The ONE thing that will help us draw closer to THE TRUE MOVIE THEATER EXPERIENCE

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Fatow, Sep 25, 2002.

  1. Mark Fatow

    Mark Fatow Auditioning

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello all:

    In my opinion, there is one thing that the movie studios still haven't been able to get right with DVD, and that is giving us the "The true movie theater experience." Now I am not saying that their product is not up to snuff (well in some cases this is true), sure we do get the highest quality Digital Surround Sound and video that even surpasses that shown in theaters, and special features and interactivity which ten years ago not many would have imagined. But to me there is something missing. Still in an attempt to recreate the movie theater experience, we have spent a ridiculous amount of money and time on a trying to create a genuine home theater. Sure some of us may have widescreen TVs or projectors, the latest THX ULTRA 2 certified digital surround sound receivers, progressive scan DVD players, even speakers that cost thousands and thousands of dollars, but to me and I am sure many of you would agree, there is still something sorely missing.

    This is something that we seem to have forgotten or just not realized we were missing. It is one of the things that is most enjoyable about seeing a movie in the theater. Braving the opening weekend mobs, the ridiculously high ticket prices, the moviegoers who are seemingly oblivious to the fact that we are in a public movie theater and not their living room, these things a true movie fan just has to shake his head at, and week after week he goes back into the fray. One thing that makes you know that you are in a movie theater (and I am not talking about those annoying people talking on their cell phones or that curiously sticky floor underneath your seat) what I speak of, we all highly anticipate and they are the things that make us want to go to the movies and put up with all that crap in the first place...the theatrical trailers of course.

    You may be thinking, all this about trailers. YES all this about trailers, I love watching trailers and saying to my wife, we have to see that or boy does that look like crap and laugh hysterically. In many cases, sadly of course, the trailers were better than the movie. I just can't wait to see what trailers will be in store when I go see the latest movie. Without trailers before a movie it just doesn't feel the way it should. Now I am not talking about incorporating them into DVD the way Disney has, forcing them on us. I am speaking of doing it right, by giving the viewer the choice, to view the trailers or not. But showing them in a way that would be more reminiscent of watching them in the movie theater.

    Here are my suggestions:


    -Unlike Disney, give viewers the ability to TURN ON or TURN OFF the theatrical trailers through the menu. Once you select PLAY MOVIE the option SHOW TRAILERS or DO NOT SHOW TRAILERS will appear choose the one you want and then enjoy your movie going experience.

    -If you choose the SHOW TRAILERS option The statement:

    "COMING SOON TO A THEATER OR DVD PLAYER NEAR YOU"

    Would show ONLY ONCE before the trailers begin, then actual THEATRICAL trailers of the films meant to be advertised would be shown one after the other with no interruption in between. To add even more to the nostalgia of watching the movie, show some of the same trailers that were shown at the time of its theatrical release. Now the intended marketing message still has been dealt to the consumer, but the more authentic feeling of watching a movie in the theater has been not been compromised.
    - .

    Then the finishing touch:
    Show either a Dolby Digital or DTS Theatrical trailer (according to the sound format chosen) to give us a little reminder exactly why we got into DVD and home theater in the first place.

    This to me would be would bring us one step closer to the true "movie theater experience"

    Let me know what you guys think.
    Mark
     
  2. Adam_WM

    Adam_WM Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2001
    Messages:
    1,628
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm down with the Dolby Digital and DTS previews, but to put trailers on the disc simply for aesthetics is a waste. Use the disc space for extras or more uncompressed video.
     
  3. Daniel J

    Daniel J Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2001
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    [puts down book to check HTF and find new comments to annoy people with]
    Mark, Disney has never forced you to watch trailers- It's already an option- just hit the menu button on your remote and you'll go straight there; Or, you can leave it alone and watch all of the trailers.
    I will agree that the trailers shown add alot to the experience of going to a theater. I even enjoy some advertisments- I was impressed by the Nintendo Gamecube trailer last year, and this spring the Frutopia trailer I saw before AOTC was fantastic. But the fact of the matter is, when studios put their trailers on DVD, it's nothing like the movie theater experience.
    First, you are limited to trailers from the studio releasing the disc- My favorite trailer from AOTC theatrical was the Matrix teaser, and Fox can't put that on the AOTC DVD.
    Second, trailers on DVD tend to be made exclusively for DVD (or television), and lack the quality of those seen in the cinema. Voice work is re-done, clips get longer, they advertise special features, they lack surround effects; these trailers just can't live up to those that we saw in the cinema six or seven months ago. This isn't always the case, but it's the prevailing trend.
    How would I like trailers to be treated on DVD?
    I would like to have a DVD full of the best trailers in my DVD collection, with pre-defined playlists for different categories (by content ratings and by genre) that I could select from, with a randomization factor so I would have to watch the same group of trailers four or five times before I saw the same trailer again. I would also like to be able to choose from the best commercials in cinematic or television release, assigning one or two of them to each different playlist. I would also love to be able to add animated shorts- Warner, Pixar, Mickey Mouse, Roger Rabbit, and any other short (< 8 minute) shorts out there.
    How can I accomplish this today? Using a HTPC it's not that hard to play back trailers and switch to your DVD program, the difficulty is aquiring all that material (with high video quality and surround sound) and organizing it. Warner bros. shorts are still in wide distrobution on TV, so a simple analog capture card will allow you to build up a fairly extensive collection quite quickly. But some of the other material is harder to find- Where, for example, would I get the Frutopia trailer in it's cinema version, with the dts/AC3 track intact?
    And this says nothing of the copyright issues you would be running into- though I sincerely doubt you would find Budweiser knocking your door down for playing a "best of Bud" commercial compilation, Warner might have a word or two to say about the Road Runner preceding Monster's inc...
    When you really think about it, the cinema is the cinema, and I think that the more definition there is between the huge screen and the big screen, the better off we'll be. Frankly, I think it was a mistake to begin broadcasting movies on TV networks back in the day- The TV is small, it's square, and the sound isn't really suited to much more than voice or simple music. It's great for cartoons, sitcoms and serials, but the cinema experience is still best where it was intended. Laser/DVD brings a different factor- that of improved quality, and the addition of things like commentary tracks and special features- and this brings a whole new level of viewing experience; but it's still not the cinema, and I can't understand why people keep pretending that it is.
    Or maybe I'm just nuts.
    [goes back to his book]
     
  4. Andrew_Sch

    Andrew_Sch Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    2,153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I love DTS and THX trailers, but one of the things I like so much about the Senator is the ABSENCE of trailers. I don't mind them, but I sure as hell don't miss them either. Now frickin' commercials and using the movie screen as a damn billboard is another story entirely...[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  5. Andrew_Sch

    Andrew_Sch Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    2,153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Another thing I just thought of: The only good thing about trailers is getting a glimpse of movies you haven't heard of or didn't know about or getting hyped for a release you're really looking forward to. By the time a DVD came out, all the trailers on it would likely be for movies that you've already seen or heard of.
     
  6. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2001
    Messages:
    17,979
    Likes Received:
    2,360
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    I've posted many times that the theater experience is a social one whereas the HT experience is more often than not a sensory experience. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. Still there's nothing that can compare with a packed how with the audience reacting in the way their supposed to. (FOTR and AOTC were perhaps enhanced in my mind by the great theatrical experiences I had with them)
     
  7. Andrew_Sch

    Andrew_Sch Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Messages:
    2,153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    One movie that I loved in the theater with a packed house on opening night but am completely embarrased to own on DVD and now realize how bad it is is the Mummy Returns.
     
  8. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 1998
    Messages:
    8,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    I haqve seen a few members try to duplicate this experience by using a disk of trailers from one of the magazines, and the movie in the second tray of the DVD player. Hmm, while it is nice to get the full experience, I have to agree with keeping the extraneous stuff to a minimum and devoting more space to the movie at hand.
     
  9. Mike_G

    Mike_G Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2000
    Messages:
    1,477
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Mike
    There is a way to do it. I do it. The problem is that doing it violates the (insert explicative here) DMCA and therefore can't be talked about on this forum.

    I make a playlist of trailers in their original audio and video format and show them before the movie starts. Wonderful stuff. All the trailers are from software I own, so no foul there.

    Make a CD of your favorite movie tunes for when people are gathering together, also.

    Check out the HTPC area for hints.

    Mike
     
  10. Scott Simonian

    Scott Simonian Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2001
    Messages:
    1,281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I didnt read this whole thread but Im gonna say that I feel the exact same way about dvds. I would love to see more trailers. Ones that play before the movie would be cool too.
     
  11. Anders Englund

    Anders Englund Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 1999
    Messages:
    426
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  12. Chris Brown

    Chris Brown Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2002
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    -
    If you run an HTPC, you can download a bunch of trailers from the internet (Official trailers from the official websites) and then make a playlist so it plays them before teh DVD.
     
  13. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Messages:
    5,748
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I like the idea Mark! [​IMG]
    To those that dislike using up the valuable space for the trailers .... How about a separate "Trailers" disc on selected DVD releases (probably wouldn't want one with every DVD; too cost-prohibitive). I know we'd then be forced to switch discs to watch the "feature presentation", but, hey, we'd get some trailers.
     
  14. RaulR

    RaulR Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2002
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I guess I'm in the minority here judging from the responses, but I don't want more trailers. I want none at all on a DVD (except for the film's own, and perhaps ones for prequels or sequels). In fact, I want nothing between me and the first frame of the film except the main menu and one press of a button on the remote. Sorry, but the last thing I want after paying for a DVD is to have more ads thrown in my face.

    Besides, films shown in theaters have trailers that are current and of interest to the audience at the time. Trailers on DVDs can only be for other movies on home video that the studio is pushing -- movies that are probably already known to you and done something about (i.e. bought or rented if you're interested, ignored if you're not). How many times are you going to want to watch the same trailers everytime you pop the disc in?
     
  15. John Berggren

    John Berggren Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 1999
    Messages:
    3,238
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think that any studio is welcome to put trailers for other movies as a menu option on the disc, but not as something that preceeds the feature. Also, no trailer should be included for another film until all trailers are included for the film on the disc.
     
  16. Mark Fatow

    Mark Fatow Auditioning

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello all:

    I appreciate all the feedback, and I agree with some of your opinions so I have made a couple of alterations.

    1. The trailers would be the THEATRICAL TRAILERS, the authentic ones that are shown in movie theaters, NOT commercials for DVDs or otherwise.

    2. The trailers will ONLY BE SHOWN before the feature if the viewer selects them via the menu.

    3. They should be trailers for movies which are Coming Soon to theaters, or will be playing in the theaters at the time of the DVD release. This really shouldn't be that difficult. I am sure the movie studios can plan ahead of time which trailers would coincide with the release date of the DVD and wouldn't mind getting the extra exposure. I for one would love to see the trailers (and be able to watch them over and over) for the big upcoming movies. This would really give watching the DVD at home that real "movie theater experience" For example the teaser trailers that are available on websites or shown "Exclusively" on Entertainment tonight. So the excitement would still be there, just like in the theaters, wondering what trailers are going to be on the DVD.

    4. The Dolby Digital or DTS or THX trailer would be shown right before the movie REGARDLESS of whether the trailers are selected or not.

    5. Also if you choose not to show the trailers before the feature, you will still have the opportunity to view them along with the DVD titles trailer, from the special features menu. Although for me this kills the point of having current or teaser trailers altogether, but to each his own.

    With all this intact and the viewer in control, we will get to see the trailers for movies just like they would be shown in the theater. Thus Bringing us closer to the "Movie Theater Experience"

    Please tell me what you guys think.
     
  17. MikeEckman

    MikeEckman Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2001
    Messages:
    1,085
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I respect other people's opinion, but I would care to guess that the vast majority of DVD customers (and that includes the J6Ps) would not agree with you.

    Like others have said, I am all for THX, DTS, and Dolby fanfares, but to ridiculously waste space and put even more obstacles in the way of starting the actual movie isn't something I would support.

    Just my opinion of course.
     
  18. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 1999
    Messages:
    11,061
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Real Name:
    John Williamson
    I love the trailers before a film, it's one of the highlight's of the whole experience for me. On the other hand however, I don't really miss them in my HT either.
    To be honest I actually am finding that I enjoy my HT more than I do the theater. I'm so sick of bad presentations, rude people, long lines and all the other headachs that go with it. I only really go to films that I want to see REALLY badly like 'EP II' and 'Spider-man'. The rest can wait for dvd where I control the experience, not some pimple faced teen who's getting paid less change than you'd find in your average sofa cusions.
    No offense to all you projection booth operators out there. [​IMG]
     
  19. Tom Foley

    Tom Foley Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    From the title of the thread I was thinking you were talking about SMELL-O-VISION - The Aroma of Salt and Butter. [​IMG]
    Mark me down as NO on the trailer thing. Really, the trailer thing is a movie-going tradition, but it kinda has been taken over by TV. There are a few programs out there that just show trailers, and usually they show them the weekend that they appear in theaters. And they show them in OAR, granted it's on a 4x3 screen and in stereo only. But those shows pull together all the trailers from all the movies, rather than the few you see for a particular movie because they are looking for a specific audience.
    Bit budgets on DVDs should not be further strapped by trailers for movies that have nothing to do with the feature presentation. I'd take a commentary track over a trailer anyday.
    Besides, I just see trailers in the theaters as a built-in buffer for chronically late people such as myself so I don't miss a second of the movie. Really, where I look for trailers is during big TV events like the Super Bowl. I can remember many a trailer that had me saying in January, "Oooohh, I can't wait for the summer!"
    Here's a quick cheap way to replicate the true movie experience. Spill some soda in front of your couch a few hours before you plan to watch. Have your significant other yell out "Oh no he DIDN'T" at random times during the movie. And finally, leave your cell phone on.
     
  20. RaulR

    RaulR Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2002
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mark,

    I think what you're describing is more feasible for pay-per-view broadcasts or (the late, unlamented) DiVX. These formats require you to pay every time you watch a film, which is in my opinion THE one thing that really sets a movie-theater experience apart from the home-theater viewing.

    Again I ask, even if the trailers are for current or upcoming releases at the time of the DVD's release, how many times are you going to want to watch them?

    I have no objections to putting any kind of studio promos on a disc as long as they're available via a separate menu selection that I can ignore if I want to, and as long as they don't allocate space for them that could have been used for worthwhile extras related to the film on the disc. In your most recent post, it sounds like you're describing a mechanism whereby you can select a menu item that plays all the trailers and then automatically branches from the end of the last trailer to the start of the feature. Fair enough -- as long as it's not the default "Play" command on the main menu. I would be extremely annoyed if I had to resort to selecting a special menu item just to avoid seeing dated trailers on a year-old DVD.
     

Share This Page