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The Great HTF Music Challenge (1 Viewer)

BobO'Link

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Here are a few songs that were banned from airplay...

Wings - "Give Ireland Back to the Irish":
The song was written as a protest against Bloody Sunday, a notorious incident which took place in Northern Ireland on January 30 that year (1972) in which British troops shot dead a number of protesters. At the time the song was #23 in Melody Maker's chart and #19 in the BBC chart but was banned as "unsuitable for broadcasting."



Billy Joel - "Only the Good Die Young":
(It) didn't do very well until church officials around the US heard it and condemned the song. The controversy was great publicity and sent the song up the charts. Joel recalled to the Metro newspaper July 6, 2006 about the controversy stirred up by this number: "That song was released as a single back in 1977, I think. It was not really doing very well, just languishing in the charts. Then it was banned by a radio station in New Jersey at a Catholic university. The minute the kids found out it was banned, they ran out in droves and it became a huge hit. If you tell kids they can't have something, that's what they want. I don't understand the problem with the song. It's about a guy trying to seduce a girl but, at the end of the song, she's still chaste and pure and he hasn't got anything. So I never understood what the furor was about. But I did write a letter to the archdiocese who'd banned it, asking them to ban my next record."



Elton John - "The Bitch is Back":
Elton is the "Bitch." One day when he was in a foul mood, complaining about anything and everything, Bernie Taupin's wife, Maxine, saw him and said "Uh-Oh, the bitch is back." Bernie Taupin, who was Elton's lyricist, thought it was a great phrase. He wrote lyrics around it and Elton put it to music. This was the first hit song with the word "bitch" in the title, which was rather risqué in 1974. Many radio stations refused to play it when it was released, but when it became a hit, most relented and added it to their playlists. A few stations tried editing out the word "bitch," but it appears 42 times in the song and the censored versions sounded ludicrous.



Charlie Rich - "Behind Closed Doors":
Country love songs didn't get much more suggestive than "Behind Closed Doors" in 1973 and some radio stations banned the record initially as being too racy for their listeners.



Pink Floyd - "Arnold Layne":
Radio London banned this song, since it was about a man who steals women's undergarments. The far more conservative BBC played it, indicating they either didn't have a problem with this particular subject matter or didn't understand it.
 

BobO'Link

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And a few more:

Small Faces - "I Can't Make It":
The BBC initially banned the song. Jones commented to Uncut: "The strange thing was that the BBC banned 'I Can't Make It because they reckoned it had some sexual reference, but happily played 'Here Comes the Nice,' which was blatantly about our drug pusher."



And just because it escaped being banned...
Small Faces - "Here Comes the Nice":
"Death, drugs, sex and swearing" were the four reasons to ban songs on BBC radio in the late 1960s. This song, a tribute to the band's dealer, definitely fell into the drugs category. However, despite featuring the unambiguous line "he's always there when I need some speed," it somehow evaded the censors and was freely played on BBC Radio 1. Keyboardist Ian McLagan recalled to Uncut magazine March 2014: "The weird things to me about this song, are (a) that it was never banned, and (b) that it was about Methadrine, which was a horrible drug. I mean, we loved smoking dope."



The Who - "Pictures of Lilly":
This was banned by many radio stations for it's sexual content.



Olivia Newton-John - "Physical":
A few radio stations in conservative communities (including Salt Lake City, Utah) refused to play this song because of its veiled sexual content. This just added to the song's popularity and didn't hurt Olivia's reputation as one of the least offensive women in music.



Loretta Lynn - "The Pill":
Lynn’s iconic hit details more than just the liberation from pregnancy offered by the contraceptive pill, including the fun she will have, the clothes she will wear, how “the feelin’ good comes easy now / Since I got the pill”. Naturally, country radio flipped its wig at the scandalous notion of a woman enjoying sex and banned it widely.
 

jcroy

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On a similar theme of "banned songs", here's some metal tracks which the original record company refused to release back in the day.




WASP - Animal




WASP were originally on the major label Capitol Records back in the 1980s. Capitol refused to release their first album with the song "Animal" on it, for very obvious reasons. ;)

Eventually "Animal" was released by an independent label in the uk.




Slayer - Angel of Death




On Slayer's "Reign in Blood" album, their original record company/distributor Columbia Records refused to release the album due to subject matter of "Angel of Death". The song lyrics were about the infamous Dr Mengele.

Eventually this album was released through a different record company/distributor Geffen Records.

 

TravisR

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On a similar theme of "banned songs", here's some metal tracks which the original record company refused to release back in the day.




WASP - Animal




WASP were originally on the major label Capitol Records back in the 1980s. Capitol refused to release their first album with the song "Animal" on it, for very obvious reasons. ;)

Eventually "Animal" was released by an independent label in the uk.




Slayer - Angel of Death




On Slayer's "Reign in Blood" album, their original record company/distributor Columbia Records refused to release the album due to subject matter of "Angel of Death". The song lyrics were about the infamous Dr Mengele.

Eventually this album was released through a different record company/distributor Geffen Records.


Decades ago, I had heard of that WASP song under its original title but now having heard it for the first time, it's not half as crazy as I had expected. Beyond the "I f--- like a beast" lyric which is pretty wild (and super funny), it's a pretty standard 80's metal song.


Slayer is generally too heavy for me but unlike a lot of bands like that, they're actually playing their instruments well while also playing them incredibly fast. I still enjoy thinking of the episode of South Park where the boys broke up a hippie music festival by playing the great "Raining Blood".
 

JohnRice

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Here are a few songs that were banned from airplay...
If anyone had paid any attention to the words of Aerosmith's "Walk This Way" I'm sure it would have been banned all over the place. It's not exactly hidden, either. It has to be the filthiest song ever written. Not a single obscenity in it, though.

"You ain't seen nothin' 'til you're..."

"Cheerleader was a real..."
 

jcroy

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(More generally).

As to whether something gets "banned" or not, it likely has a lot to do with whether anybody brings it to public (or media) attention and it becomes a huge political (and/or religious) liability that just won't go away with the news cycle.

For example, a lot of extreme "black metal" type music is very "in your face" about satan, death, etc .... but is not really banned anywhere. This is likely due to the fact that it doesn't make any "news" that becomes a "political" liability.
 

John Dirk

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So... Elton John and "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road" - My 2nd favorite Elton John album (favorite is "Madman Across the Water" - an underappreciated masterpiece). Here are a couple of favorites from that album that you rarely, if ever, heard on radio. Taupin could turn out some quite "subversive" type lyrics...

Elton John - "Sweet Painted Lady":



Elton John - "All the Girls Love Alice":

Now there's the Elton John I know and love. I currently own a rag tag selection of Elton's catalogue but no complete albums. I'll be fixing that with the addition of this one, even though I already own most of the hit singles separately.
 

John Dirk

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Here are a few songs that were banned from airplay...

Wings - "Give Ireland Back to the Irish":
The song was written as a protest against Bloody Sunday, a notorious incident which took place in Northern Ireland on January 30 that year (1972) in which British troops shot dead a number of protesters. At the time the song was #23 in Melody Maker's chart and #19 in the BBC chart but was banned as "unsuitable for broadcasting."



Billy Joel - "Only the Good Die Young":
(It) didn't do very well until church officials around the US heard it and condemned the song. The controversy was great publicity and sent the song up the charts. Joel recalled to the Metro newspaper July 6, 2006 about the controversy stirred up by this number: "That song was released as a single back in 1977, I think. It was not really doing very well, just languishing in the charts. Then it was banned by a radio station in New Jersey at a Catholic university. The minute the kids found out it was banned, they ran out in droves and it became a huge hit. If you tell kids they can't have something, that's what they want. I don't understand the problem with the song. It's about a guy trying to seduce a girl but, at the end of the song, she's still chaste and pure and he hasn't got anything. So I never understood what the furor was about. But I did write a letter to the archdiocese who'd banned it, asking them to ban my next record."



Elton John - "The Bitch is Back":
Elton is the "Bitch." One day when he was in a foul mood, complaining about anything and everything, Bernie Taupin's wife, Maxine, saw him and said "Uh-Oh, the bitch is back." Bernie Taupin, who was Elton's lyricist, thought it was a great phrase. He wrote lyrics around it and Elton put it to music. This was the first hit song with the word "bitch" in the title, which was rather risqué in 1974. Many radio stations refused to play it when it was released, but when it became a hit, most relented and added it to their playlists. A few stations tried editing out the word "bitch," but it appears 42 times in the song and the censored versions sounded ludicrous.



Charlie Rich - "Behind Closed Doors":
Country love songs didn't get much more suggestive than "Behind Closed Doors" in 1973 and some radio stations banned the record initially as being too racy for their listeners.



Pink Floyd - "Arnold Layne":
Radio London banned this song, since it was about a man who steals women's undergarments. The far more conservative BBC played it, indicating they either didn't have a problem with this particular subject matter or didn't understand it.

I'll just say I can't believe anyone at any time felt the need to ban any of these songs. As you stated, all that ever does is guarantee a previously mediocre song will likely become sought after. Case in point for me would be The Bitch Is back. There's really nothing special about the song other than it contains Elton's signature feel and structure.
 

John Dirk

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On a similar theme of "banned songs", here's some metal tracks which the original record company refused to release back in the day.




WASP - Animal




WASP were originally on the major label Capitol Records back in the 1980s. Capitol refused to release their first album with the song "Animal" on it, for very obvious reasons. ;)

Eventually "Animal" was released by an independent label in the uk.




Slayer - Angel of Death




On Slayer's "Reign in Blood" album, their original record company/distributor Columbia Records refused to release the album due to subject matter of "Angel of Death". The song lyrics were about the infamous Dr Mengele.

Eventually this album was released through a different record company/distributor Geffen Records.


You have to wonder what they were even thinking recording these songs. I mean who would have released them? I'm not judging the songs themselves just the climate in place at the time of their creation.
 

BobO'Link

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I'll just say I can't believe anyone at any time felt the need to ban any of these songs. As you stated, all that ever does is guarantee a previously mediocre song will likely become sought after. Case in point for me would be The Bitch Is back. There's really nothing special about the song other than it contains Elton's signature feel and structure.
The bannings pretty much served the same purpose as the "Parental Warning" stickers today. Makes something desirable that otherwise would likely languish on the shelves. I remember the hearings on those stickers and that Frank Zappa spoke and pretty much said the same thing. It's not too dissimilar to movies trying for an "R" rating to guarantee attendance.
 

jcroy

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The bannings pretty much served the same purpose as the "Parental Warning" stickers today. Makes something desirable that otherwise would likely languish on the shelves. I remember the hearings on those stickers and that Frank Zappa spoke and pretty much said the same thing. It's not too dissimilar to movies trying for an "R" rating to guarantee attendance.

The 1985 pmrc congressional hearings on this ^ with testimonies by:



John Denver





Frank Zappa





Dee Snider

 

jcroy

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You have to wonder what they were even thinking recording these songs. I mean who would have released them? I'm not judging the songs themselves just the climate in place at the time of their creation.

For many albums, frequently many songs will be recorded which are never released. For example, on the recent Taylor Swift re-recordings of her first five (or six) albums, she includes many unreleased songs which were never used on the original versions of these same albums. So what ends up being on an album, is largely culled from the recording session(s) that the record company executives consider to be possible "hit songs".

With that being said, I'm guessing the Capitol Records executives who had oversight on bands like WASP on their roster, were not watching the recording studio sessions that closely. (ie. Besides paying the studio expenses).


I don't know if that WASP "Animal ... f**k like a beast" song was ever intended to be released back in the day on their first album. In spite of what the singer had said about it many years/decades later, I think there might be some "retcon" going on.



My wild speculation, is that this "Animal" song was likely leaked to various rock music publications shortly before the first album, largely to produce a lot of advanced hype to get attention.
 
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jcroy

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In the case of Slayer "Reign In Blood", I get the impression it was a very different situation than WASP's "Animal". Slayer seemed to be a band that was very consistent in their songwriting about stuff like satan, death, war, violence, etc ... on their first two albums on the indie label metalblade records.

Slayer was signed to the hiphop label DefJam that was mostly distributed by Columbia Records at the time. DefJam's head honcho Rick Rubin would have known about Slayer's writing subject matter, while the Columbia Records executives likely didn't know much about it previously and were shocked by "Angel of Death".

As to why Geffen Records decided to release Slayer's "Reign in Blood", is not entirely clear. My speculation was that the Geffen executives did it for the cash, and were not highly offended by "Angel of Death". If for no other reason, Rick Rubin likely convinced Geffen it would be a huge hit, similar how Metallica "Master of Puppets" was becoming very big around that same time period circa 1986.
 

John Dirk

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The bannings pretty much served the same purpose as the "Parental Warning" stickers today. Makes something desirable that otherwise would likely languish on the shelves. I remember the hearings on those stickers and that Frank Zappa spoke and pretty much said the same thing. It's not too dissimilar to movies trying for an "R" rating to guarantee attendance.
Well, without getting Political, the Parental Advisory label only appeared when Tipper Gore took offense to a Prince song. The first album to bear it was Banned In The USA, by The 2 Live Crew. Here is the song they wrote in protest of this and their subsequent treatment at live performances. Bruce Springsteen allowed his song, Born In The USA, to be sampled in support of their movement.

 
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JohnRice

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I don't think I ever posted this one. A mix of Symphonic Metal and Rap.

Within Temptation feat. Xzibit - And We Run

 

John Dirk

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I don't think I ever posted this one. A mix of Symphonic Metal and Rap.

Within Temptation feat. Xzibit - And We Run


Wow that's loud! :lol:

Not my style of music but I definitely love the genre combinations in play.
 

BobO'Link

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Within Temptation feat. Xzibit, "And We Run" - I didn't care for either style here. Both were just a bit bland and predictable within their genres. The mashup kind of worked but it's nothing I'd listen to again.
 

JohnRice

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Wow that's loud! :lol:

Not my style of music but I definitely love the genre combinations in play.

Within Temptation feat. Xzibit, "And We Run" - I didn't care for either style here. Both were just a bit bland and predictable within their genres. The mashup kind of worked but it's nothing I'd listen to again.
This falls into a category of music I enjoy not because it's fabulous music, but because with a really good sound system it creates a tactile, immersive experience. IOW, it cranks good and really shakes the house.
 

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