The KoKo The Clown TV Cartoon Show 1916

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Tom_mkfty, Jun 20, 2005.

  1. Tom_mkfty

    Tom_mkfty Stunt Coordinator

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    That is listed in, www.tv.com

    Probably considered the first TV show. Premiered January 1, 1916.

    I didn't think there WAS such a thing as TV back then.

    I might buy a cheap public domain DVD on this.
     
  2. Tory

    Tory -The Snappy Sneezer- -Red Huck-

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    My guess is that this was like The Bugs Bunny Tweety Show, showng old cartoons. It is the Out of the Inkwell Series by Max Fleischer. Ray Pointer's Inkwell Images Ink has a nice collection of these on DVD which can be bought off of amazon or www.inkwellimagesink.com
     
  3. Joe Lugoff

    Joe Lugoff Cinematographer

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    Yes, that's a silly comment to find on tv.com.

    I was shocked enough when I first learned that people (very rich people) had television back in the 1920s -- but it can't be pushed all the way back to 1916.

    As Tory suggested, the show just showed old (very old) cartoons that were shown in theaters originally (or maybe nickelodeons!)
     
  4. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Nobody, rich or poor, had anything identifiable as television in the 1920s. What work there was in the area of transmitting moving images over the air (mostly electromechanical systems) at that time consisted of laboratory experiments. Nobody had a receiver in their home and no one was broadcasting anything the could be called programming. That had to wait until the 1930s. The first real TV programming service was the BBC's, which started broadcasting in the late 1930s, amid the gathering clouds of war. Service was suspended when WWII officially began in September 1939 and didn't resume until after the fighting ended. TV was similarly more of a curiosity than anything else in the U.S. until after the war.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  5. Tom_mkfty

    Tom_mkfty Stunt Coordinator

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    What defines a TV show.

    Old movies originally made for the big screen, have only been seen on television on "The Late Show" and such, for generations.

    To some, old movies are TV shows.

    I have only seen, the Little Rascals, Three Stooges, and the cliff hanger serials on television, but they were originally made movie theatres. So were Betty Boop and Popeye.
     
  6. Tom_mkfty

    Tom_mkfty Stunt Coordinator

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    I wonder when the commercials began.

    Now the big screen has commercials.
     
  7. Joe Lugoff

    Joe Lugoff Cinematographer

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    Then I better throw away my "History of Television" book, which I thought was good.

    Googling has told me that the first TV images were transmitted to a receiver in 1929.

    At this stage, I don't know any more what's right or what's wrong, so I'm going to go watch some DVDs. [​IMG]
     
  8. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    It depends. Strictly speaking commercials (and ratings to measure the audience and set ad rates) go back to radio - television really began as radio with pictures, rather than movies delivered electronically. That origin in the pre-existing broadcasting system shaped early television decisively. Early TV in America grew out of the broadcast powerhouses of New York. The Hollywood studios wouldn't become involved (reluctantly) until the foundations had been laid. (NBC and CBS had started as national radio networks. NBC had two of them, the Red and Blue networks. When anti-trust decisions forced them to unload one of them, ABC was born.)

    So in the U.S., where radio had always been commercial and privately funded, TV just transferred the radio model wholesale to the new medium. (Including series like Gunsmoke and personalities like Jack Benny.) In the U.K., where radio started as a government monopoly, the BBC television service began as a non-commercial, tax-supported system.

    In short in the U.S. commercials were part of television from the beginning and ultimately trace their origins to advertisements sold in newspapers and magazines, which established the "so many bucks for so many eyeballs" formula later adopted by radio.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  9. Tom_mkfty

    Tom_mkfty Stunt Coordinator

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    Could the Little Rascals and Three Stooges be considered TV show? They are series.
     
  10. Bob-R

    Bob-R Agent

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    Those were originally shown theatrically, they are not TV shows, both are a series of short films, the same also applies to Laurel & Hardy, Tom & Jerry, Looney Tunes...and that's just a short list.
     
  11. MarcoBiscotti

    MarcoBiscotti Producer

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    Koko The Clown was NOT a TV character, he was a character from Max & Dave Fleischer's "Out Of The Inkwell" films animated theatrical series from 1927/28 and some extremely thoughtful and excellently produced DVD's can be found through Mr. Ray Pointer's website - www.inkwellimagesink.com - collecting the films and putting them into historical context via some wonderful features. Ray Pointer is an animator, film historian, and expert on the subject of early animated silent films and Fleischers library in general. I strongly reccommend his dvd series which collects the best available prints of these films in circulation. Check out his website and support these incredible releases!
     
  12. Jeffrey Nelson

    Jeffrey Nelson Screenwriter

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    According to Pointer's site, the Fleischers' "Out Of The Inkwell" series actually ran from 1919 to 1927. Ko-Ko was born and christened in 1923. I picked up a Republic Home Video laserdisc over a decade ago which contains 10 silent Ko-Ko The Clown cartoons that aren't included on Pointer's Ko-Ko DVD. Boy am I glad I held onto that!
     
  13. Michael.J.Hayde

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    Fleischer's clown character does date back to around 1916. However, many people have forgotten that there was a series of made-for-TV cartoons starring Koko, produced by Hal Seeger in the early 1960's. (Max Fleischer appeared in the first one.) I picked up an old 16mm print of one of these at Cinevent two years ago, and was astonished to find that it was in color. (Animation historian Jerry Beck confirmed for me that it was originally produced in color.) I'd watched the show as a child, long before we'd gotten a color set.

    It was a typical made-for-TV cartoon product. Koko had a girlfriend and there were a couple of other supporting characters. In any case, that's the actual Koko "TV show" - but I guess TV.com is going by the actual film debut of the character, not the show.

    Michael
     
  14. Ray Pointer

    Ray Pointer Auditioning

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    Commercials were there from the begining, starting in 1948.
     
  15. Regulus

    Regulus Cinematographer

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    The first Television Broadcast in the US was President Franklen D. Rooseveldt opening the 1939 World's Fair. One day, while I was killing some time in a Library I got a Microfilm Copy of The New York Times because I wanted to see what the Weather Forecast for the Detroit Area was on Pearl Harbor Day (It was , what else, Cloudy with a High in the Upper 30s-Typical for Michigan that time of the year!) I was surprised to see, in a corner of that page, The Days Television Listings (There were probably more "Good" Shows showing then on the Two Channels that what's playing on Todays 200+ Channels![​IMG]

    As we all know WWII Occured, and Television dod not "Take Off" until the late 1940s. Many of the Cartoons, Short Films and Serials that played in the Theatres became the first TV Shows.
     

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