The Lion King (2019)

Jake Lipson

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According to you and those that agree with you.
Well, yeah, I didn't think I needed to qualify the fact that my post is my opinion. What else would it be?

That being said, even though he wasn't "treated with the same level of respect," Elton still did the new end credits song for the movie, so I'm sure he was happy to cash Disney's disrespectful check.
 

Robert Crawford

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Well, yeah, I didn't think I needed to qualify the fact that my post is my opinion. What else would it be?

That being said, even though he wasn't "treated with the same level of respect," Elton still did the new end credits song for the movie, so I'm sure he was happy to cash Disney's disrespectful check.
You didn't need to qualify it, but it bothers me when people state their opinion like it's a fact.
 

SamT

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This was a great disappointment for me. This happens when you want to remake exactly the original and the original is a musical with beautiful and classic songs and your actors can't sing. This was like a pale fifth generation photocopy of the original. There was not even a single good song in this for me. It was like a bad karaoke night.
 

Jake Lipson

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Barry Jenkins has signed on as director for a sequel for some reason.

Mike Flemming Jr. for Deadline said:
They are keeping the logline under wraps, but I’m told that the story will further explore the mythology of the characters, including Mufasa’s origin story. Moving the story forward while looking back conjures memories of The Godfather: Part II, set on the African plain with a continuation of the tradition of music that was a key part of the 1994 animated classic, the 2019 film and the blockbuster Broadway stage transfer.

Barry Jenkins said:
“Helping my sister raise two young boys during the 90s, I grew up with these characters. Having the opportunity to work with Disney on expanding this magnificent tale of friendship, love and legacy while furthering my work chronicling the lives and souls of folk within the African diaspora is a dream come true.”

I love Barry Jenkins as a filmmaker, but not enough to suffer through another monstrosity like The Lion King remake which I did not enjoy at all, stylistically or otherwise. No way.

This will be a huge waste of his incredible talent.
 
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Josh Steinberg

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Barry Jenkins has signed on as director for a sequel for some reason.
I don’t see why it’s a mystery.

He’ll be handsomely paid and given virtually unlimited resources to construct a film that, by his own admission, is from a property that is personally meaningful to him. That you didn’t like it doesn’t take away from the fact that over a billion dollars worth of customers did.
 

Jake Lipson

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That you didn’t like it doesn’t take away from the fact that over a billion dollars worth of customers did.
Actually, we don't know that. My $15 or whatever it was to see the film opening night in premium format is in that billion dollars. Not all billion dollar films are liked by the people who turn out to see them or are guaranteed to generate a successful sequel. I'm sure some people liked it, but I wouldn't make a big bet on the sequel attracting similar numbers. Alice in Wonderland grossed a billion in 2010 and kickstarted the recent Disney remake trend, but no one really seemed to care about it all that much. The sequel grossed only $276 million worldwide and was a total bomb.

The sequel to Maleficent also underperformed relative to its predecessor ($758 million for the first one worldwide, $489 million for the sequel.) You can even include 102 Dalmatians from back in 2000 in this pattern. 101 Dalmatians made $304 million worldwide in 1996, but 102 made only $66 million worldwide in 2000.

The first time Disney remakes an older property, it succeeds in large part due to the nostalgia for the source film. Anytime they have done a sequel to one of the remakes yet, it has failed to find the same level of success with the audience. Just because a bunch of people turned out in large numbers for the initial remake doesn't mean they liked it enough to support a sequel.
 
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