The Future of Bass

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by James Slade, Mar 8, 2002.

  1. James Slade

    James Slade Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2001
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where will we be in five years. To me things seem to be changing SVS and Adire and DIYers and making great bass, for resonable cost. Will the mainstream manufacturers follow? Some subs out there are great like the Paradigm servo15 and the big Velo's etc. But these don't have the bang for the buck of DIY. Are we raising the bar or are we such a small group that we will have no affect on the speaker comapanies like B&W, Energy, Paradigm, Totem, Polk, and a million others?

    I think for sure we will see smaller digital amps with tonnes of power and no fans for reasonable money fairly soon. I personally will never buy another piece of gear with a fan!

    What do you see in the future for commercial and DIY subs?

    Bass doesn't go much lower, and crazy volume levels are here now if you want them, what's next?
     
  2. Manuel Delaflor

    Manuel Delaflor Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 25, 2001
    Messages:
    657
    Likes Received:
    0
    There are no more frequencies, but surely they can sell flatter response.
     
  3. Joe-T

    Joe-T Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2001
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    It would be ideal if these top notch internet businesses would raise the bar and drop the prices of the audio industry as a whole, but I have many doubts. There will always be brand names, local shops, and tradition. The biggest problem with internet audio, is that it costs money (shipping) to audition them and many people are still skeptical about them. Also, there will always be, dare I say, snobs in the consumer population. Hopefully though, it will at least nudge the industry in the right direction. Also, it will make it much more difficult to create new brand names outside of the internet "great product/great price" arena.

    "Call me cynical, but I think they'll just come up with more frequencies so we're forced to upgrade yet again."

    Wait till "Miracle Audio Inc." develops a sub that can play down to negative Hz.
     
  4. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2001
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Besides processing that will easily, cheaply and very effectively allow the taming of roommodes. The only big thing left that I can see really shaking things up for cone subs is for someone to figure out how to break Hoffman's Iron law. Would be kinda cool to have an 8" cube that could put out 121dB at your listening position at 20hz with only 250watts applied :p)
    Although I do agree with Jack and Joe that those negative hz subs will be the end all be all of the next generation. I wonder what strange effects negative hz will have on the human digestive track [​IMG]
     
  5. Greg Br

    Greg Br Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    437
    Likes Received:
    0
    For every one of us there are 20 Bose is the greatest sounding thing for music and HT I heaver heard. Its scary I run into them all the time.
     
  6. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2000
    Messages:
    4,260
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Nick So
    Wow, you can have NEGATIVE frequencies? What do they sound like? maybe they'll open an inter-dimensional hole in your living room and you'll get sucked into a parallel universe.. :p)
     
  7. James Slade

    James Slade Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2001
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well tell me if this is the future, or a stupid idea. Think about if for a few minutes before you discard the idea.

    Two-way subwoofer, with on board eqing. Having two drivers would allow you to really extend low and not bother the higher-end (subwoofer higher end). I think with an eq that flat response would be possible. Drive this with a stereo amp. This would be expensive but hey so are SVS_SS's. With the right crossover and eq is seems possible to me.
     
  8. Thad_C

    Thad_C Agent

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2002
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    While bass will continue to evolve, we must recognize that they have remained fundamentally unchanged for centuries, and are likely to be around long after we depart. They are a hardy, ecologically well-developed fresh water fish.[​IMG]
     
  9. Norman Short

    Norman Short Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thad, I'm still cracking up [​IMG].
    This is a topic I've thought about myself at times. I wonder just how far home audio can go. Digital electronics is still an area we're showing fast improvement in, and material science will hopefully keep enabling people to further stretch the envelope of what we're capable of achieving, but most of the science involved in acoustics is well set, isn't it? I've wondered if we'll ever get audio performance that simply blows away what we're capable of doing at the high end now. I tend to doubt it, but I'm sure people used to think the automobile was a passing fad too, or that it would never truly replace the horse.
    I wonder if perhaps instead we will hit a plateau of excellent sound reproduction and that achieving that quality of sound will simply become cheaper and cheaper. In the electronics area that could easily be true, but loudspeakers will always require other costs.
    On the other hand (I have 3 hands at last count apparently) maybe we'll just get (many would say continue to get) dazzled by BS of ever increasing channels, formats, and features which probably don't great improve the sound we're already capable of. Not sure there's an answer, but it's fun to speculate.
    Norman Short
     
  10. Randy G

    Randy G Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 18, 2000
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    0
    As for NEGATIVE frequencies, aren't they the cause of negative VIBES?
     
  11. Martice

    Martice Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2001
    Messages:
    1,077
    Likes Received:
    0
    Imagine this scenario. You are preserved in a time capsule and you awake in the year 2099 and find all sorts of new technological treasures. Among them you find solar powered homes, flat panal screens which are the norm and has revolutionized the telephone system all together. Automobiles are voice guided and are electric and solar powered as well. The home audio business is still around and you still sort of recognize some of the names from your heyday. Names like Kretta replaced the names of Krell and Theta who have since merged inorder to survive in an industry dominated by the makers of the smallest and most wife friendliest micro panel, multi-reflective speakers in the world .

    BOSE!!!!

    The kicker is that they actually sound good in the future.
     
  12. David_Stein

    David_Stein Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2002
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    >>and material science will hopefully keep enabling people to further stretch the envelope of what we're capable of achieving
     
  13. Jim J

    Jim J Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 1999
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    0
  14. MikeKaz

    MikeKaz Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2001
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    0
    here's an article
    http://popularmechanics.com/technolo...ersonic_Sound/
    the next subwoofer may be no subwoofer if they can digitally add the frequencies right. also, its pretty obvious that some day all of the standard market receivers/amps etc will be fully digital, instead of just a few subwoofer amps as we have today. sharp has already had this for a while, and the prices will drop etc so it will be much cheaper for manufacturers to have the power coming from a few chips instead of a huge power supply and big heatsinks and everything. there will be a contingent of people who swear by the analog amps we are using today, and most people by then will think theyre a little nutty, just like people who insist on tube amps now.
    http://www.stereophile.com/showarchives.cgi?253
    going along with the materials science thing, i think that the whole idea of putting big magnets on a circular diaphragm of whatever and having that move back and forth through a magnetic field that varies with the current applied, and that process becoming less efficient with the heat that is generated because you needed enough current to get that big magnet to move fast enough in the first place and so on is about as low tech as you can get and really behind the curve technologically, looking at the other components in an audio video setup.
    instead of using an electromagnet to move a diaphragm, they could use artificial muscles. basically, just like real muscle, you apply a small electrical current to it, and it contracts. All they would have to do is get it to contract quickly enough for the pretty slow bass frequencies. It could give you a super efficient bass speaker with as much excursion as you want.
    "The artificial muscle would be particularly applicable to microdevices, for which existing actuator technologies are limited; but since it is scale invariant, it could also be used for a wide range of macro applications including robots, speakers, and motors."
    http://www.erg.sri.com/publications/10673-PA-00-087.pdf
     
  15. Manuel Delaflor

    Manuel Delaflor Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 25, 2001
    Messages:
    657
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jim J and MikeKaz

    Most excellent info!

    I think I will halt my savings to buy me a set of Avantgarde Duo's ;-)
     

Share This Page