The Definition of High Definition

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Allan Mack, Mar 10, 2002.

  1. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

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    Wow... Check out this website titled The Definition of High Definition. The pictures show off the capability of HDTV very nicely on the computer screen. I'd love to see a comparison between a HDTV and a non-HDTV signal though...
    (Sorry if this website has been posted before, but I couldn't find it using the search feature.)
     
  2. Darren Davis

    Darren Davis Stunt Coordinator

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    That is a great site. Since I don't have an HDTV I didn't know that those HD channels were so great. Seeing Jay Leno in 16x9 and HD makes it look like a totally different show. Thanks for the link; I'm gonna show this to a few people.[​IMG]
     
  3. Dave Barth

    Dave Barth Stunt Coordinator

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    Football looks great in those wider HD shots. Tennis looks quite odd, though.
     
  4. William Ward

    William Ward Supporting Actor

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    Basketball can also look good in HD with the wider AR. Once cameramen quit following the ball in a halfcourt set and let the camera get all the action, it'll be great. You can see the entire half court(at least from halfway between the half court line and the three line) at a good distance if done properly.

    Football also needs to quit centering the camera on the ball as it's spotted. There's more going on to the left of the camera than the right.(at/before the snap) This was evident with FOX Super Bowl in WS. CBS College Football in HD also had some problems with this. You'd get almost the width of a 16/9 sidebar(watch regular TV in 4:3 mode) with nothing but grass.
     
  5. Paul W

    Paul W Second Unit

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    According to Fox, 480P is considered high-definition.
    Sorry, I couldn't resist.[​IMG]
     
  6. AllenD

    AllenD Second Unit

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    I'm a tennis fan and don't get enough of it in HD. [​IMG] The angle from the bottom pic of Men's Doubles is the sweet spot, IMO. You can see the whole court, and then some during doubles and singles. When players get moved around beyond the doubles alley you loose track of them in regular broadcast. In widescreen you see every step they make when they're trying to get a wide return. It really adds more drama and makes you feel you're in the audience.
    Great site, BTW. Thanks for brining it up. I think I've seen it following an AVS member's sig and it's his page.
     
  7. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    I thought Fox avoided using the term "high definition" and had coined their own term "Fox Widescreen". They say it's "digital high quality". It is high quality compared to NTSC, is it not? I mean the 480p, not the programming.
     
  8. Marque D

    Marque D Stunt Coordinator

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    Actually they like to call it High Resolution Digital Television.
     
  9. Robert Ringwald

    Robert Ringwald Cinematographer

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    Wait, so when ally mcbeal, and malcolm in the middle start. What exactly does that mean. If I have a widescreen tv I can see the widescreen version. I can't imagine that's it. What do they mean at the beginning with that logo exactly?
     
  10. rutger_s

    rutger_s Supporting Actor

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    They mean its not "High Definition" 1080i like ABC and CBS.

    Its "High Resolution" 480p like DVDs.
     
  11. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

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    One thing those stills don't do justice to though is the CROWDS at sporting events. As the camera pans at tennis or football the stands seem ultra-deep with the added fine detail rather than just a blur.

    For me that and the grass on the football field are the 2 things that jump out at me first.
     
  12. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    CBS and NBC (for the two things it actually does in HD) are 1920x1080i. ABC is 1280x720p. Fox is 720x480p, and as I recall, some of that is devoted to more picture on the sides. So the resolution is only a little bit higher than broadcast (and progressive instead of interlaced, which also looks better), but I wouldn't call it "high". Ironically, it is the lowest resolution digital picture you can get.

    Caveat emptor....

    //Ken
     
  13. Marque D

    Marque D Stunt Coordinator

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  14. William Ward

    William Ward Supporting Actor

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    Until companies start making DTV tuners that are bareboned for those folks who still have a regular analog TV, you'll need an HDTV receiver to catch the Fox High Resolution Widescreen broadcasts.

    Think of FOX programming as the difference being:

    A. Film based shows like X-Files, Dark Angel, Malcolm are anamorphic widescreen DVD quality through a progressive scan DVD player viewed on a WS TV.(technically this is how it is, although some of the FOX material I've seen haven't been so hot and might be considered inferior to better DVD transfers)

    B. Live sporting events(Super Bowl and possibly car racing/MLB) are native widescreen and component 480i which should mean better color seperation but not much added resolution. FOX then defeats any added PQ by turning the Edge Enhancement/Aperture Correction/Video Enhancement all the way to 11 like all broadcasted NTSC sporting events do.

    So for sports you get a widescreen version of the NTSC feed. That's about it.

    Not much to make you want to go out and pony up $500 for an HDTV receiver if your favorite programs are on FOX.
     

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