from what I understand. And it's very bright (2200 lumens), so it will be better with the ambient light in my room. Best of all, nobody will ever get headaches or see rainbows, ever.
     
  15. Gary Shipley

    Gary Shipley Second Unit

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    I agree with Jack. I have the Sanyo PLV-60(which was the predecessor to the PLV-70) and I have no complaints. Although I have no ambient light to deal with, I can turn up the lights in the ht and the picture still looks great. As far as "screen door effect" goes, the only way I can see that is if I'm about 4 feet from the screen. Believe me, you would'nt want to be that close to the screen with any type of projector. At 12 feet from my 106 inch screen, the picture is very good.
     

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