What's new

General Discussion The Criterion Channel Streaming Service (Official Thread) (1 Viewer)

Mike2001

Premium
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
Messages
948
Location
LA South Bay
Real Name
Mike
I find myself watching their documentaries and short subjects more than I do their films. Watched the Frances Marion one yesterday. Fascinating stuff, but the picture suffered from severe upscaling artifacts. It was from 2000 and must have been done originally on video.
 

SultanOfWhat

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Sep 1, 2012
Messages
77
Real Name
Matt
About 2 1/2 years ago, I decided to focus on watching films I'd never seen. Filmstruck was a huge help in that regard, and I managed to watch 75 films through that service over the course of a year before it was cancelled. I was heartbroken when Filmstruck folded, but fortunately I found Watch TCM to tide me over until the Criterion Channel was activated.

I've found that the Criterion Channel helps me move outside my comfort zone and see more new films, including foreign language films. The easiest thing for me mentally is just to go to Watch TCM and pick out a classic Hollywood film I've yet to see, but I like being challenged by the availability of the more eclectic films on Criterion. So I go back-and-forth between the two streaming services.

I've watched 56 films via the Criterion Channel in the past year (including 22 foreign language), so I am going to renew my subscription. Most of the transfers I've watched have been excellent, and the technical glitches have been manageable (such as hitting the "back" button and re-selecting a viewing choice when it doesn't start playing in a timely manner).

As someone who grew up with 7 TV channels (and 13-20", 4:3 aspect ratio tube TVs) I am thrilled to be able to choose from among the astounding number of films available, to be watched in HD on large screens from the comfort of my home.
 

Cranston37+

🇺🇸
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Messages
3,038
Real Name
Patrick
I've watched 56 films via the Criterion Channel in the past year (including 22 foreign language), so I am going to renew my subscription.

If you had to buy those movies on disc, and got them on sale at $20ea, that would have cost you $1,120 + tax, vs. $99 for the subscription ($85 if you get it buy discounted iTunes cards)...

:cheers:
 

Ken Koc

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2004
Messages
2,588
Location
New York
Real Name
Ken Koc
Watching restored classic films that are from major studios as well as foreign films, I watch a film on Criterion Channel 4 times a week. Disney+...not much there for me there. Mandalorian , I was so bored I stopped watching it, but I'' keep Disney+ to see HAMILTON again...unfortunately it will not be the version I saw with the original cast, but a lyrically cleaned up Disneyfied version.
 

Ronald Epstein

Founder
Owner
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jul 3, 1997
Messages
60,139
Real Name
Ronald Epstein
Watching restored classic films that are from major studios as well as foreign films, I watch a film on Criterion Channel 4 times a week. Disney+...not much there for me there. Mandalorian , I was so bored I stopped watching it, but I'' keep Disney+ to see HAMILTON again...unfortunately it will not be the version I saw with the original cast, but a lyrically cleaned up Disneyfied version.


Ken,

Do we actually know HAMILTON will be cleaned up for Disney+?

I have been asking that question for weeks and I can't seem to get a definitive answer.
 

Ken Koc

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2004
Messages
2,588
Location
New York
Real Name
Ken Koc
As they have already released a version on cd
Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording) [Clean],
I fear this is what will happen on Disney +.
A quote from Miranda "I think we’ll figure it out when we get there, but we’re not going to cut any sections of the show. If we have to mute a word here or there to reach the largest audience possible, I’m OK with that, because your kids already have the original language memorized. I don’t think we’re depriving anyone of anything if we mute an f-bomb here or there to make our rating"
 

Ted Todorov

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2000
Messages
3,621
As they have already released a version on cd
Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording) [Clean],
I fear this is what will happen on Disney +.
A quote from Miranda "I think we’ll figure it out when we get there, but we’re not going to cut any sections of the show. If we have to mute a word here or there to reach the largest audience possible, I’m OK with that, because your kids already have the original language memorized. I don’t think we’re depriving anyone of anything if we mute an f-bomb here or there to make our rating"
But that doesn’t sound like a Disney+ related comment — ”ratings” have to do with theatrical releases, and yes, it is possible to get a NC 17 rating strictly for language.
 

Ted Todorov

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2000
Messages
3,621
Movies leaving "The Criterion Channel" on May 31st.

We saw Bob & Carol &Ted & Alice last night. Definitely a film of its era, but worth seeing
 

Cranston37+

🇺🇸
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Messages
3,038
Real Name
Patrick
Do we actually know HAMILTON will be cleaned up for Disney+?

I have been asking that question for weeks and I can't seem to get a definitive answer.
As they have already released a version on cd
Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording) [Clean],
I fear this is what will happen on Disney +.
A quote from Miranda "I think we’ll figure it out when we get there, but we’re not going to cut any sections of the show. If we have to mute a word here or there to reach the largest audience possible, I’m OK with that, because your kids already have the original language memorized. I don’t think we’re depriving anyone of anything if we mute an f-bomb here or there to make our rating"
But that doesn’t sound like a Disney+ related comment — ”ratings” have to do with theatrical releases, and yes, it is possible to get a NC 17 rating strictly for language.

While they will probably mute any f-bombs for Disney+ it certainly looks like it was shot with them...

B5E75F30-12F1-4CB0-BE59-16F964478432.jpeg
 
Last edited:

John Gilmore

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Mar 31, 1999
Messages
105
Location
Oakland, CA.
Real Name
John Gilmore
I noticed that the Criterion Channel is streaming West Side Story this month. This couldn't by chance be a new transfer as opposed to the one with the botched overture, could it?
 

Garysb

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2003
Messages
4,332

Criterion said that it will make free films by Julie Dash, William Greaves, Kathleen Collins, Charles Burnett, Khalik Allah, and Maya Angelou, among others. The company said in a statement sent to Gizmodo on Thursday that it has removed the paywall from “as many of these titles as we can,” adding that it hopes viewers “will join us in speaking out and making a meaningful commitment to battling systemic racism in our country.”
 

Garysb

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2003
Messages
4,332
July Calendar


CHANNEL CALENDARS
The Criterion Channel’s July 2020 Lineup
INSIDE CRITERION / ON THE CHANNEL — JUN 29, 2020

iSlVQ8A5Y8kXLxmDtnkg3oY8d5NzA5.jpg

This July, the Criterion Channel celebrates unconventional artists who march to the beat of their own drum, with spotlights on indie iconoclast Miranda July, cutting-edge composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, downtown poet Sara Driver, lyrical documentarians Bill and Turner Ross, and formally adventurous dramatist Atom Egoyan. Sports fans sad to be missing this year’s Olympic Games can relive 100 years of Olympic history through the eyes of filmmakers like Kon Ichikawa, Carlos Saura, and Miloš Forman. There’s also bracingly radical films from Med Hondo and Lizzie Borden, a trio of Jane Fonda vehicles, the exclusive streaming premiere of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s Young Ahmed, and a gold mine of Hollywood treasure from an era when film noir met the western.
Now check out the full calendar!​
If you haven’t signed up yet, head to CriterionChannel.com and get a 14-day free trial.
* indicates programming available August 1
** indicates programming available September 1
*** indicates programming available only in the U.S.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1
hLEQzU6tnVoEegD2y049532tHrYfBh.jpg

Between the Lines
Featuring a 1983 documentary portrait of director Joan Micklin Silver by filmmaker Katja Raganelli
Inspired by director Joan Micklin Silver’s time working at New York’s the Village Voice, this unsung gem of 1970s slice-of-life seriocomedy—starring Lindsay Crouse and a young Jeff Goldblum, among others—offers an incisive, bittersweet look at a shifting media landscape that feels as fresh and relevant as ever.
Certain Women (Kelly Reichardt, 2016)
Criterion Collection Edition #893


THURSDAY, JULY 2
toQ7zZdYD2hlOeq5klY8hpIMPVVt2p.jpg

Young Ahmed***
Exclusive streaming premiere, featuring a new introduction by film historian Godfrey Cheshire
Winner of the best director award at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, the latest social-realist triumph from Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne finds the pair applying their patented brand of heartrendingly empathetic humanism to the story of a thirteen-year-old Muslim boy growing up in a small Belgian town who, under the sway of his radical imam, becomes increasingly enamored with the tenets of violent religious extremism.


FRIDAY, JULY 3
2zmOXjHectw2I9Wfzkz9dj63dnoTbU.jpg

Double Feature: Auto Focused
Bullitt and Grand Prix
Put the pedal to the metal for two adrenaline-rush classics that celebrate the pure, kinetic thrill of cool cars in motion.


SATURDAY, JULY 4
Saturday Matinee: Mad Hot Ballroom
Fifth graders from across New York City’s public schools journey into the life-changing world of ballroom dancing in this irresistible documentary from Marilyn Agrelo.


SUNDAY, JULY 5
Wv6wGgtGkuGx7lxZ95bTlJpOd8l4ZY.jpg

Western Noir
Featuring a new introduction by critic Imogen Sara Smith
A new breed of westerns emerged after World War II, stained by film noir’s anxious, disenchanted mood and enriched by its psychological and moral complexity. Romantic myths of the frontier gave way to tougher tales of ruthless outlaws, corrupt cattle barons, gold-crazed prospectors, mercenary gunfighters, and lonely, damaged men obsessively pursuing vengeance for past wrongs. From brooding black-and-white dramas like Station West and I Shot Jesse James to the harrowing, elegiac masterpieces of Anthony Mann, the West’s wide-open spaces prove as haunted and dangerous as any dark city.
Featuring: Blood on the Moon (Robert Wise, 1948), Station West (Sidney Lanfield, 1948), I Shot Jesse James (Samuel Fuller, 1949), Lust for Gold (S. Sylvan Simon, 1949), The Walking Hills (John Sturges, 1949), Devil’s Doorway (Anthony Mann, 1950)*, Rancho Notorious (Fritz Lang, 1952), The Naked Spur (Anthony Mann, 1953), Man with the Gun (Richard Wilson, 1955), The Violent Men (Rudolph Maté, 1955), Man of the West (Anthony Mann, 1958), Day of the Outlaw (André De Toth, 1959)


MONDAY, JULY 6
cMJtVW5xMeS1U3AF570Ial9HmLLNtX.jpg

Lenny Cooke
Featuring an introduction by Josh and Benny Safdie
In 2001, Lenny Cooke was the most hyped high school basketball player in the country, ranked above future greats LeBron James, Amar’e Stoudemire, and Carmelo Anthony. A decade later, he had never played a minute in the NBA. This quintessentially American documentary by Josh and Benny Safdie tracks the unfulfilled destiny of a man for whom superstardom was only just out of reach.
California Typewriter
A love letter to the analogue pleasures of an increasingly niche technology, this thought-provoking documentary is a rich, affectionate portrait of artists, writers, and collectors who remain steadfastly loyal to the typewriter as a tool and muse.


TUESDAY, JULY 7
1RJXpAf4nELq7c4O4dWCmJQGf5HZV9.jpg

Documentaries by the Ross Brothers
The richly impressionistic documentaries of Bill Ross IV and Turner Ross are wonders of regional American filmmaking that transform everyday life into free-flowing poetry. The brothers offer an exhilarating look at a single night in New Orleans in Tchoupitoulas and team up with David Byrne to stage a one-of-a-kind performance built around high school color guards in Contemporary Color.
Featuring: Tchoupitoulas (2012), Contemporary Color (2016)
Short + Feature: Animal Instincts
Shadow Animals and Attenberg
Two brilliantly bizarre anthropological dramas tap into the innate strangeness of human social rituals.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 8
5PY7ZE3YVgEcUIKZFr9YEe1C3y6hyl.jpg

Directed by Sara Driver
Featuring an introduction by Driver
Everyday reality slips into surrealist reverie in the uncanny visions of Sara Driver, whose films possess the hallucinatory textures and hypnotic rhythms of a waking dream. A central but often overlooked linchpin of the 1980s downtown New York arts scene, Driver made her directorial debut with the mesmerizingly eerie You Are Not I, and in subsequent features delved further into the fantastical, crafting modern-day fairy tales whose trancelike spells linger long after the last reel.
Featuring: You Are Not I (1981), Sleepwalk (1986), When Pigs Fly (1993), The Bowery (1994)
A Dry White Season (Euzhan Palcy, 1989)
Criterion Collection Edition #953


THURSDAY, JULY 9
vjMW3ymmjLRfk7lfemptLL9zzpO2ZE.jpg

Scores by Ryuichi Sakamoto
Featuring Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda, a 2017 documentary by Stephen Nomura Schible
Japanese electronic-music pioneer Ryuichi Sakamoto has been at the cutting edge of both pop and avant-garde music for over four decades. Opening up a brave new world of sound through his work with his influential band Yellow Magic Orchestra, Sakamoto went on to a distinguished international career as a film composer beginning with his entrancing synth score for Nagisa Oshima’s Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence. Since then, Sakamoto has worked with auteurs ranging from Bernardo Bertolucci to Pedro Almodóvar to Shirin Neshat, bringing a distinctive experimental edge and stirring sense of atmosphere to some of the most haunting and indelible film music of the last half century.
Featuring: Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (Nagisa Oshima, 1983), The Sheltering Sky (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1990), The Handmaid’s Tale (Volker Schlöndorff, 1990), High Heels (Pedro Almodóvar, 1991), Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (Peter Kosminsky, 1992)**, Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (John Maybury, 1998)***, Gohatto (Nagisa Oshima, 1999), Tony Takitani (Jun Ichikawa, 2004), Women Without Men (Shirin Neshat and Shoja Azari, 2009), Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda (Stephen Nomura Schible, 2017)


FRIDAY, JULY 10
Double Feature: Loving on the Edge
Mala Noche and My Own Private Idaho
Touchstone works in the evolution of the New Queer Cinema movement, these twin tales of aimless youth by Gus Van Sant are intoxicating anthems of outsiderhood.


SATURDAY, JULY 11
dwyvdiR3ikU79qvpjOnPvLJXbZygNI.jpg

Saturday Matinee: The White Balloon
Cowritten with his mentor Abbas Kiarostami, Jafar Panahi’s revelatory debut feature is a child’s-eye adventure in which a young girl’s quest to buy a goldfish leads her on a detour-filled journey through the streets of Tehran on the eve of the Iranian New Year celebration.


SUNDAY, JULY 12
jzwCtoH3DE18WyuqscoJCgiqgxOVWg.jpg

Marriage Stories
Bad marriages make great movies, as evidenced by these gloriously messy, cuttingly perceptive portraits of some of the most dysfunctional relationships ever captured on-screen. These films also happen to be vehicles for some of the most personal and revealing statements from major directors like Ingmar Bergman, John Cassavetes, Ida Lupino, Mike Nichols, Noah Baumbach, Lars von Trier, Asghar Farhadi, and others, each of whom brings fresh insight to that most universal of subjects: the mysterious intricacies of human intimacy.
Featuring: Come Back, Little Sheba (Daniel Mann, 1952), The Bigamist (Ida Lupino, 1953), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (Richard Brooks, 1958), La notte (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1961), Juliet of the Spirits (Federico Fellini, 1965), Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Mike Nichols, 1966), Faces (John Cassavetes, 1968), A Married Couple (Allan King, 1969), Scenes from a Marriage (Ingmar Bergman, 1973), California Suite (Herbert Ross, 1978), Kramer vs. Kramer (Robert Benton, 1979), 5x2 (François Ozon, 2004), The Squid and the Whale (Noah Baumbach, 2005)***, Antichrist (Lars von Trier, 2009), Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010), Tuesday, After Christmas (Radu Muntean, 2010), A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011), 45 Years (Andrew Haigh, 2015)


MONDAY, JULY 13
pCZ8VgykXj9OIujCtq6Npb8xOjxT7O.jpg

Nostalgia for the Light
Master documentarian Patricio Guzmán travels ten thousand feet above sea level to the driest place on earth: Chile’s Atacama Desert, where astronomers search for distant galaxies and surviving relatives of the disappeared search for the remains of their loved ones in a quest to reclaim their families’ histories.


TUESDAY, JULY 14
1n7i9DEtl2sQuUCIxNTf8sbfJsJmvJ.jpg

Short + Feature: Lost Pets
Pickle and Gates of Heaven
Featuring an introduction by Criterion Channel programmer Penelope Bartlett
Do all dogs go to heaven? Two documentary filmmakers explore mortality and mourning through the experiences of pet owners.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 15
UZYADXaBpqxWLNaBYCSQhabzj7Y3ig.jpg

Directed by Miranda July
Featuring the 2019 documentary Miranda July: Where It Began
The fearless, brilliantly idiosyncratic films of writer-director-actor and all-around polymath Miranda July combine arrestingly oddball whimsy with astute, emotionally penetrating observations on intimacy, sexuality, loneliness, and human connection. Beginning her career as a performance artist immersed in the riot grrrl scene of 1990s Portland, Oregon, July found her way to film with her pioneering Joanie 4 Jackie project, in which she curated and distributed feminist video “chain letters” of underground movies made by women across the country. With her acclaimed features Me and You and Everyone We Know and The Future, July established herself as one of American independent cinema’s most distinctive voices, a bold, relentlessly imaginative artist who finds cosmic insight in the everyday.
Features: Me and You and Everyone We Know (Miranda July, 2005), The Future (Miranda July, 2011)
Shorts: The Amateurist (Miranda July, 1998), Nest of Tens (Miranda July, 2000)
Shorts from Joanie 4 Jackie: Transeltown (Myra Paci, 1992), Dear Mom (Tammy Rae Carland, 1995), The Slow Escape (Sativa Peterson, 1998), Hawai (Ximena Cuevas, 1999), No Place Like Home #1 and #2 (Karen Yasinsky, 1999), Gigi (from 9 to 5) (Joanne Nucho, 2001), Ophelia’s Opera (Abiola Abrams, 2001), La Llorona (Stephanie Saint Sanchez, 2003), untitled video (Sujin Lee, 2002), Joanie 4 Jackie: A Quick Overview (Shauna McGarry, 2008)


THURSDAY, JULY 16
kUhHKWqVijnLWIE14B6yzAFihcsyDV.jpg

Three Starring Jane Fonda
Few actors have dominated an era—for their work both on- and offscreen—the way Jane Fonda did in the 1960s and ’70s, when she emerged as one of the most acclaimed performers of her generation as well as a zeitgeist-defining cultural icon for her fierce political activism. All made at the peak of her career, these three films showcase Fonda’s nuance, impeccable comic timing, and versatility.
Featuring: Barbarella (Roger Vadim, 1968), Fun with Dick and Jane (Ted Kotcheff, 1977), California Suite (Herbert Ross, 1978)


FRIDAY, JULY 17
Double Feature: Girls and the Gang
Mona Lisa and Gloria
Featuring an audio commentary for Mona Lisa by director Neil Jordan and actor Bob Hoskins
Two women tangle with the mob in a pair of gritty crime dramas with unexpectedly tender hearts.


SATURDAY, JULY 18
Saturday Matinee: Miss Annie Rooney
Shirley Temple grows up in a charming, bobby-soxing teenage romance.


SUNDAY, JULY 19
ag431Fk9BMfi7D5bNXco4nMRMY4e8c.jpg

100 Years of Olympic Films: 1912–2012
Spanning fifty-three movies and forty-one editions of the Olympic Games, 100 Years of Olympic Films: 1912–2012 is the culmination of a massive, award-winning archival project encompassing dozens of restorations by the International Olympic Committee. The documentaries collected here cast a cinematic eye on some of the most iconic moments in the history of modern sports, spotlighting athletes who embody the Olympic motto of “Faster, Higher, Stronger”: Jesse Owens shattering world records on the track in 1936 Berlin, Jean-Claude Killy dominating the Grenoble slopes in 1968, Joan Benoit breaking away to win the Games’ first women’s marathon in Los Angeles in 1984. It also offers a fascinating glimpse of the development of film itself, and of the technological progress that has brought viewers ever closer to the action. Traversing continents and decades, reflecting the social, cultural, and political changes that have shaped our recent history, this remarkable movie marathon showcases a hundred years of human endeavor.
Featuring: The Games of the V Olympiad Stockholm, 1912 (Adrian Wood, 2016), The Olympic Games Held at Chamonix in 1924 (Jean de Rovera, 1924), The Olympic Games as They Were Practiced in Ancient Greece (Jean de Rovera, 1924), The Olympic Games in Paris 1924 (Jean de Rovera, 1924), The White Stadium (Arnold Fanck and Othmar Gurtner, 1928), The IX Olympiad in Amsterdam (dir. unknown, 1928), The Olympic Games, Amsterdam 1928 (Wilhelm Prager, 1928), Youth of the World (Carl Junghans, 1936), Olympia Part One: Festival of the Nations (Leni Riefenstahl, 1938), Olympia Part Two: Festival of Beauty (Leni Riefenstahl, 1938), Fight Without Hate (André Michel, 1948), XIVth Olympiad: The Glory of Sport (Castleton Knight, 1948), The VI Olympic Winter Games, Oslo 1952 (Tancred Ibsen, 1952), Where the World Meets (Hannu Leminen, 1952), Gold and Glory (Hannu Leminen, 1953), Memories of the Olympic Summer of 1952 (dir. unknown, 1954), White Vertigo (Giorgio Ferroni, 1956), Olympic Games, 1956 (Peter Whitchurch, 1956), The Melbourne Rendez-vous (René Lucot, 1957), Alain Mimoun (Louis Gueguen, 1959), The Horse in Focus (dir. unknown, 1956), People, Hopes, Medals (Heribert Meisel, 1960), The Grand Olympics (Romolo Marcellini, 1961), IX Olympic Winter Games, Innsbruck 1964 (Theo Hörmann, 1964), Tokyo Olympiad (Kon Ichikawa, 1965), Sensation of the Century (prod. Taguchi Suketaro, 1966), 13 Days in France (Claude Lelouch and François Reichenbach, 1968), Snows of Grenoble (Jacques Ertaud and Jean-Jacques Languepin, 1968), The Olympics in Mexico (Alberto Isaac, 1969), Sapporo Winter Olympics (Masahiro Shinoda, 1972), Visions of Eight (Miloš Forman, Kon Ichikawa, Claude Lelouch, Yuri Ozerov, Arthur Penn, Michael Pfleghar, John Schlesinger, and Mai Zetterling, 1973), White Rock (Tony Maylam, 1977), Games of the XXI Olympiad (Jean-Claude Labrecque, Jean Beaudin, Marcel Carrière, and Georges Dufaux, 1977), Olympic Spirit (Drummond Challis and Tony Maylam, 1980), O Sport, You Are Peace! (Yuri Ozerov, 1981), A Turning Point (Kim Takal, 1984), 16 Days of Glory (Bud Greenspan, 1986), Calgary ’88: 16 Days of Glory (Bud Greenspan, 1989), Seoul 1988 (Lee Kwang-soo, 1989), Hand in Hand (Im Kwon-taek, 1989), Beyond All Barriers (Lee Ji-won, 1989), One Light, One World (Joe Jay Jalbert and R. Douglas Copsey, 1992), Marathon (Carlos Saura, 1993), Lillehammer ’94: 16 Days of Glory (Bud Greenspan, 1994), Atlanta’s Olympic Glory (Bud Greenspan, 1997), Nagano ’98 Olympics: Stories of Honor and Glory (Bud Greenspan, 1998), Olympic Glory (Kieth Merrill, 1999), Sydney 2000: Stories of Olympic Glory (Bud Greenspan, 2001), Salt Lake City 2002: Bud Greenspan’s Stories of Olympic Glory (Bud Greenspan, 2003), Bud Greenspan’s Athens 2004: Stories of Olympic Glory (Bud Greenspan, 2005), Bud Greenspan’s Torino 2006: Stories of Olympic Glory (Bud Greenspan, 2007), The Everlasting Flame (Gu Jun, 2010), Bud Greenspan Presents Vancouver 2010: Stories of Olympic Glory (prods. Bud Greenspan and Nancy Beffa, 2010), First (Caroline Rowland, 2012)


MONDAY, JULY 20
HIS8P1ZWTnX3X9ogMLSIICoEP01vzl.jpg

12 O’Clock Boys
Three years in the making, Lotfy Nathan’s wild, dynamic documentary captures the death-defying antics of an infamous Baltimore dirt-bike pack through the eyes of young adolescent Pug, a bright kid from the Westside obsessed with the riders and willing to do anything to join their ranks.


TUESDAY, JULY 21
0mRoTJ07cJDHOS8vd8SviLMuyBIbxD.jpg

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project: Soleil Ô
Exclusive streaming premiere, featuring an interview with director Med Hondo
A furious howl of resistance against racist oppression, the debut from Mauritanian director Med Hondo is a bitterly funny, stylistically explosive attack on Western capitalism and the legacy of colonialism.
Short + Feature: A Day in the Life
Fit Model and Cléo from 5 to 7
Featuring a new conversation between Fit Model director Myna Joseph and actor Lucy Owen
Agnès Varda’s French New Wave touchstone inspires a journey through the modern-day gig economy of New York City.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 22
aFhvwEr3DfBNVilDhFHML1QpfpFV4j.jpg

Born in Flames
Featuring a new introduction by director Lizzie Borden
The film that rocked the foundations of the 1980s underground, this postpunk provocation is a DIY science-fiction fantasia of female rebellion set in America ten years after a social-democratic cultural revolution.


THURSDAY, JULY 23
A7s4L9p5XP7VhmLiAD0nSDbknt3eFN.jpg

Tokyo Olympiad (Kon Ichikawa, 1965)
Criterion Collection Edition #155


FRIDAY, JULY 24
Double Feature: The Hardboiled Way
Gun Crazy and The Big Combo
B movie master Joseph H. Lewis turns the ingredients of dime store pulp into existentialist poetry in two essential noir masterpieces.


SATURDAY, JULY 25
uGVdMitVprDOLvmz8OWf8K1J5nLk3N.jpg

Saturday Matinee: Destroy All Monsters
Eleven iconic beasts romp and stomp their way through this classic kaiju extravaganza from the original Godzilla team.


SUNDAY, JULY 26
hasLIGsCzZDRgYin6AJ4RJFlvSSzvO.jpg

Directed by Atom Egoyan
Featuring a new introduction by Egoyan
The formally adventurous and psychologically intricate films of renowned Canadian auteur Atom Egoyan unfold according to complex, time-scrambling structures that heighten their searing emotional impact. Exploring issues of identity (including his own Armenian heritage), loss, alienation, and technology, Egoyan’s films frequently revolve around people struggling to make sense of their own shattered sense of self in the wake of profound personal tragedies. His provocative themes and elliptical style are on display in early critical triumphs like Next of Kin and Calendar and reach new heights of virtuosity in his masterpieces Exotica and The Sweet Hereafter, both of which are widely considered among the greatest Canadian films ever made.
Featuring: Next of Kin (1984)***, Family Viewing (1987)***, Speaking Parts (1989)***, The Adjuster (1991), Calendar (1993), Exotica (1994), The Sweet Hereafter (1997), Adoration (2008)***


MONDAY, JULY 27
Lvivanh25octWSgMAwKeuErT87WlOr.jpg

Infinite Football
Romanian New Wave leader Corneliu Porumboiu directs this marvelously offbeat, continually surprising documentary about an ordinary man’s extraordinary sports ambitions.


TUESDAY, JULY 28
s1kjTKMtq2A483dnEWtqm6OH9cKKRk.jpg

Short + Feature: Age of Exploration
Pillars and Girlhood
Featuring a new introduction by Pillars director Haley Elizabeth Anderson
Two richly immersive coming of age snapshots capture the ecstatic highs and brutal lows of female adolescence.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29
My Twentieth Century
Among the greatest of cinematic debuts, Hungarian trailblazer Ildikó Enyedi’s award-winning first feature is a luminous, unconventional fairy tale.


THURSDAY, JULY 30
ru0k2CVv5tiuzarnaLklhQksRysRMj.jpg

The Loft Cinema Presents: Arizona Dream
Serbian visionary Emir Kusturica gate-crashed Hollywood with this singular, marvelously loopy surrealist comedy featuring a remarkable cast that includes Johnny Depp, Faye Dunaway, Jerry Lewis, Lili Taylor, and Vincent Gallo.


FRIDAY, JULY 31
M7ko1r6lVqHYfZ6eA51a8cpgx2WSF8.jpg

Double Feature: From Art House to Grindhouse
The Virgin Spring and The Last House on the Left
Ingmar Bergman’s Oscar-winning tale of savagery in medieval Sweden inspires a notorious Wes Craven shocker.
 

Cranston37+

🇺🇸
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Messages
3,038
Real Name
Patrick
I've been watching the hell out of the "Western Noir" series.

And that is why I love the Criterion Channel. It's not just a collection of movies. But as a film fan, it focuses me on something specific and teaches me about it, broadening my knowledge of the art form.

As a film noir fan, I never considered western noir might be a thing. So first I get a lengthy introduction to what it is by Imogen Sara Smith, then 11 great examples of it, including "Blood on the Moon" which was just released by Warner Archive.

I will always consider $99/yr to be a bargain for this service... even though I actually paid $85 ;)
 

dpippel

Yoyodyne Propulsion Systems
Premium
Joined
Feb 24, 2000
Messages
10,511
Location
Sonora Norte
Real Name
Doug
I've been watching the hell out of the "Western Noir" series.

And that is why I love the Criterion Channel. It's not just a collection of movies. But as a film fan, it focuses me on something specific and teaches me about it, broadening my knowledge of the art form.

As a film noir fan, I never considered western noir might be a thing. So first I get a lengthy introduction to what it is by Imogen Sara Smith, then 11 great examples of it, including "Blood on the Moon" which was just released by Warner Archive.

I will always consider $99/yr to be a bargain for this service... even though I actually paid $85 ;)

I agree on all counts. Just started watching the Western Noir titles today myself, kicking it off with The Walking Hills because, well, Ella Raines, Randolph Scott, and Death Valley before it became a National Park (it was a National Monument at the time of filming).
 

ManW_TheUncool

His Own Fool
Premium
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2001
Messages
8,409
Location
The BK
Real Name
ManW
I will always consider $99/yr to be a bargain for this service... even though I actually paid $85 ;)

Plus they've been giving out $10 coupons (2x so far) to shop at their store. And now that B&N seems to have killed membership discount *and* all coupon uses for their Criterion sales, those Criterion store coupons become that much more useful...

_Man_
 

Robert Crawford

Crawdaddy
Moderator
Patron
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
56,767
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert
I agree on all counts. Just started watching the Western Noir titles today myself, kicking it off with The Walking Hills because, well, Ella Raines, Randolph Scott, and Death Valley before it became a National Park (it was a National Monument at the time of filming).
Over the past year, I've watched four of those titles and talked about them a little in my thread. Today, I watched my fifth of those eleven titles.
 

Ted Todorov

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2000
Messages
3,621
July is another banner month for the Criterion Channel. Too many gems to cover all of them, but for thos who have never seen any of Atom Egoyan movies, check them out. Maybe “The Adjuster” is a great example.

Plenty of goofy classics as well, like “Barbarella”. I’ll have to look into the Western Noir
 

Garysb

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2003
Messages
4,332
August Calendar


The Criterion Channel’s August 2020 Lineup
INSIDE CRITERION / ON THE CHANNEL — JUL 30, 2020

MoNTjkqGtmmtoh35fTrbSf1wf4wXUD.jpg

Stuck at home this summer? Don’t let that get you down—our Bad Vacations series makes the case for staying in and watching movies, cataloguing an array of holiday horrors ranging from existential ennui to full-throttle terror. That’s just the tip of the (melting) iceberg this month on the Channel: there’s also spotlights on independent visionary Bill Gunn, French-cinema luminary Mia Hansen-Løve, and underground-animation hero Bill Plympton, as well as a sweeping survey of the Australian New Wave. Beyond that, we’ve got the exclusive streaming premiere of the acclaimed Bacurau, Humberto Solás’s Cuban landmark Lucía, a trio of noirs by Robert Siodmak, Joseph Losey’s rediscovered existential mystery Mr. Klein, Amy Seimetz’s revelatory Sun Don’t Shine, and so much more.
Now check out the full calendar!
If you haven’t signed up yet, head to CriterionChannel.com and get a 14-day free trial.
** indicates programming available only in the U.S.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1
7xYl6rCD1wqrha3jxOYuB1yMom4avs.jpg

Saturday Matinee: The Little Prince
Stanley Donen directs a touchingly sincere musical adaptation of the beloved philosophical fable.
Sullivan’s Travels (Preston Sturges, 1941)
Criterion Collection Edition #118


SUNDAY, AUGUST 2
0htmsm31fewicleSyiwdBdZpp4QlDT.jpg

Australian New Wave
Featuring Voices from the Australian New Wave, a short documentary including interviews with Gillian Armstrong, Bruce Beresford, David Gulpilil, Peter Weir, and others
From the early seventies through the mideighties, a resurgence of government funding for national film production gave birth to a generation of brave, unconventional new voices who made Australia the home to a brief but bright-burning cinematic renaissance. Among the filmmakers who emerged from this artistic flowering were pivotal figures like Peter Weir, George Miller, Gillian Armstrong, Bruce Beresford, Fred Schepisi, and Phillip Noyce, many of whom went on to successful international careers. Encompassing subversive visions of Australian history, dystopian science-fiction cult classics, groundbreaking coming-of-age dramas, and beyond, these formally bold, thematically provocative films delved into the intricacies of Australian society and identity with newfound fearlessness.
Featuring: Walkabout (Nicolas Roeg, 1971), The Cars That Ate Paris (Peter Weir, 1974), Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975), Sunday Too Far Away (Ken Hannam, 1975), The Devil’s Playground (Fred Schepisi, 1976), Don’s Party (Bruce Beresford, 1976), Storm Boy (Henri Safran, 1976), The Getting of Wisdom (Bruce Beresford, 1977), The Last Wave (Peter Weir, 1977), The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (Fred Schepisi, 1978), Long Weekend (Colin Eggleston, 1978), Money Movers (Bruce Beresford, 1978), Newsfront (Phillip Noyce, 1978), Mad Max (George Miller, 1979), My Brilliant Career (Gillian Armstrong, 1979), The Plumber (Peter Weir, 1979), Breaker Morant (Bruce Beresford, 1980), Gallipoli (Peter Weir, 1981), Puberty Blues (Bruce Beresford, 1981), Starstruck (Gillian Armstrong, 1982), The Year of Living Dangerously (Peter Weir, 1982)


MONDAY, AUGUST 3
pVo9LJe4361UYQtlL1tpEqNaAVyrQK.jpg

Four Documentaries by Ron Mann
Featuring a new introduction by Mann
Essential records of North America’s pop-culture underground, the documentaries of Ron Mann are deep dives into some of the most vital and often overlooked artistic movements of the twentieth century. Finding offbeat inspiration in the creativity that flourishes outside the mainstream, he has chronicled everything from free jazz to modern poetry to comic books, along the way capturing invaluable interviews with cult luminaries like musicians Cecil Taylor and Archie Shepp, writers William S. Burroughs and Charles Bukowski, and cartoonists Jack Kirby and Robert Crumb.
Featuring: Imagine the Sound (1981), Poetry in Motion (1982), Poetry in Motion (1982), Twist (1992)


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4
Short + Feature: High-Flying Heroes
Mynarski Death Plummet and Only Angels Have Wings
Take flight with two white-knuckle tales of courage in the sky.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5
f1M9vobfmwiRtQFodqQgkWeHppCt71.jpg

Rafiki
Bursting with the colorful street style and music of Nairobi’s vibrant youth culture, Rafiki is a tender love story between two young women in a country that still criminalizes homosexuality. Initially banned in Kenya for its positive portrayal of queer romance, Wanuri Kahiu’s film made history by winning a landmark supreme court case chipping away at Kenyan anti-LGBTQ legislation.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 6
uHRCe9j9g9LEfHq9V6pPscSVuz8vDp.jpg

World Cinema Project: Lucía
Featuring Humberto & Lucía, a new documentary about the making of the film
A breathtaking vision of Cuban revolutionary history wrought with white-hot intensity by Humberto Solás, this operatic epic tells the story of a changing country through the eyes of three women, each named Lucía.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 7
FRQU5t3XFhu7MTiEmmwTGbOvvdMkx2.jpg

Double Feature: The Decline of Midwestern Civilization
The Magnificent Ambersons and Kings Row
Two prestigious 1942 literary adaptations trace stories of small town tragedy—one with majestic poignancy, the other with shocking perversity.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 8
Saturday Matinee: Storm Boy
In this deeply affecting classic of the Australian New Wave, a lonely young white boy experiences an emotional awakening through his growing bonds with an orphaned pelican and an Aboriginal man estranged from his tribe.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 9
WJ07DzvnwXaDMrGTjesbP2RjmZ6eRH.jpg

Starring Alain Delon
The beautiful boy of French cinema whose steely, ice-blue gaze betrayed more than a hint of danger, Alain Delon was a favorite of modernists like Luchino Visconti, Jean-Pierre Melville, and Michelangelo Antonioni, all of whom were seduced by his impossible good looks and air of cool detachment. This selection of many of Delon’s finest moments spotlights his wide-ranging, star-making performances.
Featuring: Purple Noon (René Clément, 1960), Rocco and His Brothers (Luchino Visconti, 1960), L’eclisse (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1962), Any Number Can Win (Henri Verneuil, 1963), Once a Thief (Ralph Nelson, 1965), Le samouraï (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1967), The Girl on a Motorcycle (Jack Cardiff, 1968), Spirits of the Dead (Federico Fellini, Louis Malle, and Roger Vadim, 1968), Le cercle rouge (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1970), The Widow Couderc (Pierre Granier-Deferre, 1971), Un flic (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1972), Mr. Klein (Joseph Losey, 1976)


MONDAY, AUGUST 10
Festival (Murray Lerner, 1967)
Criterion Collection Edition #892


TUESDAY, AUGUST 11
batNasBRO0FiKJyT6eN5qUrw26klZ6.jpg

Short + Feature: Hands of Fate
Cutaway and L’argent
Radical minimalism is wielded with extraordinary power in two shattering stories conveyed largely through a focus on hands.
Brazil (Terry Gilliam, 1985)
Criterion Collection Edition #51


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12
weM0bLfgBEhYonF1OP6Bbqa0QvOeYC.jpg

Three by Mia Hansen-Løve
Featuring a new introduction by Hansen-Løve
Contemporary French cinema’s heir to the delicately naturalistic, profoundly humanist sensibility of Éric Rohmer, Mia Hansen-Løve mines the raw materials of her own life and family story to create gracefully empathetic explorations of people in states of emotional flux, finding rich philosophical insight in the moments that test us the most.
Featuring: Father of My Children (2009), Goodbye First Love (2011), Things to Come (2016)


THURSDAY, AUGUST 13
Dd0CXlaD5wiWVIsttinFErGWs65nGr.jpg

Three by Bill Gunn
Featuring a 1984 interview with Gunn
One of the most electrifying but unjustly neglected talents to emerge from the creative ferment of 1970s American cinema, actor, writer, and director Bill Gunn blazed a new trail for Black independent filmmakers with his avant-visionary, Afrocentric vampire myth Ganja & Hess and Personal Problems, an epic, intensely intimate “meta-soap opera” (as writer Ishmael Reed called it) that went virtually unseen for decades before reemerging to widespread acclaim. Those twin masterpieces are presented alongside Ján Kadár’s The Angel Levine, an overlooked Bernard Malamud adaptation cowritten by Gunn and starring Zero Mostel and Harry Belafonte. With their bold, iconoclastic style and focus on the lives of intellectual and middle-class Black characters, Gunn’s uncompromising films were decades ahead of their time—only now is the world beginning to catch up.
Featuring: The Angel Levine (Ján Kadár, 1970), Ganja & Hess (Bill Gunn, 1973), Personal Problems (Bill Gunn, 1980)


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14
Double Feature: Behind the Screens
Hollywood Shuffle and The Player
Two maverick filmmakers with uneasy relationships to Hollywood offer hilarious and scathing satires of the film industry.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 15
Saturday Matinee: The Secret Garden
Two of golden-age Hollywood’s greatest and most beloved child stars bring the classic novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett to enchanting life.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 16
q7tdNwj34NIyxASr2YLGInez82vlUT.jpg

Directed by Wim Wenders
Turning seventy-five this August, Wim Wenders is cinema’s preeminent poet of the open road, soulfully tracing the journeys of wanderers and drifters searching for themselves. Over the course of his incredible five-decade career, Wenders has traversed the landscapes of his native Germany, the highways of the American Southwest, and the dream worlds of angels, working with master cinematographers like Robby Müller and Henri Alekan to create some of the most indelible images in all of modern cinema. Moving restlessly between exquisite narrative works and innovative documentaries, Wenders remains a vital and prolific creative force, following his inspiration across the world wherever it may lead.
Features: Alice in the Cities (1974), Wrong Move (1975), Kings of the Road (1976), The American Friend (1977), Paris, Texas (1984), Tokyo-ga (1985), Wings of Desire (1987), Until the End of the World (1991), Palermo Shooting (2008), Pina (2011)
Shorts: Same Player Shoots Again (1968)


MONDAY, AUGUST 17
EVsTD0yqBQANPPylMeMCdcuyZE6hYG.jpg

Documentaries by Les Blank
From garlic to gap-toothed women, no subject was too esoteric to capture the imagination of Les Blank, an uncompromisingly independent spirit who, for nearly fifty years, disappeared with his camera into subcultures rarely seen on-screen. Seemingly off-the-cuff yet poetically constructed, Blank’s films are humane, sometimes wry, always engaging tributes to music, food, and all sorts of regionally specific delights. Whether documenting the art of a legendary Texas bluesman, the richness of Cajun culture, or the quixotic exploits of his friend Werner Herzog, Blank had a boundless zest for life and people that shines through every frame of his affectionate, joy-filled work.
Features: A Poem is a Naked Person (1974), Burden of Dreams (1982)
Shorts: The Blues Accordin’ to Lightnin’ Hopkins (1968), God Respects Us When We Work, but Loves Us When We Dance (1968), Spend It All (1971), A Well Spent Life (1971), Dry Wood (1973), Hot Pepper (1973), Always for Pleasure (1978), Garlic Is as Good as Ten Mothers (1980), Sprout Wings and Fly (1983), In Heaven There Is No Beer? (1984), Gap-Toothed Women (1987), Yum, Yum, Yum! A Taste of Cajun and Creole Cooking (1990), The Maestro: King of the Cowboy Artists (1994), Sworn to the Drum: A Tribute to Francisco Aguabella (1995)


TUESDAY, AUGUST 18
Short + Feature: Landscapes of Loss
Voices of Kidnapping and Nostalgia for the Light
The enduring love of families for victims of political violence reaches across time and space in two haunting topographic meditations on grief and hope.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19
ldXsK97WayHuSQBy6zcY5KnoiNVs4m.jpg

Starstruck
For the follow-up to her acclaimed first feature, My Brilliant Career, Australian New Wave leader Gillian Armstrong made a gloriously over-the-top, shiny pop musical complete with outré costumes, high-energy dance numbers, and eye-popping production design courtesy of Brian Thomson (The Rocky Horror Picture Show).


THURSDAY, AUGUST 20
AnqCvX1GhXhpKIm5Z0SeeGgL5UjuKQ.jpg

Bacurau
Exclusive streaming premiere, featuring an interview with directors Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles
A blistering sci-fi thriller streaked with antiracist and anticolonialist rage, the new film from Aquarius director Kleber Mendonça Filho, codirected with Juliano Dornelles, is an audacious, furiously entertaining model of genre art as a vehicle for political resistance.
xyPjJdvXWixQVMgVlFpy2df4OYUCTK.jpg

Three by Robert Siodmak
Along with fellow European émigrés like Fritz Lang and Billy Wilder, German-born Robert Siodmak was instrumental in importing the expressionist visual style and hard-bitten existentialist sensibility that would define Hollywood film noir, arguably creating more classics of the genre than any other director. His moody, shadow-etched compositions and flair for the fatalistic are on full display in three of his finest: Phantom Lady, his dreamlike first noir and a fascinating protofeminist example of the genre; The Killers, a landmark known as the “Citizen Kane of noir” for its intricate flashback structure, starring Burt Lancaster in his film debut; and Criss Cross, which reunited the director with Lancaster for one of the twistiest and bleakest crime thrillers ever made.
Featuring: Phantom Lady (1944), The Killers (1946), Criss Cross (1949)


FRIDAY, AUGUST 21
Double Feature: Art of Darkness
The American Friend and Mr. Klein
Master directors Wim Wenders and Joseph Losey paint sinister portraits of moral corruption in a pair of spellbinding, coolly stylized tales of unscrupulous art dealers embroiled in dangerous underworlds.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 22
jMzdEjfUM0maLreXXzWal8lHSUuNdR.jpg

Saturday Matinee: The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T.
One of the most outrageous acts of cinematic surrealism ever to emanate from Hollywood’s dream factory, the only film written by Theodor Seuss Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss) is a riotous Technicolor fantasy in which a young boy dreams himself into an imaginary world ruled by a diabolical piano teacher who forces five hundred children to practice an enormous keyboard for eternity. Met with incomprehension upon its release, it has since taken its place as a beloved cult favorite, a one-of-a-kind children’s film that doubles as a triumph of genuine avant-garde imagination.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 23
kpJqZ19QBOCoKyKRkesgo17PYkTOLJ.jpg

Bad Vacations
Wishing you could get away this summer? This collection of some of cinema’s most memorably disastrous trips will have you reconsidering the comforts of home.
Featuring: Bonjour tristesse (Otto Preminger, 1958), La collectionneuse (Éric Rohmer, 1967), The Deep (Peter Yates, 1977), House (Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1977), Long Weekend (Colin Eggleston, 1978), The Green Ray (Eric Rohmer, 1986), The Comfort of Strangers (Paul Schrader, 1990), The Sheltering Sky (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1990), Funny Games (Michael Haneke, 1997), Fat Girl (Catherine Breillat, 2001), La Ciénaga (Lucrecia Martel, 2001), Unrelated (Joanna Hogg, 2007), Sightseers (Ben Wheatley, 2012)**


MONDAY, AUGUST 24
TBQTQLohCfrUSzFQfMJX8Jy5fKqXUG.jpg

John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection
Narrated by Mathieu Amalric, this innovative documentary revisits a wealth of 16 mm footage of tennis superstar John McEnroe taken at the height of his career, when he competed to defend his status as the world’s top-ranked player at the 1984 French Open. This portrait of sports prowess and passion expressively reshapes its material to explore both McEnroe’s game and the footage itself, creating a mesmerizing, immersive study of a driven athlete, the human body in motion, and cinema itself.


TUESDAY, AUGUST 25
Short + Feature: Poetry in Motion
The Lonedale Operator and And When I Die, I Won’t Stay Dead
The words and worlds of visionary poets John Ashbery and Bob Kaufman flicker to life in these richly cinematic odes to American genius.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26
qPh11HWWxT4buLb8mJ1k9UPfBVRuG3.jpg

Sun Don’t Shine
Featuring a new introduction by Seimetz and her short film When We Lived in Miami
Written and directed by Amy Seimetz, this tantalizingly enigmatic, sun-kissed noir follows Crystal (Kate Lyn Sheil) and her boyfriend Leo (Kentucker Audley) on a tense and mysterious road trip through the desolate yet hauntingly beautiful landscape of central Florida.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 27
0HIzilkJQLimbsfKLo8623hR3w6rqb.jpg

Three by Stephen Cone
Featuring a new interview with Cone
A self-taught filmmaker who has quietly garnered a reputation as one of American independent cinema’s most thoughtful and compassionate artists, Stephen Cone is a true actor’s director, working intimately with a cast of regulars to tell naturalistic, deeply human stories about coming of age, coming out, and the intricacies of modern-day religion. Triumphs of subtle, empathetic storytelling, Cone’s unjustly under-the-radar films exude an easy, understated grace even as they grapple with some of life’s most complex questions.
Featuring: The Wise Kids (2011), Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party (2015), Princess Cyd (2017)


FRIDAY, AUGUST 28
KzN9uWeHUukDiyHA6qjgGm0VVbGNxK.jpg

Double Feature: Private Eyes
Phantom Lady and Variety
The power of the female gaze subverts the genre and gender conventions of classical film noir in a dreamlike thriller and a feminist touchstone it inspired.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 29
Saturday Matinee: The Scarlet Pimpernel
Prestige producer Alexander Korda applies his seal of quality to this rip-roaring swashbuckler about a foppish aristocrat with a heroic secret identity.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 30
GqhgDguz1HFfE5p5rn1ABEwwLDWKK2.jpg

Films by Bill Plympton
“King of Indie Animation” Bill Plympton’s wonderfully weird creations are unmistakable: the wriggly, hand-sketched style, warped humor, and endlessly shape-shifting, transmogrifying images are the hallmarks of a singularly bizarre and brilliant imagination. Originally a newspaper cartoonist, Plympton found success as a film animator when his entrancingly twisted musical Your Face received an Oscar nomination for best animated short, leading to dozens more shorts and features, regular play on early 1990s MTV, another Oscar nomination (for the short Guard Dog), and a worldwide cult following. A self-described “blend of Magritte and R. Crumb,” Plympton is a one-of-a-kind auteur of the absurd, an underground animation hero whose films hold a funhouse mirror up to the innate strangeness of everyday reality.
Features: The Tune (1992), I Married a Strange Person! (1997), Mutant Aliens (2001), Hair High (2004), Idiots and Angels (2008), Cheatin’ (2013), Revengeance (2016)
Shorts: Your Face (1987), One of Those Days (1988), 25 Ways to Quit Smoking (1989), How to Kiss (1988), Push Comes to Shove (1991), The Wiseman (1991), How to Make Love to a Woman (1996), Sex and Violence (1997), Guard Dog (2004), The Fan and The Flower (2005), Guide Dog (2006), Hot Dog (2008), Santa, the Fascist Years (2008), Horn Dog (2009), The Cow Who Wanted to Be a Hamburger (2010)


MONDAY, AUGUST 31
re1eZ5gQhRVP9eMW0gtcKJiKzKphJO.jpg

Exporting Raymond
Featuring a new introduction by director Phil Rosenthal
Phil Rosenthal created one of the most iconic television families of all time with his hit sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. And then . . . the Russians called. In this genuine fish-out-of-water comedy that could only have happened in real life, Phil travels to Russia to help adapt his beloved show for Russian television. Exporting Raymond offers a hilarious, wildly entertaining look at what happens when a quintessentially American comedy gets lost in translation.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
349,550
Messages
4,883,970
Members
142,617
Latest member
StreetPreacher
Recent bookmarks
0
Top