What's new

Josh Steinberg

Premium
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
20,285
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
From what I’ve read, it’s not that people won’t get second doses, it’s that it had been believed/reported earlier that the government was holding the second shot in reserve rather than distributing them all on a rolling basis, when it turns out they’ve been distributed. But the government is also receiving new doses from the manufacturers too.

I’m more concerned about the slow roll out than the ultimate availability from the manufacturers. It seems at this point the bigger issue is still getting them to people. I know in NY, for instance, the state has only given out like a third of what they have on-hand because the bottleneck has in getting it to patients. So it seems, if not beside the point, then perhaps not the most urgent problem if it’s sitting in a federal freezer vs a state freezer.

But it certainly seems on point to say that all of the predicted distribution problems are materializing along with some unpredicted ones.
 

DFurr

Supporting Actor
Joined
Sep 6, 2010
Messages
848
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Don
John from what I've read the body, after receiving the second shot, begins to build antibodies just like a very light case of Covid 19. I have read several accounts from people that the received the second vaccine that detailed the symptoms they experienced. Most symptoms seem to go away within 24 hours or no longer than 2 days.
 

HawksFord

Premium
Joined
Sep 11, 2019
Messages
215
Location
central NY
Real Name
Maurice
I expect it will be awhile before either my wife or I get the vaccine. We're looking forward to it, but we're not high on the eligibility list. My oldest boy and his fiancee are both in law enforcement and got their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine a few days ago. He says their arms were a little sore a day or two afterwards but that was it.
 

Mark Booth

Premium
Joined
Aug 25, 1999
Messages
2,948
A friend (who is a retired nurse) is saying that some people are experiencing more noticeable symptoms from the 2nd shot. Meaning, they did fine with the 1st shot but had a larger reaction to the 2nd. She mentioned her own daughter, who didn't even get a sore arm from the 1st shot but ended up experiencing muscle aches and a 101.2 fever following the 2nd shot. The symptoms were short lived (less than a full day).

Until someone starts sprouting horns or body parts fall off, the minimal risk over body aches and fever isn't going to stop me from getting the vaccine.

Mark
 

Carlo Medina

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Oct 31, 1997
Messages
12,235
I seem to recall most of the data coming from the trials indicated that most of the notable symptoms (fever, aches, etc.) tended to occur on the second dose, so your friends' experiences seem to align with the clinical trials.

Personally, I have not seen anything in the news, or with friends I know who have gotten their vaccines, that causes me to rethink getting the vaccine. In fact, I find what's come out so far to be fairly encouraging. I'm just bummed I'm in a relatively low risk being in my forties, so I'll likely be waiting for a while until my turn in the lottery comes up.
 

LeoA

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2008
Messages
3,157
Location
North Country
Real Name
Leo
Other than one case in the US, the only alarming thing I saw is what happened in Norway with the Pfizer vaccine that's still under investigation


But except for the most elderly and frail where perhaps medical professionals will have to evaluate such individuals to determine their suitability, there appears to be little to be concerned about. There's only been news of one tragedy so far among younger and healthier individuals after millions of vaccinations and no such news about similar deaths amongst the elderly in other countries like the USA.

Sadly, the number of COVID-19 related nursing home deaths here in rural and sparsely populated St. Lawrence County in New York State alone is well above this figure for Norway. So such vulnerable individuals are still going to have far better odds than the small risk carried by the vaccination. This virus is at its worse when it reaches populations of elderly people and can easily kill dozens of people in one nursing home.

It's like what you said earlier on the last page about the occasional anomaly in a car crash that benefits from carelessly not wearing their seat belt. While great that it worked out in their favor that time, the odds are far better that the situation will be reversed and they'll be injured or killed in an accident that could've been survivable had they buckled up.
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
346,398
Messages
4,777,276
Members
141,793
Latest member
FlickLives
Top