1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

The Glenn Miller Story (1954)- coming from Shout! Factory

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by atfree, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. Mark-P

    Mark-P Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,931
    Likes Received:
    2,925
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Camas, WA
    Real Name:
    Mark Probst
    Got my copy. Aspect ratio is 1.85:1 and sound is stereo for both cuts, with optional mono for the 1954 version. Now, was this a three strip production? I only ask because this Blu-ray has some rather unsightly color registration errors.
     
    Brent Reid likes this.
  2. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    46,106
    Likes Received:
    21,847
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert
    Yes, it's a Technicolor film as indicated by the opening credits.
     
  3. Nick*Z

    Nick*Z Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes Received:
    1,636
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Canada
    Real Name:
    NICK
    Honestly, can we just get Uni to start doing basic color alignment on their Blu releases. There's no point to a hi-def transfer if the 3-strip records are so mis-registered it's just a blurry, halo-ridden mess. Warner's ultra-hi-def process used to apply this to all of their 3-strip releases and the results were rewarding. Uni just seems intent on slapping out whatever archived materials they have, sans care or inspection of the elements first. And since not all of the movie is mis-registered, exactly how much would it have cost Uni to simply go back in and fix the few scenes in which the color is atrociously out of whack?!? Time and money, folks. It needs to be spent...correctly!
     
  4. Thomas T

    Thomas T Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    4,383
    Likes Received:
    4,037
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Yes, it's Technicolor but (I stand to be corrected) not three strip Technicolor as Mark P asked about. In 1954 (the year Glenn Miller Story was released), only two films were released using the three strip Technicolor process (Barefoot Contessa, Caine Mutiny) while the majority of films were reverting to straight Technicolor. In 1955, after Universal's Foxfire (coming from Kino Lorber in December), studios abandoned the process entirely (three strip, not Technicolor). I'm sure Bob Furmanek has more precise information on this subject..
     
  5. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    46,106
    Likes Received:
    21,847
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert
    That's my understanding too!
     
  6. haineshisway

    haineshisway Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2011
    Messages:
    4,517
    Likes Received:
    5,204
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Real Name:
    Bruce
    To be clear, "straight" Technicolor was not a filming process, but a printing process. Negatives were Eastman, printing was Technicolor dye transfer, or what we collectors used to love to call IB Tech :)
     
  7. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    46,106
    Likes Received:
    21,847
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert
    Right!
     
  8. Mark-P

    Mark-P Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,931
    Likes Received:
    2,925
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Camas, WA
    Real Name:
    Mark Probst
    In that case, they obviously didn't use the oneg for this transfer then. The source must be some dye-transfer ip (or something) which would account for the registration errors.
     
  9. PatrickDA

    PatrickDA Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    97
    Trophy Points:
    110
    I think it looks okay. Could (should) it look better? Yes! However, didn't Universal (as well as FOX) dump a lot, if not all, of their OCN's in the mid-60's? So, I'm not sure what sort of prints they've got to work with. Would 'Glenn Miller Story' have a lot of of prints in vaults around the world? I doubt it. Although, it was a big hit in '54, so maybe some prints are here and there. Who knows. As I've mentioned before, I think it suffers because of natural comparisons with "SAC," but that blu-ray was helped by the VistaVision photography and (maybe) superior print(s).
     
  10. haineshisway

    haineshisway Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2011
    Messages:
    4,517
    Likes Received:
    5,204
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Real Name:
    Bruce
    Once again, an IP is not dye transfer - dye transfer is a printing process, and IP is an interpositive. I have the German Blu - it's merely okay and I'm assuming this is exactly the same.
     
  11. Mark-P

    Mark-P Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,931
    Likes Received:
    2,925
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Camas, WA
    Real Name:
    Mark Probst
    Hence the "or something" qualifier in my comment. I actually considered saying dye transfer print but figured somebody would just tell me that prints are not used to make HD masters. Nevertheless something has caused registration errors which should not be present here, perhaps it's the result of separation masters having been used?
     

Share This Page