The importance of selecting or creating the right environment to watch specific films

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Nils Luehrmann, Jun 1, 2004.

  1. Nils Luehrmann

    Nils Luehrmann Producer

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    MODS: I have no idea where this topic should be located (mostly about watching DVDs, but also about commercial theaters, and home theaters, so feel free to move it to where ever you all feel is best.


    OK, so I was reading David Boulet's excellent review of the new Collector's Edition DVD of Flirting With Disaster (Outrageously Recommended BTW) and in his review he made the following observation: This is so true. Laughter is contagious and so even if only a few react to a joke, their laughter will often cause the rest of the viewers to laugh and in general will heighten the enjoyment of the experience.

    This is also why sit-com producers will use laugh tracks or record a live audience's reactions (sometimes even both at the same time) in order to get a stronger positive reaction from the viewers.

    Of course sometimes this will often result in a domino effect where the laughter simply takes on a life of its own and can then detract attention away from the 'show'.

    In general I personally prefer a large audience when watching comedies, musicals, and action films. As such I will often invite several folks over to watch those styles of films.

    Interestingly though, I prefer to watch psychological thriller/horror films by myself and late at night as that really helps add to the tension of the experience. Watching during a late night Texas thunderstorm is a must! [​IMG][​IMG]

    My wife has made me stop a scary movie on several occasions when the combination of the thunderstorm outside and the terror on the screen got to be too much. I think the last time that happened was a screening of 'What Lies Beneath' during the scene where Michelle Pfeiffer's character is alone in the house during a storm. After a huge clap of thunder shook the windows she screamed and that was the end of that. The projector was immediately turned off and every light in the house was turned on. [​IMG] After that it was several weeks before she finally watched the film to the end.

    All of this reminded me how much the 'environment' of a room effects the way we react to a film. The effects can be quite drastic, and yet it seems at least many, including myself often neglect or overlook the importance of selecting or creating the right environment when watching a film. This goes for when we watch films in commercial theaters and at home.

    Deciding when to see a film, with whom, and where can and likely do play vital roles in the level of enjoyment you will have from the experience.
     
  2. Nate Anderson

    Nate Anderson Screenwriter

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    I agree. I generally tend to enjoy comedies and action films with others. On the other hand, I find thrillers and horror films more effective by myself or with smaller groups. Same goes for dramas just because that genre seems to require more concentration and that doesn't happen with large groups of friends.
     
  3. Nathan V

    Nathan V Supporting Actor

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    So true. If I'm watching a drama, I need complete silence. I cannot have people walking around, or lights being turned on, or people eating food, or any other kind of disturbance. I prefer a quiet, dark environment for all films, but it's most necessary when viewing dramas. I like being alone or with a couple of friends.

    However, nothing beats being in a massive theater filled with people who you know are all very much into the film; the 70mm rerelease of Lawrence of Arabia and Apocalypse Now Redux at Cinerama are examples of that. The audiences were very keyed into the films, quiet when they needed to be, laughing at the appropriate spots, etc. Not your typical multiplex audience. It greatly helps the enjoyment of a film if you're sitting with 500 people who are having a blast.
     

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