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t1g3r5fan

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Mychal Bowden
Though mostly forgotten today here in the United States – with the exception of his films The House of the Seven Gables (1940) and The Invisible Man Returns (also 1940) for Universal – Joe May was one of the pioneering figures of German cinema. Beginning his career as a stage director of operettas, he moved into the burgeoning film career in pre-WWI Berlin and eventually started his own film production company in 1915. Following the end of the war, he opened up a film studio in Woltersdorf and would begin work on a few epic length exotic adventures, of which The Indian Tomb was among one of three in a three-year period. Kino has licensed the film for its Blu-ray debut.



Mysteries of India, Part I: Truth (1921)



Released: N/A
Rated: N/A
Runtime: 120 min




Director: Joe May
Genre: Adventure, Fantasy



Cast: Olaf Fønss, Mia May, Conrad Veidt...

Continue reading...


 

Capt D McMars

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This fascinating story was remade during the Nazi regime, followed ultimately by the Lang version. All follow the basic outline of the story with interesting variations.
Debra Pagent and Lang's eye and in color was a great buy. I'd love to do a side by side comparision to see how each tell the same story...it would be interesting I think.
 

Mark Mayes

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Mark Mayes
This fascinating story was remade during the Nazi regime, followed ultimately by the Lang version. All follow the basic outline of the story with interesting variations.
The 1937 films are terrific and resemble American serial adventures from that era. I prefer them to the 50s versions and find them at least as interesting as the Veidt version.

Very fine work by the enigmatic actress called La Jana and the actor Hollywood knew as Phillip Dorn.
 

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Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
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Apr 1, 2004
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949
Interesting. I didn't know about a 1930s version. Kino Classics' release of "The Indian Tomb" (1921) looks really nice. It's a grand adventure tale. Part One is a bit on the slow side, but it's setting everything up for an exciting and suspenseful Part Two.

I wish more of the vintage adventure/serialesque/pulpy 'blood-and-thunder' fare of the silent days was made available on disc. The American material (not that a lot survives) seems to be on the lower-end of the pecking order when it comes to restorations and disc releases. Ditto for its western-genre kin. I'm glad that at least some of the foreign items are available, like Louis Feuillades's classic chapterplays from France. Also, Milestone recently released Italy's "Filibus" (1915), about the lady air-pirate and arch-criminal who descends down from her zeppelin to heist things and cause trouble. It's quite a hoot. In fact, I think I'd rather take my chances in 1915 Italy with Filibus than be in 1915 Paris and meet up with Irma Vep. Filibus might frame me for a robbery and get me stuck with a jail sentence, but scary Irma Vep would more likely shove a hatpin in my temple, steal my wallet, and dump my lifeless carcass on the roadside.
 
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Capt D McMars

Movie Explorer
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Colorado
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Todd Doc Sigmier
Interesting. I didn't know about a 1930s version. Kino Classics' release of "The Indian Tomb" (1921) looks really nice. It's a grand adventure tale. Part One is a bit on the slow side, but it's setting everything up for an exciting and suspenseful Part Two.

I wish more of the vintage adventure/serialesque/pulpy 'blood-and-thunder' fare of the silent days was made available on disc. The American material (not that a lot survives) seems to be on the lower-end of the pecking order when it comes to restorations and disc releases. Ditto for its western-genre kin. I'm glad that at least some of the foreign items are available, like Louis Feuillades's classic chapterplays from France. Also, Milestone recently released Italy's "Filibus" (1915), about the lady air-pirate and arch-criminal who descends down from her zeppelin to heist things and cause trouble. It's quite a hoot. In fact, I think I'd rather take my chances in 1915 Italy with Filibus than be in 1915 Paris and meet up with Irma Vep. Filibus might frame me for a robbery and get me stuck with a jail sentence, but scary Irma Vep would more likely shove a hairpin in my temple, steal my wallet, and dump my lifeless carcass on the roadside.
If your tastes lean towards the Silent classics, Filibus fits the bill in spades. Also a big fan of Judex or Fantomas!! There are many devout collectors of these and other silent films...I am one of them as well!!
 

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